Skip to main content

Full text of "Annual report of the city of Somerville"

See other formats


THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

OF THE 

CITY OF SOMERVILLE 

SOMERVILLE 
MASSACHUSETTS 



CA^ 



Digitized by tine Internet Arcliive 

in 2012 witli funding from 

Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofGi1876some 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE 



ANNUAL REPORTS. 




1876. 



53 5 '3 '3 ) 

3 > D .0 , 

•> . :> 5,5 






5 5^ •) 3 5,5 
) ■) -> ■• 1 






) 3 JO ) ) J ' ■) 

> > ) ' ) ) ) 

>>J>3J'« JO 



SOMERVILLE : 

SOMERVILLE JOURNAL PRESS. 

1877. 



S4ack , ^ 



ADDRESS OF MAYOR BELKNAP. 



Gentlemen of the City Council: — 

With profound gratitude for the unanimity with which the citizens 
of Somerville have conferred upon me this important trust, I enter 
upon the duties pertaining to it, fully conscious of my inability to 
discharge them successfully, without the cordial support and earnest 
co-operation of my fellow-citizens. 

While I sincerely regret that I cannot give them greater ability 
in return for their generous confidence, they may rest assured, that, 
so far as lies in m}^ power, they shall have an honest and faithful 
administration of the government. 

In receiving this honorable trust of our fellow-citizens it is 
becoming us to be sincerely grateful to Divine Providence, for the 
continued blessings of health, peace, and general prosperity within 
our city. 

In discharging the first duty which the city charter imposes upon 
me, I shall briefly ask your attention to some of the leading subjects 
which will demand your investigation the present year. 

The importance of a general knowledge of the condition of the 
finances, to those who have the practical management of our munici- 
pality, renders it necessary that j^ou should have a more explicit 
statement of their condition than can be given at this time, and for 
such statistical information 3'ou are referred to the report of the 
City Treasurer. 

It is due to the retiring members of the city government to say 
that they have labored earnestly to leave the business of the city so 
conditioned, as not to embarrass the incoming administration. 



riNAKCES. 

The gross debt at the close of the year was $1,571,854, includ- 
ing the water debt of $295,000. Increase over last year, $152,000. 
Value of public property, $1,438,000. 

The amount of the floating debt is about equal to the amount of 
taxes and assessments due the city. 

Of the public debt, there will mature the present year $181,000, 
some portion of which should be liquidated at maturity, if it can 
be done without neglecting other important interests. 

The entire amount of taxable property by the assessors' valua- 
tion of 1875 is $31,317,000. 

In making a statement showing the indebtedness of the city in 
comparison with the value of public property, there is a liability to 
mislead the public. It really matters very little to the tax-payers 
what estimated value is put upon the public property ; for we have 
no rentals of importance, and no considerable portion of it can 
ever be used in liquidation of the city indebtedness. 

On the subject of municipal indebtedness, the Legislature of 1875 
passed an act. No. 209 General Laws, entitled " An Act to regu- 
late Municipal Indebtedness." It seems to have been passed to 
enable the people to keep themselves from spending their own 
money. If this law remains upon the statute books of the Com- 
monwealth another year, it will be necessary to carry out its 
provisions. I would recommend a careful perusal of it, so that 
members may be prepared to act understandingly should occasion 
require. 

ASSESSMENT OF TAXES. 

Perhaps the most difficult and delicate duty that devolves upon 
any department is the assessment of taxes. The people of this 
country have been sensitive on this subject from its earUest his- 
tory ; and in this direction time seems to have wrought no change. 

The assessors are directed by the government to collect a certain 
sum of money on the property of the citizens, and to make the 
appropriation as equal as possible. The government finds a line of 



current expenses to be provided for, to which add for public im- 
provements such sums as ma}' be deemed expedient, and these 
make the sum to be assessed. 

This sum total may be larger or smaller, depending upon the 
amount expended on improvements, which are usuall}^ made in 
compliance with the request of the petitioners, who are the people 
to be taxed. 

The remedy lies in the hands of the people. Petitions are pre- 
sented for the grading of streets, setting of edgestones, laying of 
brick sidewalks, construction of sewers, or the erection of public 
buildings ; the petitioners are of course in favor of the object, or 
they would not sign the petition. It is referred to its appropriate 
committee. Notice is given, through the papers, of the time and 
place of a hearing to be given, when those opposed to the prayer 
of the petitioners may have an opportunity to be heard ; no one 
appearing t'j object,* the prayer is granted, and the expense of car- 
r3'ing out the measure is added to the tax of the current 3'ear, or to 
the public debt. 

High valuation of real estate has been a fruitful source of com- 
plaint in our city durin'g the past j^ear. The belief is quite general 
that it is taxed for more than its market value. This question is of 
general interest to the people, and they have a right to expect their 
expressed wishes will be regarded. It is plain to be seen that if 
personal property is taken at its market value, and real estate is 
taken above, injustice is done to the real-estate owner. 

SCHOOLS. 

The importance of education cannot well be overestimated. The 
perpetuity of our republican institutions depends upon the intelli- 
gence and virtue of the people. These are not synonymous terms, 
for one may exist without the other. Prison statistics show that 
nearly three fourths of the inmates of those institutions come from 
among the ignorant as well as the vicious classes. That " idleness 
leads to vice " is an old maxim, and is as trite as it is true. 

The young pupil being assigned a definite duty is occupied in its 
performance, and is thus kept from idleness and vice. The text- 



books of our schools are selected with especial reference to their 
moral influence, as well as for the improved method of imparting 
instruction. Under these influences the child grows in knowledge 
and in goodness, and at maturity steps on the stage of hfe with 
thoughts clear, and principles of action well established on a sound 
basis ; for the mind, like the body, grows by what it feeds upon. 

Somerville has always been liberal in her school appropriations, 
and her schools have for many years ranked with the best in the 
State. 

The appropriation for schools for 1875 was $86,000. Number of 
teachers, 86 ; number of pupils in High School, 210 ; in the other 
schools, 3,498. Total, 3,708. 

THE PUBLIC LIBKAEY 

Continues its hold upon public interest, as will be seen by the num- 
ber of books taken out during the year. Number this year, 43,498 ; 
last 3^ear, 35,087 ; increase over last year, 8,411 ; number of books 
in the library, 5,228. 

The Trustees have taken great pains to place before the reading 
public such books as will entertain and edify the patrons, and will 
elevate the reader in the scale of social, moral, and intellectual 
excellence. 

The room accommodations have been too limited for the full 
realization of all the benefits that naturally flow from this source. 
B}' a recent enlargement of its apartments, books can be delivered 
with greater facility, and a reading-room is to be connected with 
the library, which will very much increase its usefulness. 

HIGHWAYS. 

Good streets are an essential element in the general prosperity 
of any town or city, especially in the immediate vicinity of Boston, 
where the inhabitants of that city are likely to ride for pleasure, and 
where they may be prompted to seek homes, that the}^ may enjoy 
the luxury of driving over well-kept streets. 

Prompt and constant attention should be given to general repairs 
on the streets and thoroughfares that have been laid out, accepted, 



and graded by the city ; that they may invite rather than repel 
travel, and that there shall be no waste of public money by delay- 
ing repairs until the cost of making them shall be increased be^^ond 
that resulting from the actual wear and tear of public travel. 

The policy of opening streets through private property, at the 
public expense, for the purpose of bringing land into the market at 
an enhanced value, is of doubtful expediency, and should not be 
pursued in the present condition of the city finances. 

Streets that have been opened by the abutters, laid out at a 
proper width, and graded by them in a satisfactory condition, and 
where dwellings have been erected and occupied, and where the con- 
venience of those living on the street, and of public travel requires 
their acceptance, with proper assurances from the abutters that on 
account of such acceptance and grading no damages will be claimed 
by them, such streets are recommended to your favorable consider- 
ation when petitions for their acceptance are presented. 

Street appropriation, $85,000. 

STREET LIGHTS 

Make a city more cheerful, and give additional security to trav- 
ellers. The thief and the assassin seek the cover of darkness to 
conceal their evil deeds. When we remember that, but for these 
lights, we must grope our way about the cit}^ in darkness one third 
of the twenty-four hours of each da^', we realize that they are the 
cheapest luxuries that can be obtained. 

Appropriation, $8,500. Number gas lights, 274 ; oil do., 20. 
Number of lamp-posts erected in 1875, 19, — gas, 15 ; oil, 4. 

SEWERS. 

The introduction of Mystic water rendered necessary some com- 
prehensive system of sewerage, and as the water is extended into 
new sections of our city, sewerage must follow as its counterpart. 

It is a matter of regret that some general system of sewerage 
has not been adopted by Boston and its vicinity, of which Somer- 
ville is a part, that will fully meet all the requirements of the 
present and future. This subject is receiving the attention of some 



of our scientific men, who will doubtless, at no very distant day, 
report a plan that will meet the combined wants of all the towns 
and cities in this vicinity. Drainage is much needed in West 
Somerville. You will probably be asked to continue the Beacon 
Street sewer to some point in that locality. Appropriations for 
1875, $20,000. 

WATEK. 

The public health as well as the convenience of the inhabitants 
and the safety of their property requires the general introduction 
of pure water in such an abundance as to meet all the demands of 
the people. 

Total amount of distribution pipe laid in the streets to Dec. 31, 
1875, 42 miles, 2,608 ft. Laid in 1875, 1 mile, 2,307 ft. Num- 
ber of hjTlrants, 236. During the 3xar 1875, 286 service pipes 
have been laid, measuring 2 miles, 696 ft. Total cost of water 
works to Dec. 31, 1875, $320,672.08. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

This department is reported as being in good condition. The 
members are working together harmonious^, and the apparatus is 
generall}^ in a satisfactory state. 

It consists of one steam fire engine, five horse hose carriages, 
and one hook and ladder carriage. Reserve for relief purposes, 
one old horse hose carriage, and a hook and ladder carriage. There 
are 4,900 feet of hose fit for use. 

The working force consists of 79 men, including the Board of 
Engineers. The fire-alarm telegraph is in order, and is working 
satisfactorily. The number of alarms within the city limits during 
the year have been 30. Net loss by fire, $8,860. 

The relations between the firemen and police have been cordial, 
and alarms have, in all cases, been promptl}^ given. 

Our city has been exempt from fires the past year to a degree 
rarely attained. 

The promptness with which alarms are answered, the coolness 
and good judgment displayed by the firemen in the management of 
fires, and the excellent water facilities, all combined, have placed 



9 

Somerville first on the list of risks on the books of underwriters. 
As land increases in value in the more thickly settled portions of 
the cit}^, there is a tendenc}' to build wooden dwellings too near 
each other. If persisted in, this will eventually lead to serious 
consequences. Buildings erected in proximity should be con- 
structed of bricks or stone. 
Appropriation, $27,500. 

POLICE. 

This department is well organized, under good discipline, and is 
rendering efficient service. It consists of twenty-eight men, includ- 
ing officers. 

The importance of having this force composed of men active, 
intelligent, temperate, cool, courageous, and gentlemanly, cannot 
be overestimated, for the safety of the persons and the property of 
the inhabitants are committed to their care. 

During the past year new, commodious and elegant quarters 
have been provided, with all the improvements and modern conve- 
niences requisite for the comfort of the men ; and so far as relates 
to the building, for the successful management of the department. 

It is desirable that some method of communicating with the 
Central Station should be devised, to notify when arrests are made 
in different localities, and that a suitable carriage be provided for 
the conversance of persons under arrest, to and from the stations. 

Appropriation, $30,250. 



OYERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

The duties of this subdivision of the government seem to have 
been faithfully and impartially performed, with an honest effort on 
the part of those administering to deal justly and leniently with 
those who are so unfortunate as to be forced by untoward circum- 
stances to seek relief. 

The amount expended during the 3^ear is reported to be $12,000. 
The number of families helped, 455. 

The number of dependants is rapidly increasing, as public works 



10 

where laborers have been emplo^^ed are being suspended for the 
winter ; and as the rigor of the season requires more food, addi- 
tional clothing, and a constant supply of fuel which they are unable 
to provide for themselves, there is left them no alternative, how- 
ever humiliating it may be, but to solicit aid or suffer from want. 

Some of our poor are boarding in a neighboring city, which de- 
sires to be relieved from further service. It may be necessary to 
provide some place for them, should our neighbor persist in having 
them removed. 

Probably most of the members elect are aware that Somerville 
owns a farm in Waltham, containing thirty-five acres, more or less. 
It now lies fallow. Some portions of it are suitable for cultivation, 
others contain large deposits of gravel, supposed to be suitable for 
street purposes, mixed with cobble-stone, which if crushed would 
make a superior quality of McAdam for a top dressing on the 
streets, and for general repairs. It may be deemed advisable to 
erect a building on this land for the poor, so that they may be em- 
ploj^ed in cultivating the land, loading trains with gravel, and 
crushing stone, thereby earning a partial support, and thus saving 
a portion of the expense that must otherwise be borne by the tax- 
paj'ers. 

During the war, and from its close to' the crash of 1873, there 
was unprecedented activity in all branches of commercial, manu- 
facturing and mechanical industry ; and while under the inspira- 
tion of a fictitious prosperity, public improvements were made, of 
great magnitude, which resulted in a material advance in the price 
of labor. 

This advance invited labor to leave the cultivation of the soil for 
the more lucrative employment offered in the cities and large towns 
of the Commonwealth. This activity and these industries are 
checked, because they are not remunerative ; and improvements 
are stopped because the propert3^-holders cannot pay for them, and 
to continue them on borrowed capital must eventuall}^ end in bank- 
ruptcy. The only remedy for this difficulty is a redistribution of 
labor. The surplus laborers, concentrated in the cities and large 
villages, must retire into the country, and become producers as well 



11 

as consumers, or the trials and sufferings of the poor laboring man 
must be intensified with no immediate hope of relief. 

STATE AID AND SOLDIERS' RELIEF. 

It will be remembered that when soldiers were wanted to go to 
the front, one of the strongest inducements offered was the assur- 
ance that in the event of their decease, or of their being disabled 
for life, their families should not be left to suffer in poverty and 
want. Many a volunteer stood hesitating, with love of country in 
one l)alance and love of home in the other, until this assurance was 
given ; when, with an abiding confidence in the sincerity of those 
whose pledge he had received, he parted with those most dear to 
him, and hurried forward to help save his imperilled country. 
This promise should be religiously' kept, and the pledge cheerfully 
redeemed. 

Care should be taken that those who were unfaithful do not 
impose upon the generositj' of the city. No fear need be enter- 
tained of the good soldier attempting to deceive you ; for the man- 
liness that makes a good soldier places him above the practice of 
dishonest}'. 

Appropriation $1,000 for Soldiers' relief. State aid refunded by 
the State. 

PUBLIC HEALTH. 

During the four years of our municipal existence great improve- 
ments have been made in the condition of the low lands. There are 
still remaining some places where stagnant water collects, and dur- 
ing the summer months becomes a nuisance. Such places ought to 
receive attention early in the spring, that they may not engender 
disease in warm weather. 

The city is fortunately free from all epidemics at the present time. 

Appropriation, $6,000. 

THE PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

Are reported to be in thorough repair. While the Forster School- 
house was undergoing repairs, after the fire, it was critically exam- 



12 

med by competent experts, who pronounced it safe and substantial, 
except in the roof, where the trusses had shrunk and parted joints. 
These have been brought together, strengthened and secured, so 
that it is now beheved to be safe beyond doubt or question. The 
building known as the old Police Court is now unoccupied. It was 
formerly a school-house, and with a few hundred dollars expended 
in alterations, rooms may be provided for two schools. 

PUBLIC PARK. 

The work of constructing the park is reported to be so far 
advanced as to warrant the belief that it will be completed within 
the time specified in the agreement with others interested in its 
construction. The amount appropriated for this work is $200,000. 
It is expected that this sum, with the betterments to be collected, 
will complete the park and pay for ornamentation. 

Gentlemen of the City Council^ — "In entering upon the trusts 
committed to our care, let us firmly rel}' upon each other in the 
discharge of every dut}^ that falls to us to perform ; while we look 
to one another for mutual assistance in all that shall be required of 
us, let us profit by the advice of others who are equall}^ interested 
with ourselves in the management of the diversified responsibilities 
which must necessarily be connected with our cit}"." 

" While we must adhere to the most rigid economy in all expendi- 
tures^ we must maintain the honor of our city, meeting its engage- 
ments and fulfilling its obligations." 

While "we must do all we can to promote the prosperity and 
advancement of our cit}", we must defer entering upon great enter- 
prises that will require great outlays, until our finances will permit 
the same being done without increasing taxes so as to oppress 
all classes of our citizens." 

In our attempt at economy we must not exceed the limits of pru - 
dence, and refuse improvements that a judicious regard for the 
welfare of the people require. 

" Harmon}^ is the strength and support of all institutions," and 
where this is disregarded permanent success cannot be attained. 
You will not expect entire unanimity of thought and feeling while 



13 

important questions are under consideration. Differences of opinion 
and courteous discussion are necessary to bring out the facts and 
present the bearings of questions, and to perfect legislation. 

" The harmony of thhigs, 
As well as that of sounds, from discord springs." 

All feeling of a local or personal nature should be studiously 
avoided ; for a. benefit justly bestowed upon a single individual is a 
benefit to the whole community. In determining the precedence, 
reference should be had to the urgency of the work ; disregarding 
locality, ownership, or private interest. Viewed in this light, and 
tried by this standard, legislation becomes equitable, and easy to 
adjust to the wants and requirements of the people. 



T £^:H] .^S Cr]E=LEIFL"S 



FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



FINANCIAL CONDITION 



OF THE 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE; 



AND THE 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 



FOR THE FINANCIAL YEAR 1876 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Boakd of Mayor and Aldermen, Feb. 12, 1877. 
The Report of the City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes for the year 
1876 was received, accepted, and referred to the Committee on Finance, 
and sent down for concurrence. 

CHARLES E. GILMAN, Clerk. 

In Common Council, Feb. 14, 1877. 
Concurred in. 

SOLOMON DAVIS, Clerk. 



In Committee on Finance, Feb. 26, 1877. 
To the City Council of the City of Somcrville : 

The Committee on Finance, to whom was referred the Treasurer's 
Report for the financial year, ending Dec. 31, 1876, have made a careful 
examination of the same by comparing it with the Auditor's accounts, and 
with the vouchers on file ; they take pleasure in reporting that they find the 
same correct ; that it contains a faithful history of all financial transac- 
tions for the year, and that his books are kept in a systematic and accu- 
rate manner. They therefore recommend that his report be accepted. 

JOHN F. COLE, for the Committee. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, Feb. 26, 1877. 
Report accepted and adopted. Sent down for concurrence. 

CHARLES E. GILMAN, Clerk. 

In Common Council, Feb. 28, 1877. 
Concurred in. 

SOLOMON DAVIS, Clerk. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, Feb. 26, 1877. 
Ordered : That the Committee on Printing be, and they are hereby au- 
thorized to cause to be printed, a suitable number of the Treasurer's 
Report for the financial year, ending December 31, 1876. 
Sent down for concurrence. 

CHARLES E. GILMAN, Clerk. ■ 

In Common Council, Feb. 28, 1877. 
Concurred in. 

SOLOMON DAVIS, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE, 

Treasurer's Office, Feb. 12, 1877. 
To the Honorable, the Mmjor, and the City Council of the City of Somerville. 
Gentlemen, — The undersigned has the honor of presenting his 
Fifth Annual Report of the financial condition of the city, and also 
a statement of the receipts and disbursements for the jesiY 1876. 



FINANCIAL CONDITION OF THE CITY. 



Public Property. 

The value of the propert}^ of the city Dec. 31, 1875, as appears 
by the report for that year, was $1,468,853.12; and this amount 
has been increased the past year by the extension of the Water 
Works, $6,409.49 ; expended in completion of the Public Park, 
$27,333.04 ; additions to the Public Library, $750.00 ; and cost of 
land on Oliver Street, acquired by surrender of land filled by 
authority conferred by Chap. 299 of the Acts of the Legislature 
of Massachusetts for the year 1872, $11,'252.01 : making as total 
value of the public property Dec. 30, 1876, $1,511,597.66. 

Funded Debt. 

The funded debt of the city Dec. 31, 1875, amounted to 
$1,571,854.00. Of this sum $171,000.00 became due in 1876, and 
was provided for by taxation, $10,000.00, and by the issue of new 
bonds, $161,000.00. On authority of orders of the City Council, 
bonds were issued and negotiated during the 3^ear for the purpose 
of extending the Water Works, $10,000.00, and for the purpose of 
2 



18 

constructing the Beacon and Elm Streets sewer, known also as the 
" West Somerville sewer," $35,000.00, increasing the funded debt 
to $1,606,854.00. 

Taking advantage of the favorable condition of the money mar- 
ket, the Cit}^ Council, in September last, authorized the issue of 
bonds on Funded Debt account for $165,000.00, in anticipation of 
the requirement of an equal amount of the part of the debt falling 
due the present 3 ear. The bonds, bearing interest at five per cent 
and made paj^able April 1, 1895, were sold at a premium. Funded 
Debt is, consequently, temporarily increased b}^ this amount, and 
the sum has been and will be emplo3xd until required for the pur- 
pose for which it was acquired, in lieu of borrowing on Temporar}^ 
Loan Account in anticipation of the collection of taxes and assess- 
ments. 

The amount of the sinking funds, applicable to the reduction of 
the $1,606,851.00, and being the first contribution under the law of 
1875, is $45,130.62. 

The liabilities of the cit}^ Dec. 30, 1876, other than the Funded 
Debt, were Temporar}^ Loans, $110,000.00; Reduction of Funded 
Debt, for amount (except Sidewalk Loan Bond, No. 5, for 
$10,000.00) of the debt falling due the present year, $165,000.00, 
and sundry accounts, including the credit balance of Excess and 
Deficiency' Account, unappropriated, $48,767.56, amounting to 
$323,767.56 ; the assets available for the payment of this sum are, 
cash, $8,203.21; Taxes uncollected, $243,950.32; Highway Bet- 
terment Assessments, $59,262. ly ; Real Estate Liens, $8,976.67 ; 
and sundry accounts, $23,438.04 : amounting to $343,830.43. 

Lest there should be any misconception in regard to the tempo- 
rary loans and reduction of funded debt indebtedness, amounting 
to $275,000.00 as before specified, it may be stated, plainh^, and 
divested of all the technicalities and formalities of the art of ac- 
count-keeping, that the amount due to the cit}' exceeds b}' more 
than $20,000.00 the amount due hy the city, not onlj' on these two 
accounts, but also on all other accounts, excepting always Funded 
Debt Account. 

The debt of the city is, therefore, the $1,606,854.00 Funded 
Debt, with $45,130.62 in Sinking Funds towards its extinction; 



19 

and leaving thd $20,000.00 alread}^ alluded to, in addition to the 
$13,039.99 to the credit of Excess and Deficiency Account, to be 
applied to any abatements on taxes and assessments, and for the 
paj^ment of any claims for which the city may be found to have 
made itself liable prior to the year 1876, and not yet adjusted. 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS. 

The balance in the treasury, Dec. 31, 1875, was $16,875.09; 
the receipts during the year were $1,790,281.85, and the disburse- 
ments for the year, $1,798,953.73, leaving as balance in the treas- 
ur}^ at the closing of the year's accounts, $8,203.21. 

There was raised by taxation in 1876 for the debit balance of 
Excess and Deficiency Account of 1875, $11,275.87 ; for the State 
and County Taxes, $37,490.51 ; for Overlay and Abatement 
Account, $10,778.24; and for the year's current expenses, $444,- 
930.62 ; a total as per Assessors' Warrant, of $504,4 75.24. The 
sum to Excess and Deficienc}' Account was placed in offset to its 
debit ; the amount for State and Count}" taxes was applied to their 
payment ; the credit to Overlay and Abatement Account was more 
than absorbed by abatements on taxes ; and of the amount for 
the current expenses accounts, there remains to the credit of Ex- 
cess and Deficienc}' Account of 1876, after their payment and the 
payment of sums found to have been due on current expenses 
accounts of former years, including also the cost of land on Oliver 
Street, surrendered to the city, and the deficiency in Overla}' and 
Abatement Account, and crediting the sums received as Corpora- 
tion and Bank taxes from the State, and for premium on bonds 
sold, the sum already noted, of $13,039.99. 

Your attention is respectfull}" called to the accompanying Appen- 
dix, as specifying in detail the subject-matters presented in this 
report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

AARON SARGENT, Treasurer. 



APPENDIX TO TREASUPEK'S REPORT. 



Table A. 

PUBLIC PROPERTY, DEC. 30, 1876. 

Central Hill Land (12 acres, 27,920 

feet), $175,000 00 

City Hall, $13,000 00 

Furniture, 4,550 00 

17,550 00 
Public Library, 7,250 00 

Steam Fire Engine House, • 19,500 00 

Furniture, 500 00 

Steam Fire Engine and Ap- 
paratus, 6,000 00 
Steam Fire Enaine Hose Car- 



riage and Apparatus, 2,000 00 



High School House, 60,000 00 

Furniture, 4,000 00 

Philosopical Apparatus, 500 00 



Prescott School House Land (21,444 

feet) and Building, 55,000 00 

Furniture, 3,000 00 



Luther V. Bell School House Land 

(23,396 feet) and Building, '57,977 71 
Furniture, 3,122 29 



28,000 00 



64,500 00 



58,000 00 



61,100 00 



Amount carried forward, $411,400 00 



22 

Amount brought forward^ $411,400 00 

Forster School House Land (32,693 

feet) and Building, $52,500 00 

Furniture, 1,500 00 



Morse School House Land (29,109 

feet) and Building, 30,000 00 

Furniture, 1,250 00 



Linc.iln Scliool House Land (18,000 

feet) and Building, 14,000 00 

Furniture, 1,000 00 



Prospect Hill School House Land 

(25,313 ft.) and l^uilding, 30,000 00 
Furniture, 600 00 



Jackson School House Land (11,212 

feet) and Building, 13,050 00 

Furniture, 500 00 



Bennett School House Land (20,560 

feet) and Building, 15,000 00 

Furniture, 500 00 



Webster School House Land (11,050 

feet) and Building, 12,000 00 

Furniture, 500 00 



Union School House Land (9,360 

feet) and Building, 4,500 00 

Furniture, TOO 00 



Harvard School House Land (9,810 

feet) and Building, 3,500 00 

Furniture, 200 00 



54,000 00 



31,250 00 



15,000 00 



30,600 00 



13,550 00 



15,500 00 



12,500 00 



4,600 00 



3,700 00 

Amount carried forward^ $592,100 00 



23 

Amount brought forward^ §592,100 00 

Edgerly School House Land (26,428 

feet) and Building, $35,000 00 

Furniture, 500 00 



Brastow School House Land (10,019 

feet) and Building, 8,000 00 

Furniture, ' 250 00 



Franklin School House Land (33,017 

feet) and Building, 18,000 00 

Furniture, 500 00 



Beach Street School House Land 

(6,000 feet) and Building, 6,000 00 

Furniture, 500 00 



City Stables and Dwelling Houses, 11,000 00 

Equipments for Highway' Repairs, 4,500 00 

No. 1 Hose House Land (4,312 feet) 

and Building, 5,600 00 

Furniture, 400 00 
John E. Wool Hose Carriage 

and Apparatus, 2.000 00 



35,500 00 



8,250 00 



18,500 00 



6,500 00 

Spring Hill School House Land (4,991 

feet) and Building, 2,500 00 

Furniture, 200 00 

~ 2,700 00 

City Farm Land (10 acres, 12,523 feet) 40,000 00 

Cedar Street School House 1,500 00 

Furniture, 100 00 



1,600 00 



15,500 00 



8,000 00 
Amount carried forward^ $728,650 00 



24 



Amount brought forward^ 
No. 2 Hose House Land (5,400 feet) 
and Building, 
Furniture, 

Winter Hill Hose Carriage 
and Apparatus, 

No. 3 Hose House Land (5,226 feet) 

and Building, 
Furniture, 
Geo. H. Foster Hose Carriage 

and Apparatus, 
R. A. Vinal Hook and Ladder 

Truck and Apparatus, 
Prescott Hook and Ladder 

Truck and Apparatus, 

No 4 Hose House Land (9,100 feet) 
and Building, 

Furniture, 

Geo. O. Brastow Hose Car- 
riage and Apparatus, 

Relief Hose Carriage, 

Fire Alarm Telegraph, 
Police Station Land (15,232 feet) and 
Building (Bow Street), 
Furniture, 

Prospect Street Land (7,918 feet) and 
Building (old Police Sta- 
tion), 

Public Park, 

Joy Street Land (2,960 feet), 

Walnut Hill Land (10,890 feet), 

Amount earned forward^ 



$728,650 00 



12,250 00 
300 00 

2,000 00 



13,000 00 
300 00 

2,000 00 

3,400 00 

500 00 



16,000 00 
400 00 

2,000 00 
600 00 



49,204 54 
3,595 46 



14,550 00 



19,200 00 



19,000 00 
15,800 00 



52,800 00 



10,000 00 

212,395 67 

1,000 00 

1,500 00 

$1,074,895 67 



25 

Amount brought forward^ SI, 074, 895 67 

Ledge Land, on Bond St. (39,732 feet), $5,000 00 
Holland St. (5 a. 6;806 feet), 25,000 00 
Milk Street (39,456 feet), 7,000 00 

37,000 00 
Gravel Land in Waltliam (about 35 

acres), 35,C00 00 

Gravel Land in Wakefield (about 1 J 

acres), 13,500 00 

Gravel Land in Winchester (about 2 

acres), 700 00 

Somerville Water Works, 327,457 33 

Tufts Street Land (29,584 feet), 14,792 65 

Oliver Street Land (63,069 feet), 11,252 01 



Total, $1,514,597 QQ 



26 



CD 



< 
H 






o w 









w 
o 

p 

H 

ft 
W 
P 



p 



pa 
H 

1-3 '-^ 

H ^ 

. Hi 

CO ^ 



O 
























^ 













»* 









^ 



















^ 











>o 






s 


c 










0^ 








0^ 


0^ 








00 






CO 


c 










t- 








lO 


CO 








CO 






00 


c 










I— 1 




























-< 










^ 








' 




















c 




































^ 


t. o 










, r-H 












^■" 








n 






. "-^ 


^ "^ 










>C — • 










LO 


1 






Iff 


^H 






Iff — 


4i 5* 










C-. 'r 











•^ 






<33 


*C 






S"i^ 


c S 










Sft 








C3 


a. 






oc 


O4 






S C< 












<1 












< 








<5 






<: 


cc 


























































^^_^ 








_^^ 


















fci 


6 




T3 












M 














^ ! 

• 






3 






b. 


r 


c 


be 















. 








3 
C • 






o 






'a 


t^ 


c 








li . 







c 






.a , 






o 

Q. 

3 








P 
c 

> 


^ 1 




c 


^ 


CO • 


^ 

























C3 


■" "^ 




c 









*^ c5 


-4^ il-l 























0) 


w 


CS 




0) tl 


. 


OJ 




oc 


b 














rS 


OQ 


M 


h:i 


Z ^ 


CO 




OS 


^ 


^J 


00 










c3 
.2? 




"5 




"3 




3 




i 






« 2'^ S 

. «; 

::: k - es 


C3 




3 







^ 




'^ ^ 


S rH 


s 





0^ 


S S 


^ -1 


^ > 


> 


/I 


1-1 


> 






00000000 











000 





000 


•^ 





0000 





• 




00000000 











000 





000 iO 





0000 


2 = 


c 




C^ 


0000 


o__o 


o_ 


o__ 








o_o_^ 


o_ 


"^^ 




Tt 


•* 


00 


0^0^ 


0_'ff 


3 




c-f^i 00 


o'o-o* 


0" 


»o 





co' 





OiO 




ift 


-* 


o'co 


7^" 0" 


xrf ~ 


a 




m 


CO 


rj- i-l <M (M 






W T-H 


(M C^ t-< 


CO 




rH 


•"• 


»-i 




»OC^ 












































000000-^0 





a <=> 


c 





000 


»t 














.PM . 







0000000 





000 


000 





00c 


>o 





00 








c c 







0000000 


o_ 





o^o__ 


000 





o_o 




-^ 


"^ 


00 


» 


-ffi 


S.2 






































(M M i« 


irt »o 


0" 


ifi ic 


lO 








o'lO c 


>o 


■^ 


OCO IM 


>r. -1 






■^ 




(N 


1— ( 


rH 




I— 1 


(N 1-1 


— H 




I— ( 


ri 


i-i 




u:ic^ 






































(]3 

3 




i-T 




















^. 






















»-H 


1— ( 
















1-1 






i-l ih' 


"O 


t- 














00 




c' 



















c 


00 


•r; 


- - 


- - 


» » >> 


-►^ 


- 


: « 00 


*^ 


i 3 QO 


^ 


"S ' 


. 


>. 


^ 


S - 


3 " 00 


_>>^ 


^ 

? 




a, 
<1 





















5 






■-J 








r- 


^0 


t=;;'S 






































£.0 s 














































-.lc« 






i-!c« 






-1C« 




-lc< 




-•10 




-.let 






oj "^ 




t- 


^ w 


tc i 


2^2 


t- 


«o 


- ^ 


i~: to 


* 


t- CO 


J 





^ 


i 


3 « 


s ^ 


"S Sti 






































«=-« 






































•S 


















10 




















fl 


















CO 



























CO 


00 


lO -^ 






>o 


cia 












T-> 




CO 
-f 


CO ■»«< 







(C 




^t 


CO I- 

S22 


lO 


t- 




-+ 


■0 CO 


CO 



-H r- 


-- «M 





t- CO 


"* vi 


c 




coco _= 


Oc^ 




05 


CO 


■0 


■* CO 


If 


^(i8 


> 

Eh 








(Ti 





(M 00 






c^ 


of 




T^ 










lO 






CO 





CD (O 








CO 












H 




-* 


3 
















1-1 


















n 




















CO 




















^. 
























































































Ji 








^ 












ii 












































c 












c3 








es 


«k 










•^ 











„ 








^ 


^ 






& 


3 


^ 








^ , 






>-] 




J*^ 








» 


>. 









"ti* 


>> 








rH ^ 
















"73 








- Ti 




<l-3 -• 


































^ 




















6 








s 


b 






OQ 


0" 








So 










^ 






- 


1—1 


"^ 




1—1 




I— 1 . 


T-( 




^ 


^- 


^- 




i-^r^ 


Date 


00 


< 


" 


'^ 


<• '• 


•-5 


<5 





<x> 


*J - - to 


is 

•-3 


a," 

< 


;; 


00 — 30 
ri 3 ri 

•-5 


0"^ 







» - 00 





27 



<5 



>o nS !2 :;i 
<5 <1 






•re —3 lO -^ 









<5 



5 

es 




t5 



000 
000 
o o o 



O O O O O 3 

000000 
000000 



00000000 
00000000 
•00000000 



0000 
0000 
0000 



0000 
0000 

0000 
















000000 





00000000 





0000 





0000 



















000 


000 





00000000 


c— > 














0000 






















.c 





•re 0000000 














0000 













































iC ?3 


iM -H .re 





t~Lreooooire>o 





o<N 





(M ire ire 


® lO 




rH 


Tj( 


IN 




to — 1 t-H 


f-H -N 


I-H 


l-H i-H ift »* r-l 


l—l 


I-l 




r-i 


(M 








r^ 








'^r^ 






-'r^" r-T 




_ i-T 
"* — < 






r-5 




T-T 




4J 




oo - ^ 




"^ *-i 
















>> 




^ 




u 


^ 


* 5- 


^ 




^ " ^ 


^ 




^ 


00 " 3 


^ 


• 




^ "t ^ ^ 


Zi * 

















<5 






"-5 



































-w 






CO 










00' 






■ 


" 






•re 


«o ; » " 


«3 - 





■ C o 



" ® t- 00 "* 

^ g o 

o &. « o 

-•JO-- — 



CO •o 00 '"' 



•recij 



to O ^ O T-H o 



'^ 



'S 









01 « 



M 



^ -^ rt . "^ 



rjQ O 



^•- 



- .rt 






ooooco»«- - SoSo- 



t- ^ t~ i< >>^ - - - » *^ 1- ♦J 




coyoOQ,------ OQOO 





28 



i 



r3 



lO ,_, 



00 P( 



o — o r;2 

00 T* Ol J- 

<5 ^ 



<1 



- ^1* gft s^ 



ic— I to ^ "^ :;i S2 

G5 •" o -*• ® - ® 

S f^ — "= S ftS'3 



5J 






f-H 

CO 

h 



C3 



M 
a 



O r^ 






OAh C5 



,« 



PL, 



o 

c 
o 
pq 
>> 

c3 
Ph 

o 



or; 



^ iiw 



ca = 



v2 o 



E C 
O C 

p«ft 
o o 



E.2 



o c 

05 O 



ci <^ 






00 C- 

o 



=0 r-l 



c 

O 



W 



w 



C3 O 



ft 

o 






2? 



"^OOOOOOOOOOOO 

iraoooooooooooo 
eo_o_o_o_io o o o^o_o_o_o_o_ 

o~>oo"io"cTi-ro5 i-H c^o'co'o'o' 

OO JO i£5 CO C^ ''S 

05 rl 



O O O O O O 
O O O O O O 

o o o o o o 



o o o o o o 

o o o o c o 
o o o o o o 



o o o 
o o o 

o o o 



.oooooooooooo 
•oooooooooooo 
. o_o o_io o_o o^o_o_o o o^ 

• 


o 
o 


o o o o o o 
0000=0 

o^o^o o__o 

\a •* co'itTl'Tia" 




o_o -.''S 
lO lO '— lO 


35,500 
5.000 
1,000 





o__ 




irt 




o_ 



VO -H Ift 

I—I »l«i— I 3 
<] ra 



CD — . 




„ ^ lO — • „ 


^ CO >c « to 


00 -r^ ,: 


.« ^ 


-. i C3 "r" - 


- C5 > -r >» 

r-i 3 — ftri 3 


I-H ft 




^5^ 


<J 




<1 


t-5 < >-3 



a». «^ 



j2 "-^ 



^«o to 

^00 OJ 

>.o o 



: 00 00 



O — I CO •« 

I— I l-H (>5 T— I 

,-1 to 5~» t^ 



CO t- 



00 CO 



t— 00 C5 

c lO lo lo o O 



(N 



CO t^ «^ 

lO CO CO 

I- 00 <N 



O CO 

1-1 CO 

goo 
I-l *^ •*^ 

O "0 






^3 






^ 



00 -J » - ■• 



CO -^ lO CO — ■ 

- - - - 00 Jroo±>« - - - - 00 *^- 

^ ft„ j3 pH ft 

<1 1-3 <5 






29 



06 



P 
o 

o 

<\ 

o 

P^ 
o 

t— I 

ft 

O - 

gS 

£^P 

^2 

^5 

^•-^ 

m 

H 

Pui 

I— I 
O 

o 

hH 

H 

I— ( 
Ph 

o 

p^ 

Ph 
Pm 
<1 



■« CO 

o 





eo 


I— 1 


•* 




r-i 


1— 






i*r 


t- 


t- 






l-H 




rH I-H 






iM 


I-H Ol 






CO 


03 CO 






(N 








CO 


eo<^ 








lO JO 






CO 


















^ 






^ 



O Q 

P 






H 

m 
W 

t3 

H 

p— I 

ft 

Ph 

M 

OQ 

H 
Ph 
I— ( 
W 
O 

OQ 

o 

I— I 

H 

< 
I— I 

P5 
fu 
O 
P^ 
P-i 

<1 












c5 o u 



« H 



i2®S 
So" 



S^tq 



S tS cj 



H 
Z 

o 
o 
o 

< 






Cfl 05 O rH 
O lO W O 
«0 I-H -* -* 



^ 



OS ;0 

<M 05_ 
t- GO 

to o 
«o t- 



, o 
o 

• ■«* 

• 00 



• CO O '00 

• <0 O '05 



O O (M lO 
r-i 00 O 00 
O CO 1-1 «D 



00 CO 
iCiOJ 






•^ 



o • £ • 
C =-= . 

•IJ • 

• a> Suo c3 bo • 

. ^5 .5 c .5 . 

-a M^ be 

• •- n o c • 
•so o , 

Vh 4> o ^ . 

p.ra g rt aj rt ^ 
O- ej o to "^ «) " 



Pi 

o 



. iC O 01 05 O CO lO 
O O 00 lO rl r-H 0> 

' CO o >o a> ITS CO I— 

. I— I o 00 t~ b» 05 o; 

50^0 co_ ^_co_o>^cs^ 

• c'-tA •>* co'co'c^Ti-T 



>f5 lO ?^ »-l CO 
(N •* 00 "O lO 
C^O ^ r- C3 

CO CO 






V= c S^ '- 

• « V ;S ^ 

• g 2 -^ ^ 

.§=•£2 



o 



-=> l- 



= 5Q 



i o ;i 

rt c rt 






cS 

^ CO (X X OQ OD 

" c; cS rt c9 fl 

^ sJ •; p: ^ & 



. c^ 



o a> * • 

> > /^ q; « ^ 
^ <rt -k^ i- a* '-v'-^ 

W ^ (-• T^ C -C 

c c s ts « ^^fco 

o O ^- <orz c; " 



(U - 4, 

= >-S. 



c3c«c3c5c3C5CSa; 

t«^ ^ j: ^ j= ^ ^ r 

C 21 &B 5/ tj) M bf; S/^ 



# IS us 

b/j b/. be 



30 



6 



o 

CD 

H 



5^ 

O 
O 
Q 

o 

»— I 
Q 

I— I 

Ph 

o 

W2 
o 

p£^ CO 

ad 

m 

^S 
S^ 

g« 

S^ 

g^ 

M 

m 
H 

Ph 

O 

P^ 

o 
I— I 

I— ( 
« 
Ph 
O 
P^ 



pq CO 
P5 d 

o 

w 



o 

O O 

G 






2.030 

B " .; 

pa 53 

Q 






o ^ p, 



l«^ 






Tt Ol O •« 
-^ IM t^ (N 

Tt Ol CO I— 



oo o o 

I— lO o 

I— O rH 



CO lO 



o l^ 

CO CO 






(MO * CO CO * I- <M 



OO 00 -rf m 

1— O , CO o 

•^ iC i-c CO 

?^ cT • (M 



CO <M 

•<* CO 



<u o u 



•M O 



COOiffC'JtNcOOJ'* 
r— rl IM 0> irt (M O 
O iC (M ■>« 05 CO 



• O 

• 00 



02 

p 

o 
o 
o 
<1 



"s "r "o 



l|i 

OB 

■•^00 0! 
5 >>>> 

^ C3 C3 

§ & fe 
WW 



• « • S 
c iL 

•PQ 
bc« Sags c 

C & C P c « 

5 U g be g o 

w w £ 



<C i-l • CD t- 
O CO . r^ O 

CO ■<* »c o 



(M -^ • CD lO 



' m it 

' C > 

,.io 

I u o 



CJ5 

. c ■" 

*.= C 

. ^ a> 

• cs a> 

O O O 

c c « 

o o ^ .S 

CC 00 ^ ^ 



opq 

0) 






cs :^ cj 

<u S » .2 

o c— ^ 

O t, 3 3 



^M 



Ph-' 



O CO 

O CO 
CD T-\ 



o o c o o o 
o o o o o o 

r- — O C: O O 



•* »0 OO 

C5 oi 00 

(N »* CC 
CO t- IH 



O CD 
O O 
O CO 



o ' CO 



. rf uO -t O iC OS 

• lo CO CO o> 1-- i- 

Oi i-l O -f t~ o 
tC CD O IM CO O 
00 -^ CD 00 Ol t— 



Err 

3 « . . 

^^ S • 
o ca 






3 3 

PhPh 



* 3 



o 






0) 

s « 

^ a 3 «,J= 

C O O 3 5C 

o--wfe:j 

o o c o t; 

w CJ U O -iJ 

OQQQOCQQQD 



31 





«D ;0 


o> 


00 o 




*- 




<M CO 


-* 


(M O 


CO 




<oo> 


CO 


CO O 







lO CO 


00 


<-l o 







o -^ 


CO 


C(0 o 



















o 


'i" 


CO o 













i-H 













l-( 




CO 




. . •— 1 


(N . f>l . '^ 


t~ 


o> 




t- 


rH • CO 


CO 


CO 


t- 




' •,# 


■^ * o 


lO 





•* 




. .<o 


lO , lO 


t- 





o>_ 




' • ■Tjl 


c-i^ "i. 


• CO 



















« 




. .c4 • 


•W^ • CO 


IH 


CD 










•<* 















• <N 






irt . 


— 




.05 . 




.s^ . 


'^ 


00 






' -^ 




r-l 


I— 


,_( • 






lO * 




• o> * 


I-l 


<M . 






. fS . 




. ^ . 


I- 


O * 






rH 




• C<J 


CO^ 


r^ • 








• • • 














^ . . 




lO 








■ 


O 






t» 








. ! ! 








CO 

co_ 








• • • 


l-H • • • 






ctT 




"^ 




. o 













c 




o 













c 




•o 













c 




. o 












<= 




o_ 








'^ 




iC 




• o" 








i-H 




c: 




^iH 








I— 

CO 






^ 


.00 















t» 


o> 








>o 






■* 


• t- 








CO 






0-- 


.'-o 








UO 






■* 


• r-T 








1— I 

CO 








* 




. . • 


^ 


§ • 






O . 


O O . . IM . 


. ^ . 


-t" 






o 


o -;> o * 





IM 


o • 






o • 


o 0^ • * o * 


•0 • 


>o 


o , 






o . 


<= Ol . .CO , 


. '^ . 


t~ 


o^ 






00 • 


'-L^'~~ '~L 


• 


't- 
















cT • 






• 


-Tt-T • • o • 


•CO • 


-1^ 


I— 1 






, 


rH iM ^ ^ -* 


l-H 



10 












«^ 


r-lOl 




.-* 


. .^J"* . ,00 ,eooo5 .1- 


H c:5 


O l- 




o 


r-it- I- OOOCOC 


15 rH 


lO -H 




• o 


* ' ^TO ' 'OO ' XiO <£> *C 


3 t- 


>* •* 




.00 


, ,iOS> , .CO ."MOO .t- 


- 1 I— 


•o o 




• »o 


C-ICO l~ 0500 C 


J t— 














CO r-T 






••Tnc^'-i-i»o>ft •(? 


1 m 










i-l M 05 


CO 








• • 


• <N • 


CO 








• • 


... 




o o 




. ■* 


o o 


.-♦• 3 , CROCDOiT 


2 lO 


O '* 




1> 


o o 


•■00 • -* * • I- O O CO r- 


■< 00 


(O o 




•n 


O 00 


•'f 'oO ' *COOCO-fCi! 


3 tH 


CO CO 




. "* 


CO C^ 


-CO .CO . .coococou- 


5 00 


(NOO 




^ 


O^ 


d O CO O C^ CO 


iM 












1 "^ 


o 




• 05 


r^ 


• t~ "* • • CO rr o CO 





IM 




1—1 




CO 'i' f-( 

» . • • -^ CO 


C5 

i-T 






05 t- 




. a> 




... s^ .."*.. ^ o 


5 


Or-( 




I— 1 




• O "CO * CT. OC 


5 


O 35 




* o 




* * * <N • * CO * • Ol C£ 


) CT> 


l-C< 




.OJ 




. . .^ . .00 , .COCT 


5 OJ 


«OQO 




to 




OJ^ ^_ '-'Z.'^ 


s t-^ 














■<1^ 




"N 




• • . CO . • co" • • rjT 


r— 1 


C^ 




.•^ 




CO • • 


-r 


t: , 


T*< 


00 . 


rl •* •N •:♦• O . O C^ O O CO . I- 


CO 


o • 


I:~ 


CO 


'OOi-ICOO lOCOcOOOO 1- 


t— 


OS * 


CO 


Irt • 


"* CO ■^ O -M ' IM O Ol O '1^ * ic 


^3 


30 . 


■^ 


o . 


Oi-H>-'^COOi .iMCOlMOC^ .0- 





1— ( 


05_ 




t-OO^^tNaOt- •Oir-^rH'O^ 'i 


!. "^ 














1— c • 


cT 




t-^ ■<* -* 1-- • >l lO 03 -* • o: 


00' 


l-H 


c^ 






C^ (N ■* (M C^ 


a; 










o^ * 

. rH . 




.. 












• • o 






• 




• • 




. . "^ 








. . • . "^ • . 


00 




i3 






• • 




• -a 




• 'Sd 








. .'« . o . . 


. c 
• 




' -a 




00 


s 


•oo^ -1 • • 


•s 




*«S 




. a 


> 




• 00 




.c=a 




;h 


•00:2 •—> • •yoo 




a> ^ 




00 


ai 


. -C 1 „ C c3 -3 




• S o 
m 00 




00 


II 






^ Ih ^ 

V <u O' 


0) 


^ ^ 


.2 33 a 




^^ & 




QQC£ 


2a| 




« V V 




o o i^ 

caoQX 


p +j 2 3 .rt ^ "^ 
OQ OQ OQ OQ yj H 5-1 


^ 


^^ 





OS CO O CO t- 
1-- CD O CO 



OS 

O 



3 JO JT r-l 



rt '« 



O 
t— ( 

H 

H 
t— ( 

o 





JZ 





,a 








CO 


^3 





• 






1) 


,£3 


1) 





EC 




3 






cS 


C) 




a, 


00 


m 


Cl, 


00 




.F- 





'A 


j3 





P^ 


X 


J 


c3 







C3 


a 





ci 


^ 




P 


J 



« o 



32 



Table D. 

KKCEIPTS DURING THE YEAR 1876. 

Estate belonging to Owner unknown. 

Received for tax title of land on Foun- 
tain Ave., sold for non-pay- 
ment of assessment for tilling, $220 24 

Fire Department. 

Received of Tufts College Corpora- 
tion, for Fire Alarm Telegraph 
box at college. $250 00 

J. R. Hopkins, amount received by 

him for horse sold, 88 32 

for manure sold, 52 00 

Quincy Mutual Fire Insurance Co., 
return premium on expired pol- 
icy on George H. Foster Hose 

House, 36 00 

426 32 



Funded Debt. 

Received from sale of bonds authorized 
by the City Council : — 
Bonds Nos. 23 to 31 Water Loan, 70,000 00 
Bonds Nos. 175 to 334 City Loan, 226,000 00 
Bonds Nos. 1 to 7 Sewer Loan, 35,000 00 



371,000 00 



Highways. 

Received of sundry persons, for earth 

sold them, 166 50 

N. H. Dow, for gravel, 40 00 



Amounts carried fonvardy $206 50 $371,646 56 



33 

Amounts brought forward, $206 50 $371,646 56 

Received of R. E. Nickerson, amount 
received by him for old iron 
sold, 

Rent of tenements on City Farm, 

Highwa3'S (Chaunce}^ Ave.) ac- 
count, for teaming, 

Highways (Concord Ave.) account, 
cost of constructing, 

Highway's (Concord Ave.) account, 
for stone, 180 00 

Highwa3^s (Newton St.) account, 

cost of constructing, " 953 50 

Highwaj's (Glen St ) account, 

cost of constructing, 151 80 

5,729 84 



30 


79 


65 


00 


1,097 


00 


3,045 


25 



Highways (Milk Street Widening). 

Received of the Count}' Commissioners 
amount allowed on account of 
the widening, . 5,000 00 

S. C. Darling, amount received by 
him for land sold Jane Casey, 
being a part of an estate bought 
and not required for the widen- 
ing, 25 00 



5,025 00 



Highways (Broadway Widening). 

Received of S. C. Darling, amount 
received by him for land sold 
J. S. Brazillian, being a part of 
an estate bought and not re- 
quired for the widening, 366 00 

Amount carried forward^ $382,767 40 

3 



34: 

Amount brovght forward, $382,767 40 

Highway Betterment Assessments. 

Assessed in 1873, uncollected Dec. 31, 

1875, $7,660 00 

Uncollected Dec. 30, 1876, 7,660 00 



Assessed in 1875, uncollected Dec. 30, 

1875, 60,407 05 
Abatements, $2,308 34 
Uncollected Dec. 30, 

1876, 42,629 84 

— : 44,938 18 



15,468 87 



Assessed in 1876, $16,006 60 

Abatement, $58 86 

Uncollected Dec. 30, 

1876, 8,972 35 

. 9,031 21 



6,975 39 



Received for 1875, 15,468 87 

1876, 6,975 39 



Incidentals. 

Received of the State Treasurer on 
Corporation Tax for 1875, 

1876, 
On Bank Tax for 1876, 
Premium on sale of city 5 per cent 
bonds. 

Amount carried forward, 



22,444 26 



44 


94 






2,885 


19 






4,679 


09 






2,320 


31 










9,929 


53 










$415,141 


19 



35 

Amount brought forward^ $415,141 19 

Interest. 

Received on deposits in banks, $1,692 59 

On taxes, 11,748 52 

On tax titles released, 39 78 

On betterments, 103 87 

On bonds issued, accrued interest, 

at time of disposal, 737 65 

Of W. H. Wright on overpaj^ment 

on filling the Public Park, 48 30 

14,370 71 



Liquor Licenses. 

Received of sundry persons for Liquor 

Licenses, granted : 

Third Class, 9 at $50.00 each, 450 00 

Fourth Class, 7 at $50.00 each, 350 00 

11 at $75.00 each, 825 00 

Fifth Class, 2 at $50.00 each, 100 00 



Miscellaneous. 

Received of an unknown person amount 
received b}' him from some per- 
son as money belonging to the 
city, 50 00 

Public Park maintenance account, 
cost of summer and tool houses, 956 00 

George A. Kimball, amount re- 
ceived by him for centennial 
trees on Central Hill land, 31 50 

Charles E. Oilman, amount re- 
ceived by him for marriage cer- 
tificates, and for recording 
mortgages, etc., 501 90 

fees for licensing dogs, 138 00 



1,725 00 



Amounts carried forivard, $1,677 40 $431,236 90 



36 

Amounts hroiigU forward, $1,677 40 $431,236 90 

Received fees on real estate sold 
and advertised to be sold for 
non-payment of taxes and as- 
sessments, 740 80 

2,418 20 



Miscellaneous (Watering Streets). 

Received of sundry persons as their 
proportional part of the cost of 
watering streets, 2,073 83 

Miscellaneous account, abutters' 
half not collected, 434 25 



Police. 



Public Library. 

Received of the County Treasurer, re- 
turn on Dog Licenses for 1875, 1,260 29 

Of the Librarian for Catalogues 

sold, 42 CO 

Fines, 174 46 



2,508 08 



Received of Lebbeus Stetson, Clerk of 

the Court, Officers* Fees, etc., 2,134 35 

Police Station Incidentals. 

Received of the State Treasurer, for rent 

of Armory for 1875, 242 00 

For use of hall in Police Station 

building, 61 37 

303 37 



1,476 75 

Amov7it carried forward, $440,077 65 



37 

Amount brought forward^ S440,077 65 

Public Park. 

Received of S. C. Darling, amount 

receiv^ed by him of W. H. 

Wright, over-pa^^ment on con- 



1,392 21 



tract for filling. 








$1,335 85 


For earth sold. 








24 86 


For lumber sold. 


rment 


Assess- 


31 50 


Public Park Bette; 




ments. 










Assessed in 1876, 








46,932 90 


Uncollected Dec. 


30, 


1876, 


46,254 09 



Received, 678 81 

Real Estate Liens. 

Tax-titles of property acquired by the 
city during the year in conse- 
quence of non-pa3^ment of taxes 
and assessments, 10,306 14 

Unredeemed Dec. 30, 1876, 8,976 67 



Received for property released, 1,329 47 

Salaries. 

Received of Sewers account, for labor of 

engineer's assistants, 374 77 

Highways account, for labor of en- 
gineer's assistants, 374 77 

749 54 



School Contingent. 

Received for tuition of non-resident 

pupils, 144 04 

For use of rooms in school-houses, 27 00 

For books furnished b}^ the school 

committee, 17 77 



188 81 



Amount carried forward, $444,416 49 



38 

Amount brought forward, , $444,416 49 

School-house Repairs. 
Received for old stoves sold, 58 00 

Street Lights. 

Received of sundry persons for lamp- 
posts located, 300 38 

Sewers. 

Received of the city of Cambridge four 
ninths of labor and materials 
used on Milk Street sewer, 
under bridge, $37 34 

Bernard Carney, for privilege of 

entering sewer, 15 00 

J. F. Edmands, for privilege of en- 
tering sewer, 60 00 

Health Department account, cost 

of constructing cesspool in 

Ward Street, 61 ,15 

In South Street, 62 51 

236 00 



Sewer Assessments. 






Assessed in 1873, uncol- 






lected Dec. 31, 






1875, 




1,322 55 


Abatements, 


$293 39 




Uncollected Dec. 30, 






1876, 


440 46 


733 85 








588 70 


Assessed in 1874, 


1,218 53 


Abatement, 




1,218 53 



Amount carried forwards, $445,010 87 



39 



Amount hrouglit forward^ 




$445,010 87 


Assessed in 1875, uncollected Dec. 






31, 1875, 




$19,961 61 




Abatements, 


$215 83 






Uncollected Dec. 30, 








1876, 


636 68 






Credited in Real Es- 








tate Liens ac- 








count, 


371 70 


1,224 21 












18,737 40 




Assessed in 1876, 


3,545 01 




Abatements, 


13 80 






Uncollected Dec. 30, 








1876, 


2,017 86 


2,031 ^% 












1,513 35 




Received for 187^, 


588 70 




1875, 




18,737 40 




1876, 




1,513 35 


20,839 45 


Sidewalk Assessments. 




Assessed in 1873, uncollected Dec. 31, 






1875, 




208 55 





Assessed in 1874, uncollected Dec. 31, 

1875, 11,357 79 
Uncollected Dec. 30, 

1876, 512 16 
Credited in Real Es- 
tate Liens account, 589 04 

1,101 20 



10,256 59 



Amount carried forward, $465,850 32 



40 



Amount brought forward, 
Assessed in 1875, uncollected Dec. 31, 
1875, 
Uncollected Dec. 30, 1876, 



Received for 1873, 

1874, 
1875, 

Soldiers* Relief. 
Received for aid rendered. 

Somerville "Water "Works. 
Received of the town of Everett, for 

water pipe, 
Arlington Water Works, for water 

pipe, 
Patent Water and Gas Pipe Co., 

for repairs in 1875 on guaranteed 

pipe, 
Boston and Lowell Railroad Co., 

cost of lowering pipe under 

culvert in Washington Street, 
Public Park account, for water 

gate, etc., 
Highways account, for setting 

watering trough, 
Health Department account, for 

repairing pipe. 
Miscellaneous account, for stand 

pipes, etc., 

for setting watering troughs, 
For old junk, etc. sold, 
For repairing pipe. 

Amounts carried forward, 



$465,850 32 



11,129 85 
1,952 55 

9,177 30 

208 55 

10,256 59 

9,177 30 



501 95 

13 35 

• 
193 50 

77 99 

193 57 

33 75 

15 00 



19,642 44 



60 00 



298 


75 


78 


54 


15 


15 


7 


00 



,428 55 $485,552 76 



41 



Amounts brought forward, 
Water Maintenance account, two 
months' salarj'^ of Superintend- 
ent, charged Water Works 
account when paid, 

Support of Poor. 

Received for support of pauper in 
Charlestown Almshouse, 

For support of paupers : — 
Of State Treasurer, 
City of Boston, 
City of Cambridge, 
City of Gloucester, 
City of Chelsea, 
Cit}" of Lawrence, 
Cit3^ of Lowell, 
Town of Abington, 
Town of Canton, 
Town of Bracut, 
Town of Marblehead, 
Town of Medford, 
Town of Melrose, 
Town of N a tick. 
Town of Quincy, 
Town of Woburn, 
Town of Watertown, 

For board of paupers in Worces- 
ter Lunatic Asylum, 

Miscellaneous account, board of 
boys in Reform School, 

Overseers of the Poor, amount re- 
tained bj^ them from labor pa}^- 
rolls on highways account, etc., 
by reason of aid furnished labor- 
ers by orders for sundries. 

Amount carried forward, 



Sl,428 55 $485,552 76 



200 00 



120 85 

425 89 

1,620 15 

951 48 

51 67 

87 60 

33 25 

9 18 

127 96 

77 22 

117 19 

> 40 52 

42 73 

41 21 

54 82 

10 00 

138 41 

17 00 

67 09 

39 42 



3,161 20 



1,628 55 



7,234 84 
$494,416 15 



42 

Amomit brought fonoard^ $494,416 15 

State of Massachusetts (State Aid). 
Amount paid in 1875, $4,038 40 

1876, 4,254 12 



8,292 52 
Receivable from the State Dec. 1,1877, 4,254 12 



Received, 4,038 40 

Taxes, 

Assessed in 1873, uncollected Dec. 31, 

1875, 3,172 40 
Abatements, $2,780 40 
Uncollected Dec. 30, 

1876, 384 00 

3,164 40 



00 



Assessed in 1874, uncollected Dec. 31, 

1875, 36,298 50 
Abatements, « 3,800 15 
Uncollected Dec. 30, 

1876, 1,011 00 
Credited in Real Es- 
tate Liens account, 4,621 50 

9,432 65 



26,865 85 



Assessed in 1875, uncollected Dec. 31, 

1875 154,437 20 

Abatements, 1,670 30 

Uncollected Dec. 30, 

1876, 66,457 68 

68,127 98 



86.309 22 



Araount carried forward, $498,454 55 



43 

Amount brought forward, $498,454 55 

Assessed in 1876 on $26,573,400.00 

valuation, at $18.60 perthousand 

and on 5,105 polls, amount as 

per assessors' warrant, $504,475 24 

Abatements, $7,923 88 

Uncollected Dec. 30, 

1876, 176,097 64 

184,021 52 

320,453 72 

Received for 1873, 8 00 

1874, 26,865 85 

1875, 86,309 22 

1876, 320,453 72 



433,636 79 



Temporary Loans. 

Amounts borrowed b}' authorit}' of the 
City Council on city notes, and 
of the following named : — 

Feb. 19. — Commissioners of the 
Sinking Funds of the Cit^,^ of 
Cambridge, 13,500 00 

March 21. — Brewster, Basset & 

Co., 105,000 00 

April 1. — Boston Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank, 50,000 00 

April 3. — Maverick National 

Bank, 25,000 00 

May 5. — Brewster, Basset & Co. 10,000 00 

May 27. — Warren Institution for 

Savings, 50,000 00 

June 1. — Boston Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank, 100,000 00 

June 1. — Aaron Sargent, Trustee, 20,000 00 



Amounts carried forward, $373,500 00 $932,091 34 



44 

Amounts brought forward, $373,500 00 $932,091 34 
Amounts borrowed. — Continued : 

June 14. — Bunker Hill National 

Hank, 50,000 00 
July 1. — Boston Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank, 100,000 00 
July 1. — Charles Wilson, 5,000 00 
July 1. — Mrs. M. M. Runey, 2,000 00 
July 1. —Brewster, Basset & Co. 35,000 00 
Oct. 20. — Brewster, Basset & Co. 165,000 00 
Dec. 9. — Mrs. S. E. Fiske, 4,000 00 
Dec. 30. — Aaron Sargent and 

E E. Adams, trustees, 5,000 00 

Dec. 30. — Aaron Sargent, trustee, 20,000 00 
Dec. 30. — Warren Institution for 

Savings, 50,000 00 

Dec. 30. — Brewster, Basset &Co. 30,000 00 

Dec. 30. — Charles Wilson, 5,000 00 

844,500 00 



Water Maintenance. 
Received of the Mj^stic Water Board of 
Boston, return on water rates : — 
For 1875, 30 per cent on $2,391 61 717 48 

1876, 15 " 20,000 00 3,000 00 

20 " 10,000 00 2,000 00 

. 25 " 10,000 00 2,500 00 

30 " 6,835 25 2,050 58 



"Water Service Assessments. 
For 1873, uncollected Dec. 31, 1875, $111 11 

Uncollected Dec. 31, 1876, 51 50 



For 1874, uncollected Dec. 31, 1875, 
UucoUected Dec. 31, 1876, 



10,268 06 



59 


61 


393 
193 


14 
62 


199 


52 



Amount carried forward, $1,786,859 40 



45 

Amount hronght forward $1,786,859 40 

For 1875, uncollected Dec. 31, 1875, $1,261 75 
Uncollected Dec. 31, 1876, 311 41 



950 34 



For 1876, as per certificates from the 
Superintendent of the Water 
Works, 2,973 91 

Uncollected Dec. 31, 1876, 819 08 



2,154 83 



Received for 1873, 








59 61 


1874, 








199 52 


1875, 








950 34 


1876, 








2,154 83 


Water Services. 




Received of Miscellaneous 


account for 




labor and materials used 


on Cen- 




tral Hill land. 








$14 55 


For pipe, repairs. 


materials sold. 




etc., 








43 60 



3,364 30 



58 15 



Total receipts, $1,790,281 85 



46 



Table E. 

DISBURSEMENTS DURING THE YEAR 1876. 

County of Middlesex. 

Paid Coaiity Treasurer, count}^ tax, $9,698 51 

Estate belonging to M. Doherty or 
Owner unknown. 

Paid Miscellaneous account for sum- 
mons, posting, poundage, record- 
ing, etc., 38 10 

Fire Department. 

Paid James R. Hopkins, Chief Engi- 
neer, salary, $600 00 

Four Assistant Engineers, sala- 
ries, 

Clerk of Engineers, salary, 

Steamer Engine Co., 

John E. Wool Hose Co., 

Winter Hill Hose Co., 

George H. Foster Hose Co., 

George O. Brastow Hose Co., 

R. A. Vinal Hook and Ladder 
Co., 

Steamer Engineer, 

Steamer Fireman, 

Seven Drivers, 

Substitute Drivers, 

W. S. & G. O. Wiley, for horse. 

City of Boston, water-rates for 
h3"d rants, 

Water-rates for buildings, 

Charles Williams, for telegraph 
supplies, 



Amounts carried forward, $16,057 74 $9,736 61 



800 


00 


50 


00 


837 


50 


766 


67 


795 


00 


773 


75 


780 


25 


1,609 


58 


1,000 


00 


780 


00 


5,460 


00 


195 


00 


250 


00 


1,176 


00 


110 


00 


73 


99 


$16,057 


74 



47 



Amounts brought forward^ 
Paid Walworth Manf'g. Co., for zinc, 
P'arrar, FoUett & Co., for wire, 
Gamewell & Co., for telegraph 

fixture, 
Merrill Bros., for vitriol, 
Stearns & George, for vitriol, etc. 
Union Glass Co., for battery jars, 
Hunneman & Co., repairs on 

apparatus. 
Cook, Rymes & Co., repairs on 

apparatus, 
Sundry bills, repairs on apparatus, 
Seward Dodge, blacksmithing. 
Sundry bills, for horseshoeing, 
Nathan Tufts & Son, for grain, 
J. F. Ham, for hay and straw, 

A. H. Dix, for hay and straw. 
Brine & Clark, for hay and straw, 
L. G. Burnham & Co., for hay, 
D. Brooks, for hay. 

Sundry bills, for harness-work, 
Sundry bills, for washing, 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., for gas, 
Charlestown Gas Co., for gas, 
J. Bo3'd & Sons, for fire hats, 
H. A. Winship, for fire hat, 
C. Easter & Co., for fire hat, 
Thomas HoUis, for medicine, soap, 

etc., 
H. R. Bishop & Co., for ladders, 
J. E. Farwell & Co., for printing, 
S. Walker & Co., for oil, 
H. P. Trask, for whips, 

B. B. David, for whips, 

Amounts carried forward 



6,057 


74 


101 


25 


28 


35 


4 


50 


40 


50 


86 


25 


19 


58 



1,736 61 



565 69 



108 


91 


157 


94 


190 


77 


161 


95 


571 


31 


380 


80 


86 


82 


322 


86 


188 


04 


80 


63 


136 


44 


104 


15 


259 


^^ 


119 


63 


95 


25 


6 


50 


5 


50 


66 


88 


21 


60 


52 


75 


18 


50 


12 


00 


17 


50 


$20,070 25 



$9,736 61 



221 


25 


79 


20 


365 


11 


49 


00 


42 


00 


18 


00 


14 


00 



48 

Amounts hrouglit fonvard, $20,070 25 $9,736 61 

Paid Savage & Burnham, inspection of 

boilers, 12 00 

Out-of-town Engine Cos., for re- 
freshments, 80 00 

Sundry Insurance Cos., premiums 
of insurance. 

Brine & Clark, for fuel, 

L. G. Burnham & Co., for fuel, 

J. H. Pray, Sons & Co., for carpet- 
ing, 

J. S. Paine, for furniture, 

E. H Brabrook, for chairs, 
Thomas Kemp, for lounge, 
Brintnall & Osgood, for window 

shades, 10 10 

L. C Chase & Co , for blankets, 

etc. 

D. E. Owen & Co., for '' hitch," 
Murdock Parlor Grate Co., for 

stall-guards, etc. 
Bubier & Co., for stall-guards, 
N. Harding, for fire badges, 
S. D. Kelley, for plans, 

E. Clement & Co., for lumber, 

8. W. Fuller, for lumber. 

Page & Littlefield, for lumber. 

Cutter & Parker, for doors. 

Page & Littlefield, carpenter work, 

Albert Caswell, carpenter work, 

Elijah Walker, carpenter work, 

Sundry bills, for repair on buildings, 

James Driscoll, labor on drains. 

Public Park Betterment Assess- 
ment account, assessment on 
Winter Hill Hose House, 24 30 



38 


85 


12 


00 


19 


80 


24 


75 


33 


75 


15 


00 


37 


23 


36 


00 


12 


05 


15 


25 


440 


03 


168 


45 


58 


50 


152 


43 


14 


25 



Amounts carried forward, $22,063 55 $9,736 61 



49 

Amounts brought forward^ $22,063 55 $9,736 61 

Paid Sullivan & Co , plumbing, 

J. W. Drake, plumbing, 

T. W. Littlefield, plumbing, 

Boston Elastic Fabric Co., for 
hose, 

Stephen Sible3% for 500 ft. hose, 

Blake Hose Co., for 500 ft. hose, 

J. A. Merrifield, for stove-pipe, 
etc. 

J. E. Parsons, for hardware, etc. 

Charles Holmes & Son, hardware, 
etc. 

Sundr}^ bills, for bedclothing, 

Sundry bills, for brooms, brushes, 

etc. 76 33 

Sundry bills, for hardware, express- 
ing, stationery, labor, etc. 183 65 

23,613 65 



$22,063 


55 


14 


69 


10 


65 


21 


23 


19 


00 


500 


00 


600 


00 


16 


25 


59 


69 


14 


12 


34 


49 



Funded Debt. 

Paid Sidewalk Bond No. 4, 10,000 00 
City Bonds Nos. 19, 20 to 30, 

and 45 to 48, 101,000 00 

Water Bonds, Nos. 14 and 15, 60,000 00 



171,000 00 



Health Department. 

Paid C L. O'Neil, for removing house 
offal 6 months to June 26, 
Henry Gray, for removing house 

offal 6 months to Dec. 26, 
P. W. Skinner, services in small- 
pox cases, 
C. W. Learned & Co., for disin- 
fectant. 



2,250 


00 


900 


00 


171 


50 


11 


50 



Amounts carried forward, $3,333 00 $204,350 26 

4 



221 


25 


79 


20 


365 


11 


49 


00 


42 


00 


18 


00 


14 


00 



48 

Amounts brought fonoard, $20,070 25 $9,736 61 

Paid Savage & Burnbam, inspection of 

boilers, 12 00 

Out-of-town Engine Cos., for re- 
freshments, 80 00 

Sundry Insurance Cos., premiums 
of insurance. 

Brine & Clark, for fuel, 

L. G. Burnham & Co., for fuel, 

J. H. Pray, Sons & Co., for carpet- 
ing, 

J. S. Paine, for furniture, 

E. H Brabrook, for chairs, 

Thomas Kemp, for lounge, 

Brintnall & Osgood, for window 
shades, 10 10 

L. C Chase & Co , for blankets, 
etc. 

D. E. Owen & Co., for '' hitch," 
Murdock Parlor Grate Co., for 

stall-guards, etc. 
Bubier & Co., for stall-guards, 
N. Harding, for fire badges, 
S. D. Kelley, for plans, 

E. Clement & Co., for lumber, 
S. W. Fuller, for lumber. 
Page & Littlefield, for lumber. 
Cutter & Parker, for doors. 
Page & Littlefield, carpenter work, 
Albert Caswell, carpenter work, 
Elijah Walker, carpenter work, 
Sundry bills, for repair on buildings, 
James Driscoll, labor on drains, 
Public Park Betterment Assess- 
ment account, assessment on 

Winter Hill Hose House, 24 30 

Amounts carried forward, $22,063 55 $9,736 61 



38 


85 


12 


00 


19 


80 


24 


75 


33 


75 


15 


00 


37 


23 


36 


00 


12 


05 


15 


25 


440 


03 


168 


45 


58 


50 


152 


43 


14 


25 



49 

Amounts hrouglit forward, $22,063 55 $9,736 61 

Paid Sullivan & Co , plumbing, 

J. W". Drake, plumbing, 

T. W. Littlefield, plumbing, 

Boston Elastic Fabric Co., for 
hose, 

Stephen Sibley, for 500 ft. hose, 

Blake Hose Co., for 500 ft. hose, 

J. A. Merrifield, for stove-pipe, 
etc. 

J. E. Parsons, for hardware, etc. 

Charles Holmes & Son, hardware, 
etc. 

Sundrj^ bills, for bedclothing. 

Sundry bills, for brooms, brushes, 
etc. 

Sundry bills, for hardware, express- 
ing, stationery, labor, etc. 



$22,063 


55 


14 


69 


10 


65 


21 


23 


19 


00 


500 


00 


600 


00 


16 


25 


59 


69 


14 


12 


34 


49 


76 


33 


183 


65 



Funded Debt. 

Paid Sidewalk Bond No. 4, 10,000 00 
City Bonds Nos. 19, 20 to 30, 

and 45 to 48, 101,000 00 

Water Bonds, Nos. 14 and 15, 60,000 00 



23,613 65 



171,000 00 



Health Department. 

Paid C L. O'Neil, for removing house 
offal 6 months to June 26, 

Henry Gray, for removing house 
offal 6 months to Dec. 26, 

P. W. Skinner, services in small- 
pox cases, 

C. W. Learned & Co., for disin- 
fectant. 



2,250 


00 


900 


00 


171 


50 


11 


50 



Amounts carried forward^ $3,333 00 $204,350 26 

4 



11 


00 


34 


53 


127 


55 


210 


84 


78 


01 


12 


00 



50 

Amounts brought forward, $3,333 00 $204,350 26 

Paid M. C. Parkhurst, amount paid for 
burying dead animals, 

George McLaughlin, for groceries, 

Portland Stone Ware Co., for 
drain pipe, 

D. Brooks, mason work, 

F. Mongan, for la^dng drain, 

J. E. Farvvell & Co , printing, 

B. Spooner, for printing and ad- 
vertising, 13 90 

Somerville Water Works account, 

damage to water-pipe, 15 00 

Sewers account, for constructing 
cesspools in Ward and Earle 
Streets, 123 66 

W. B. Munroe, for teaming ashes, 152 00 

John Hicke}^, teaming ashes, 72 00 

John Riley, teaming ashes, 20 00 

Timothy O'Brien, teaming ashes, 36 00 

Patrick Fay, labor in removal of 

ashes, 58 50 

James Skehan, labor in removal of 



ashes, 


18 00 


Daniel Radlej^ teaming ashes, 


48 00 


Sundry bills, for advertising, print- 




ing, carriage-hire, etc.. 


21 90 


Highways. 




Paid laborers. 


20,695 07 


Laborers (from overseers of the 




poor). 


9,488 00 


Laborers (from Committee on Sol- 




diers' Relief), 


258 00 


C. L. Heywood, for gravel, 


1,674 00 


Amounts carried forward^ 


$32,115 07 



4,385 89 



51 



Amounts brought forward^ 

Paid Jesse Simpson, for gravel, 
Samuel Walcott, " 
Jeremiah McOart}", for stone, 
F. W. Mead, " 

Boston & Maine R. R. Co., for 

transportation of gravel, 
Fitchburg R, R. Co., for transpor- 
tation of gravel, 
W. A. Sanborn, for brick, 
L. Winch, " 

D. Gore & Son, for paving blocks, 
J. W. Kidney, for edgestones, 
Samuel Walcott, for filling mate- 
rial on Mystic Avenue, 
A. H. Dix, for drain-pipe, 
Owen Cunningham, for teaming, 
John Carr, " 

J. McCarroU, " 

F. Buttemer, "' 

C. Burke, '' 

James Htzpatrick, " 

John Welch, " 

Jeremiah McCartj^ " 
Dennis Murray, " 

Martin Gill, " 

Patrick Farrell, '' 

John McKenna, " 

John Riley, '' 

Abigail O'Brien, " 

Elizabeth Skehan, *' 

John Hickey, " 

F. Mongan, " 

Henry Gray, " 

W. B. Munroe, " 

Amounts carried forward^ 



$32,115 07 $208,736 15 

237 00 

44 80 

129 60 

1,170 00 

5,885 51 



154 


94 


14 


50 


38 


50 


211 


96 


8 


40 


269 


50 


7 


79 


260 


00 


72 


00 


294 


00 


182 


00 


240 


00 


180 


00 


132 


00 


112 


00 


60 


00 


250 


00 


184 


00 


134 


00 


162 


00 


155 


00 


324 


50 


775 


00 


509 


50 


905 


50 


280 


00 



$45,499 07 $208,736 15 



2 






$45,499 07 $208,736 15 


h 


242 00 




112 00 




174 00 




172 00 




78 00 




76 00 


g. 


498 15 




110 45 




40 30 




14 75 



Amounts brought forward^ 

Paid Michael Norton, for teaming, 

D. Radley, " 
Thos. Tighe, " 
Mary Crimmins, " 
Margaret A^'lward, '' 
Mary Mahoney, " 
Seward Dodge, blacksmitliing, 
M. Lynch, " 
T. McGrath, '' 
Doty & Collins, " 
Timothj^ Brennan, sharpening 

tools, 30 50 

Cook, R^^mes & Co., hammers, 

picks, etc., 
J. Anthony, hammer handles, 
Parker & G-annett, shovels, etc., 
Edward O'Brien, horseshoeing, 
J. Leland, repairing carts, etc., 
Henry Gra}^ use of horse, 
G. H. Sampson, for powder, 
N. Tufts & Son, for grain, 

E. M. Marshall, for ha}^ and straw, 

F. P. Ladd, "- '' 
J. P. Ferr3% for ha}^, 
W. M. Hadley, for coal, etc., 
Frank Shute & Co., for bellows, 
J. Bartley & Co., for oil, etc., 
Morse & Whyte, for gravel screens, 
Mark Leigbton, for carpenter 

work, 
S. W. Fuller, for lumber, 
F. W. Hannaford, for harness work, 
N. L. Pennock, '' -' 

A. B. McDonald, " *' 

Amounts carried forward, $50,728 14 $208,736 15 



222 


15 


70 


00 


143 92 


340 


71 


227 


75 


108 


75 


291 


50 


1,398 


24 


324 


93 


43 


62 


41 


80 


62 


27 


14 


00 


.42 


31 


17 


00 


153 


87 


39 


71 


62 


01 


81 


23 


5 


15 



53 

Amounts brougJit forward, S50,728 14 $208,736 15 

Paid Town of Medford, half cost main- 
taining Middlesex Ave. in 1875, 191 65 

City of Boston, water rates at 

stables, 20 00 

F. Davis, for anvil and hammer, 10 00 

Stephen Adams, for brooms, 8 00 

C. H. Nichols, for axle-grease, 9 84 

Fire Association of Philadelphia, 
premium insurance on city 
stables, 120 00 

H. A. Carney, for trees, 77 00 

Doe & Hunnewell, for lumber, 16 91 

M. Eagan, for watering streets, 15 00 

Sargent & Adams, use of land for 

gravel dump, 100 00 

Heirs of Samuel Rand, for use 
of land, 

E Barrj^ for mowing grass, 

J. A. Cummings & Co., printing. 

Hooper, Lewis & Co., for station- 
ery, 

B. Spooner, advertising, 

Lewis Putnam, veterinary surgeon, 

H. W. Raymond, for hardware, 

Somerville Water Works account, 

setting watering trough, 33 75 

Town of Winchester, tax on gravel 

land, 9 43 

Towft of Wakefield, tax on gravel 

land, 23 89 

Town of Waltham, tax on gravel 
land, 168 30 

Franklin Henderson, Superintend- 
ent of Streets, 1,350 00 



10 


00 


21 


00 


15 


50 


13 


95 


6 


30 


8 


00 


16 


61 



Amounts carried forward, $52,973 27 $208,736 15 



56 



Amount brought forward^ 
Highways (Concord Avenue). 
Paid Highways account, cost of con- 
structing from Prospect St. to 
Springfield St. 

Highways (Concord Avenue). 
Paid laborers, 

Highways account, for stone used 
between Springfield St. and Leon 
St. 

Martin Gill, teaming, 

Owen Cunningham, teaming, 

Christopher Burke, 

Michael Norton, 

John Welch, 

Hemy Gray, 

Thomas Tighe, 

Abigail O'Brien, 

James McCarroU, 

Jeremiah McCart}', 

Patrick Farrell, 

Mar}^ Mahoney, 

Mary Crimmins, 

Highways (Glen Street). 
Paid Highwa}' account, cost of construct- 
ing from Flint St. to Oliver St. 

Highways (Newton Street). 
Paid Highways account, cost of con- 
structing, 

Highways (Highland Avenue 
Widening). 

Paid Martin Moore, verdict of Court 

for land damages. 

Amounts carried forward^ 



$273,606 92 



162 00 



180 


00 


16 


00 


8 


00 


8 


00 


8 


00 


12 


00 


8 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


8 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 



3,045 25 



482 00 



151 80 



953 50 



1 17 



17 $278,239 47 



57 



Amounts brought forward, 
aid costs of Court, 

Sundry persons, witness fees in 

Moore case, 
S. Richards, for raising Elizabeth 

Blackbird's house, 
George Blackbird, carpenter work 

on do., 
Patrick Terry, mason work on do., 
J. \V. Drake, plumbing at do., 
Francis Mongan, filling material 

at do., 108 75 



u 


17 


$278,239 


47 


110 


76 






40 


80 






60 


00 






150 


00 






170 


00 






10 


55 







652 03 



Highways (Middlesex Avenue). 

Paid County Treasurer, Count^^ Com- 
missioners' assessment for city's 
proportion of constructing bridge 
over M^^stic River, 3,401 12 

Highways (Milk Street Widening). 
Paid Patrick Terr3\ for land taken and 
for damages, 
Francis Mongan, for land taken 

and for damages, 
City of Cambridge, for filling at 
Miller's River, 

Highways (Broadway Widening). 
Paid sundry persons, witness fees in 
*'Holt" case, 
G. W. Colbath, for estimates in 

'^Holt" case, 
G. W. Colbath, Jr., for estimates 

''Holt" case, 
George R. Kelso, expert in " Holt" 
case, 

Amou7it carried forward, 



500 


00 




150 


00 




319 


70 


969 70 


17 


60 


*jyj%/ t \J 


12 


50 




12 


50 




25 


00 


67 60 










$283,329 92 



58 

Amount brought forward^ $283,329 92 

Interest. 

(On Funded Debt.) 

Paid coupons of Sidewalk Loan Bonds, 
Nos. 4 to 10 inclusive ; Town 
Loan Bonds, Nos. 1 and 3 to 8, 
inclusive ; School Loan Bonds, 
Nos. 2 to 4, inclusive ; and City 
Loan Bonds, Nos. 1 to 17 and 
19 to 187, inclusive ; and Sewer 
Loan Bonds, Nos. 1 to 7, inclu- 
sive : — 
$140,000.00, 1 year at 7 per cent, $9,800 00 

46,000.00, 6 months at 7 per cent, 1,610 00 

891,000.00, 1 year at 6^ per cent, 57,915 00 

25,000.00, 6 months at 6^ percent, 812 50 

115,000.00, 1 year at 6 per cent, 6,900 00 

39,854.00, 1 year at 5J per cent, 2,192 00 

61,000.00, 6 months at SJ percent, 1,677 50 
35,000,00, 6 months at 5 per cent, 875 00 



$81,782 00 



Less on coupon, not for 

full time, $49 00 

Less coupons, not paid 

(credited Sundry 

Persons account 

in Table C), 325 00 



374 00 



81,408 00 



(On Temporary Loans,) 

Paid Brewster, Basset & Co., on notes 
for $105,000.00, 11 days at 5^ 
per cent, 176 46 



Amounts carried forward, $176 46 $283,329 92 



59 

Amounts brought fonvard $176 46 $283,329 92 

Paid Boston Five Cent Savings Bank, 
on note for $50,000, 3 months 
3 daj^s at 5 per cent, 645 83 

Warren Institution for Savings, on 
note for $50,000, 6 months at 
5 percent, 1,250 00 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank, 

. on note for $100,000, 6 months 

at 5 per cent, 2,500 00 

Aaron Sargent, trustee, on note for 
$20,000.00, 5 months and 1 day 
at 5 per cent, 419 44 

Bunker Hill Bank, on note for 
$50,000.00, 6 months at 5 per 
cent, 1,250 00 

People's National Bank, on note 
for $20,000.00, 6 months and 
3 days at 5 per cent, 508 33 

Charles Wilson, on note for 
$5,000.00, 6 months and 1 day at 
5 per cent, 125 69 

Brewster, Bassett & Co., on note 
for $10,000.00, 1 month and 
26 days at 5^ per cent, 85 56 

Commissioners of the Sinking 
Fund of the City of Cambridge, 
on note for $13,500.00, 4 mos. 
and 12 days at 4 per cent, 198 00 

Warren Institution for Savings, 
on note for $50,000.00, 6 months 
at 4 per cent, 1,000 00 

and 1 month and 3 daj's at 3J 
per cent, 160 42 



Amounts carried forward, $8,319 73 $283,329 92 



60 

Amounts brought forwai d, $8,319 73 $283,329 92 

Paid Boston Five Cents Savings Bank, 

on note for $50,000.00, 8 mos. 

at 5 per cent. 1,666 67 

on note for $100,000.00, 6 mos. 

at 4 per cent, 2,000 00 

on note for » 100,000 00, 5 mos. 

at 3^ per cent, 1,458 33 

Mrs. M. M. Runey, on note for 

$2,000.00, 5 months at ^ per 

cent, 29 17 

Maverick National Bank, on note 

for $25,000.00, 8 months and 3 

days at 5 per cent, " 843 75 

Bunker Hill National Bank, on 

note for $50,000.10, 6 months 

and 3 daj's at 5 per cent, 1,016 67 

Aaron Sargent, trustee, on note for 

$20,000.00, 6 months at 4 per 

cent, 

and 1 month at 3^ per cent, 
Charles Wilson, on note for 

$5,000.00, 5 months at 4 per 

cent, 

and 1 month at 3| per cent, 
Mrs. Sarah E. Fiske, on note for 

$4,000.00, 21 days at 3| per cent, 8 16 



400 


00 


58 


33 


83 


33 


14 


58 



1 



15,898 72 

On Funded Debt, 81,408 00 

Temporary Loans, 15,898 72 

97,306 72 

Liquor Licenses. 

Paid State Treasurer, one fourth of 

sum received for licenses, 431 25 



Amount carried forward^ $381,067 89 



61 

Amount brought forward^ $381,067 89 

Miscellaneous. 
Paid J. E. Farwell & Co , for printing 

annual reports 1875, 
Sundry bills, for printing, 
Alfred Mudge & Son, for printing 

Municipal Register, 
J. A. Cummings & Co., for printing, 
Horace Partridge, for printing, 
Berry & Bouve, for printing, 
George B. King, for printing, 
H. W. Pitman, advertising, 
Thomas Scott, '' 

J. O. Hayden, ^' 

R. M. Palsifer & Co. '' 
Bourne Spooner, '* 

advertising ordinances, 
M. R. Warren, for stationer}*. 
Ward & Gay, '' 

Cutter, Tower & Co., " 
Hooper, Lewis & Co., " 
H. T. Johnson & Co., '' 
City Engineer's Assistants, car 

fares, 31 80 

Geo. A. Kimball, use of team as 

City Engineer, 200 00 

Ward Officers, 136 00 

J. C. Magoun, sealer of weights 

and measures, 100 00 

C. A. Small, pound-keeper for 

1875 and 1876, 50 00 

Cambridge Gas Light Co., for gas 

in City Hall, 
Brine & Clark, for fuel, 
L. G. Burnham & Co., for fuel. 

Amounts carried forward^ $4,362 42 $381,067 89 



$687 50 


389 


38 


344 


92 


282 


00 


112 


75 


16 


50 


118 


40 


3 


00 


75 


00 


8S 


30 


9 


76 


220 


49 


208 


65 


463 


36 


47 


88 


14 


25 


72 


35 


6 


00 



458 


73 


31 


50 


193 


90 



62 



Amounts hr ought forward^ 

Paid Thomas Long, for carpenter work, 

T. W. Driscoll, " " 

Albert Caswell, " " 

Ingalls & Kendrickson, repairing 
heating apparatus, 

A. M. Sibley, mason work, 

S. J. Wood, repairing locks, etc., 

H. W. Raymond, hardware, etc., 

Howe & Flint, hardware, etc., 

Chelmsford Foundry Co., for iron 

work at City Hall, 20 75 

G. W. Manning, painting flag- 
staffs, 
labor on staff, 

J. W. Spear, labor on flag-staffs, 
washing windows, etc., 
labor, 

W. J. London, expressing, 

J. L. Taylor, carpenter work at 

, City Hall, 

H. W. Kimball, sawing wood, and 
labor at City Hall, 

L. M. Maynard, for labor, manure, 
etc., 

Horatio McBean, painting and 
glazing, 

Homer, Lane & Co., for cuspa- 
dores, 

Charles Holmes & Son, for brooms, 
brushes, etc., 

Storage on stoves, 

Cit}^ of Lowell, for board of tru- 
ants, 370 90 

State Reform School, for board of 

boys, 78 00 



$4,362 42 


S381,067 


89 


47 


30 






45 


13 






7 


30 






3 


23 






21 


75 






18 


00 






19 


97 






16 


95 







52 


00 


21 


00 


12 


00 


19 


00 


8 


15 


27 


25 


660 


89 


61 


65 


67 


50 


83 


90 


8 


33 


15 


57 


9 


00 



Amounts carried forward, $6,057 94 $381,067 89 



63 

Amounts brought forward, $6,057 94 $381,067 89 

Paid Support of Poor account, amount 

paid from that account for board 

of boys in State Reform School, 
Patrick Ratfert}', return of deaths, 
H. B. Runey, '^ ^' 

B. F. Wyeth, '' '' 

Martin Binne}^ clerical services, 
Douglas Frazar, extra compen- 
sation as Auditor, 
Janitors at ward meetings, 
G. F. Morgan, for abstracts from 

Middlesex deeds, to Ma}' 1, 
Geo. I. Vincent, for abstracts from 

Middlesex deeds from May 1, 
Norton Bros., for funeral wreath, 

etc. 
Jail us Mann, maintenance of team 

amount paid witness fees in sun- 

dr}* cases, 54 20 

amount paid for team for wit- 
nesses, 

w^atching, etc., at City Hall, 

amount paid for washing, hard- 
ware, etc., 
M. J. Lincoln, for washing. 
Sundry persons, for ringing bells, 

1 7th of June and 4th of July, 33 00 

Chelsea Brass Band, music, June 

17, 
Lynn Cornet Band, music, July 4, 
J. H. McCarty, music, July 4, 
999th Battery, for firing salutes, 
A. L. Sanborn, carriage hire, July 

4, 

Amounts carried forward, $8,022 86 $381,067 89 



39 


42 


69 


25 


100 


25 


2 


50 


119 


00 


50 


00 


44 


00 


214 


85 


133 


33 


25 


00 


500 


00 



4 


00 


75 


75 


63 


46 


14 


90 



82 


00 


50 


00 


180 


00 


100 


00 


10 


00 



64 

Amounts brought forward, $8,022 85 $381,067 89 

Paid B. M. Wedger, for fire- works, 90 00 

N. Harding, for goblets, 14 27 

John Flannigan, for building band- 
stands and staging for fire- works, 24 75 
J. Young and H. W. Kimball, 

services at fire works, 5 00 

D. F. Hulsman, for building band- 
stand, 15 00 

Caldwell & Odiorne, for flag-staff, 225 00 

Joseph Young, for building band- 
stand, 15 00 

Cyrus Carpenter & Co., for venti- 
lator, 14 75 

Jesse Simpson, for release of tax- 
titles, 153 72 

Sundry persons, services as ap- 
praisers of estates, 60 00 

Thomas Cunningham, use of horse 

and carriage, 7 00 

Fairbanks, Brown & Co., for seal- 
er's scale and weights, 62 00 

Hurnham & Lowell, for bracket, 12 50 

N. Dennett, gas fixtures, 13 11 

E. B. Vreeland, clerical services 
on Park betterment assess- 
ments, 17 00 

T. M. Durell, clerical services on 

Park betterment assessments, 11 37 

County Commissioners, costs in 
case of Hadley for abatement on 
taxes, 100 00 

Dennis Mahoney, for damage to 

horse on highway, 50 00 

G. H. Koyce, for serving notices, 3 90 



Amounts carried forward, $8,917 22 $381,067 89 



65 

Amounts brought forward, 
Paid L. L. Parker, for serving writs, 
etc., 

North British and Mercantile Ins. 
Co., premium of insurance on 
City Hall, 

John Turner & Co., labor on 
boundary stone, 

B. F. Thompson, labor on bound- 
ary stone, 

R. M. Yale, for awnings, 

Asa Durgin, for ice, 

F. G. Williams, for registering 
births, 

J. H. Bufford's Sons, for printing 
bonds, 

Somerville Water Works account, 
for standpipes, etc., for street 
watering purposes, 

Wm. H. Brine, for serving war- 
rants, etc., 

Martin for Gill, constructing drive- 
way in front of High School 
House, 

Hugh Carney, for trees in front of 
High School House, 

Water Services account, for water 
pipe at High School House, 

J. W. Kidney, for edgestones in 
front of High School House, 

John Turner, for granite work at 
High School House, 

Francis Mongan, for sodding, 
grading, etc., in front of High 
School House, 528 98 

Amounts carried forward, $11,979 08 $381,067 89 

5 



,917 


22 $381,067 89 


29 


40 


26 


40 


9 


56 


2 


25 


25 


00 


43 


30 


96 


00 . 


20 


00 


298 


75 


35 


00 


757 


72 


91 


00 


14 


55 


430 


95 


653 


00 



66 



Amounts brought forward^ 
Paid C. H. Dassance, for sign boards, 
A. J. Carter, for furniture, 
Flynn Bros., for chairs, etc., 

F. G. Williams, for de iveiing and 
adjusting tax bills, 

Charles Robinson, court fees, etc., 
8. C. Darling, court fees, etc., 

paid for map of Somerville, 
City of Boston, water rates at City 

Hall, 
Charles Pierce, for gas-fixtures at 

City Hall, 
E. R. Morse, for moving safe, 
H. R Taylor, for drawers for En- 
gineer's office, 
Post-Office, for postage stamps, 
I'ost 139, G. A. R., for momoiial 

day, 
Daniel Pratt's Sons, for clock, 
A. L. Sanborn, carriage hire, 
W. Daly & Son, carriage hire, 
Webb & Stevens, for lamp, 
J. A. Porter, damage to horse on 

Newton St., 
C. D. Eliot, sundry expenses as 

City Engineer, 

services of assistants in 1875 
in excess of appropriation, 

G. W. Lawson, carpenter work. 
Fire Association of Philadelphia, 

premiun of insurance on old Po- 
lice Station, 
A. E. Mann, substitute for City 
Messenger, 



11,979 


08 


$381,067 89 


9 


50 




25 


00 




59 


50 




350 


00 




199 


30 




80 


34 




11 


50 





50 00 

118 35 
6 00 

118 00 
79 00 

300 00 

20 00 

10 00 

12 00 

9 35 

37 50 

27 90 

352 26 
32 45 



17 50 



12 00 



Amounts carried forward, 



$13,916 53 $381,067 89 



67 

Amounts brought forward, $13,916 53 $381,067 89 

Paid L. A. Dimond, newspaper sub- 
scription, 9 00 

G. H. Buxton, carriage hire, 5 00 

Public Park Betterment Assess- 
ment account, assessment on 
City Ledge on Bond St , 159" 01 

Boston Belting Co., for hose, 17 20 

A. L. Lovejoy, damage by defect 

in highway, 14 50 

John H. Kenneson, damage from 

collision with tree in highway, 200 00 

E. H. Darling, for taking affidavits 

in bankrupt cases, 7 25 

C. B. Morton, for wire screens, 5 00 

Somerville Water Works ac- 
count, labor on watering trough 
and drinking fountain, 78 54 

John Wilson, services with assess- 
ors, 16 50 

Aaron Sargent, salary as treas. 
of Commissioners of Sinking 
Fund, 150 00 

John P. Healey, legal services, 35 00 

costs in lawsuit, 57 61 

Daily Advertiser, advertising, 7 00 

Sundry persons, serving notices, 8 00 

Frost & Adams, for tracing cloth, 

etc., 31 75 

Miscellaneous Watering Streets 
account, city's proportion of 
watering in certain streets, 434 25 

Putnam, Wiggin and Upton, for 

poultry for Christmas, 125 17 

Sturtevant Bros., for poultry for 

Christmas, 27 50 



Amounts carried forward, $15,804 81 $381,067 89 



68 



Amounts hr ought forward ^ 
Paid sundry persons, for expressing, 



$15,304 81 $381,067 89 



labor, oil, matches, etc., 


41 


97 


E. H. Brabrook, for desks, 


170 


00 

15 516 78 


Miscellaneous (Watering Streets). 




A-fJ ^XJ A. \J fl \J 


Paid Michael Eagan, for watering. 


4,490 


16 


City of Boston, for water, 


500 


00 


Sundry bills, for advertising, etc.. 


17 


00 

5 007 1 6 


Police. 




tJjKJxJ 1 1 IJ 


Paid M. C. Parkhurst, Chief, 


1,500 


00 


R. R. Perry, Captain, 


1,200 


00 


J. B. Alden, Lieutenant, 


200 


00 


Samuel R. Dow, Sergeant and 






Lieutenant, 


1,091 


72 


C. C. Folsom, patrolman and Ser- 






geant, 


1,039 


23 


S. A. Brown, patrolman. 


1,006 


50 


Geo. W. Bean, " 


1,006 


50 


C. D. Clark, " 


1,006 


50 


N. F. Caswell, " 


998 


25 


J. E. Coolidge, " 


216 


00 


J. G. Cunningham, " 


1,006 


50 


Isaac S. Campbell, '' 


781 


00 


C. C, Cavanaugh, " 


1,002 


38 


Geo. Cullis, "- 


987 


25 


Albert Fisk, " 


759 


50 


J. E. Fuller, " 


1,006 


50 


John Hafford, " 


998 


25 


M. H. Kinsley, " 


1,006 


50 


Ivan Laighton, '* 


1,003 


75 


Howard Lowell, '' 


286 


00 


John H. McGarr, '' 


921 


25 



Amounts carried forward^ 



$19,023 58 $401,591 83 



G9 



Amounts brought forward^ 


$19,023 58 %^ 


101,591 83 


Paid Edward McGarr, patrolman, 


1,006 50 




J. W. Oliver, 




1,006 50 




S. C. Rollins, 




1,001 00 




F. W. Slade, " 




1,006 50 




P. W. Skinner, ** 




882 75 




A. L. Staples, " 




1,003 75 




Rufus Slmte, " 




671 00 




L. H. Snow, " 




1,006 50 




0. H. Webber, " 


.■' 


992 75 




S. H. Whitcomb, 




1,006 50 




D. H. Rinn, *' 


(special). 


241 00 




B. F. Sheridan, '' 


(( 


377 00 




G. W. Bulfincb, '' 


(( 


93 00 


» 


Daniel Smith, " 


u 


96 00 




Chas. Muhlich, " 


(( 


10 00 




M. C. Parkhurst, lock-up 


keeper, 


200 00 




J. J. Giles, for w^ashing, 




47 22 




Asa Durgin, for ice, 1875 and 1876, 


60 00 




H. A. Winship, for billies. 


28 00 




Scovill Manuf. Co., for buttons, 


13 50 




Cutter, Tower & Co., for stationery, 


9 74 




Union Glass Co., for lanterns, 


15 00 




L. H. Brown, for carriage hire. 


22 50 




C. M. Blake, for newspapers. 


11 25 


• 


L. A. Dimond, " 




7 60 




G. H. Cowdin, for drugs 


., alcohol. 






etc.. 




17 43 




M. C. Parkhurst, amount 


; paid ad- 






vertising. 




6 00 




R. R. Perr3% for travelling 


; expenses. 


10 80 




James Bartlcy, for 


crackers. 






cheese, etc., 




124 84 




Sturtevant Bros., cheese, i 


soap, etc., 


27 42 




carriage hire, 




14 00 





Amounts carried forward^ 



$30,039 63 $401,591 83 



70 



Amounts brought forward. 
Paid G. H. Buxton, carriage hire, 

Sundry persons, for printing, medi- 
cal services, expressing, etc., 

Police Station Incidentals. 

Paid J. J. Giles, janitor, 

Cambridge Gas Light Co., gas bills, 
in old police station in 1875, 

Brine & Clark, for fuel, 

L. G. Burnliam& Co., for fuel, 

E. H. Brabrook, for furniture, 

J.J. Giles, for paint, oil, etc. 
for-washing, cleaning, etc., 
for labor, 

substitute janitor during vaca- 
tion, 

M. C. Parkhurst, for manure. 

Sidewalk Assessment account, 
sidewalk on Bow St., 

K. Hollings & Co., for chandelier, 

N. Dennett, for gas-fixtures, plumb- 
ing, etc., 

Mj'stic Water Board, water rates, 

Mark Leighton, for witness stand, 

Albert Caswell, for carpenter work, 

Leonard Arnold, " '' 

D. Brooks & Co , mason work, 

Edward Cahill, ^' 

Watson & Bisbee, for balusters, 

etc., 40 00 

Flj-nn Bros., for padding and re- 
pairing cells, 25 00 

M. W. Pierce & Co., gas-fixtures, 11 45 



$30,039 


63 i 


H01,591 83 


3 


00 




10 


21 


30,052 84 






900 


00 




1,016 


70 




72 


80 




214 


50 




173 


40 




180 


00 




25 


62 




40 


30 




7 


84 




10 


00 




7 


00 




136 


88 




48 


00 




67 


99 




41 


00 




14 


00 




84 


39 




54 


60 




17 


37 




40 


00 





Amounts carried forivard, $3,228 84 $431,644 67 



71 



Ainounts brought forward^ 
Paid Chelmsford Foundry Co., for horse 
posts, 
Enoch Robinson, for keys, etc., 
O. Newell, hanging bells, 
James Gwynn, expressing, 
J. H. Clough, register tops, 
Hariford Steam Boiler Ins. Co., 
premium of insurance on boiler, 
Seward Dodge, blacksmithing, 
H. W. Raymond, hardware, etc., 
Robert O. Dennett, for repairs, la- 
bor, etc., 
James Bartley, for oil, matches, 

etc., 
Howe & Flint, for repairing water 

cooler, 
S. J. Wood, for repairing lock, 

C. Holmes & Son, coal scoop, 

D. Cutter, for cleaning clock, 
Barker & Tibbetts, expressing, 
F. A. Titus, examining drains, etc., 

Public Library. 

Paid Lockwood, Brooks & Co., for 
books, 
James Campbell, for books, 

F. Leypoldt, for Library Journal, 
J. S. Paine, for table, 

G. B. Sargent, for stamp, 

J. A. Cummings & Co., for print- 
ing. 
H. V. Butler, for book, 
H. A. Adams, librarian, 
Lizzie Stevens, asst. librarian. 

Amounts carried forward , 



$3,223 84 $431,644 67 



15 


00 


17 


33 


4 


00 


10 


50 


7 


25 


20 


00 


20 


15 


13 


04 



50 91 



5 48 



4 


25 


1 


00 


1 


50 


2 


00 


1 


50 


1 


25 



3,404 00 



812 


89 


63 


94 


5 


00 


55 


20 


20 


00 


202 


75 


7 


50 


700 


00 


300 


00 



$2,167 28 $135,048 67 



72 



Amounts brought forward^ 
Paid E. G. Colman, asst. librarian, 
Herbert Ma3^nard, asst. " 
W. J. London, expressing, 

Public Park. 

Paid Cape Ann Granite Co., for iron 

fence, 
Laborers, 
J. Breck & Sons, for tools and 

grass seed, 
Hermann Grundel, for laying out 

and grading, 

for trees, shrubbery, etc., 
M. M. Fuller, for trees, 
Seman Klous, for loam and sods, 
Jeremiah McCarty, for loam, 
Martin Gill, " 

Daniel Kadley, 
John Carr, 
Charles Booth, 
Mrs. N. Baldwin, 
Mrs. A. O'Brien, 
Mrs. Mary Crimmins, " 
J. P. Prichard, '' 

Henry Gray, "• 

E. M. Marshall, '^ 

John Downey, " 

John Madden, " 

Jere Murphy, *' 

J. P. Prichard, for earth, 
Mrs. A. O'Brien, for teaming, 
Martin Gill, '' 

Jeremiah McCarty, *' 
Jeremiah McCarty, for stone, 

Amounts carried for ivard^ 



4( 



$2,167 28 $435,048 67 

39 45 

23 40 

26 25 
2,256 38 



9,942 38 
2,344 05 



308 89 



600 


00 


386 


30 


338 


00 


689 


06 


993 


08 


160 


95 


14 


80 


14 


06 


94 


72 


22 


20 


68 


82 


106 


93 


124 


32 


57 


72 


68 


82 


86 


95 


42 


55 


15 


91 


66 


25 


148 


62 


264 


50 


216 


50 


163 


20 



$17,339 58 $437,305 05 



73 

Amounts brought forward, $17,339 58 $437,305 05 

Paid Henry Gra}^, for stone, 336 00 

Boston and Maine Railroad Co., 

freight on gravel, 699 05 

Jeremiah McCarty, for earth, * 70 00 

Calvin Horton, boring for water, 22 75 

Braman, Dow & Co., fitting foun- 
tain, etc., 12 17 

Somerville Water Works account, 

for water gate, labor, etc., 193 57 

Chelmsford Foundry Co., for set- 
tees, etc., 

Doe & Hunnewell, for lumber, 

R. A. Melvin, for seats, 

H. M. Bird, for lamp posts, 

Charlestown Gas Co., lampposts. 

Tufts Bros., for lanterns, 

D. Gould, for burners, 

J. H. Hollis, for painting posts, 

D. Brooks & Co., for iron posts, 
etc., 

T. W. Littlefield, for water pots, 
J. Leland, for repairing roller, 

E. Bradbury, for printing, 
• Journal Newspaper Co., advertis- 
ing, 

Daily Advertiser, advertising, 
Mark Leighton, carpenter work, 
P. Harrington, sharpening tools, 
C. E. Edlefsen & Co., for broom, 
Thomas O'Conner, for estate 

taken, 
Edward A. Foster, for estate taken, 
Middlesex Registry, for recording 

deeds, 

Amounts carried forward, $22,045 18 $437,305 05 



75 


60 


16 


89 


55 


00 


171 


00 


90 


00 


122 


00 


75 


00 


6 


80 


8 


00 


9 


10 


3 


50 


5 


00 


2 


50 


2 


00 


23 


80 


3 


10 




87 


1,700 


00 


1,000 


00 


1 


90 



74 

Amounts brought forward, $22,045 18 $437,305 05 

Piiid Taxes account, taxes on land 

taken, 120 45 

Sidewalk Assessment account, 

sidewalk on Broadway, 222 12 

Highway Betterment Assessment 
account, assessment on Win- 
throp Ave., 3,070 00 

on Chauncey Ave., 3,267 50 

28,725 25 

The cost of the Park to 
Dec. 31, 1875, 
as by the report 
for that year was, $185,002 63 
Expended as above, 28,725 25 



Total, 


213,787 88 






Less credit as in 








Table D, 


1,392 21 






Cost of Park, 


212,395 67 




Public Park Maintenance. 




Paid L. B. Angier, labor, 




392 


50 


M W. Murphy, labor. 




392 


50 


George Gerrior, ** 




128 


24 


Michael Hicks, " 




58 


87 


Eichard Falvey, *' 




13 


50 


D. E. Lovering, resetting posts, 


44 


87 


John P. Prichard, manure, loam. 






etc., 




498 


50 


for granite roller, 




25 


00 


*' labor, 




48 


00 


"• earth, etc.. 




55 


30 


M. W. Murphy, for garden roller. 






etc., 




7 


20 



Amounts carried forward, $1,664 48 $466,030 30 



27 


13 


19 


80 


19 


80 


86 


68 


43 


00 


4 


00 


13 


68 


25 


00 


30 


00 


17 


50 



75 

Amounts bronght forward, $1,664 48 $466,030 30 

Paid Miscellaneous account, cost of 

summer and tool houses, 956 00 

Parker & Gannett, grass seed, 
tools, etc., 

Parker & Gannett, for lawn mower, 

J. T, Glines, for mowing machine, 

H. M. Hutchins & Co., for paint- 
ing summer and tool houses, 

T. Murphy, for shrubs, etc., 

Bishop & Bro., for ladder, 

L. G. Burnham & Co., for fuel, 

T. W. Littlefield, for oil tank, 

J. H. Clough, for plans and spe- 
cifications, 

D. K. Whiten, for tool handles, 

Gallishaw & Kennealy, for hand- 
cart, wheelbarrow and repair- 
ing tools, 

M. W. Murphy, for couplings, etc., 

R. A. Melvin, for settees, 

C. E. Edlefsen & Co., for tools, 
etc., 

Williams & Ashley, for naphtha, 

J. D. Gould, 

Perham & Rollins, expressing, 

Chelmsford Foundry Co., repair- 
ing settees, 6 00 

Wadsworth Bros. & Rowland, for 

alcohol, 2 83 

Doe & Hunnewell, sawing and 
planing lumber, 

G O. Burnham, for straw, 

Sundr}' persons, for matches, alco- 
hol, haixlware, and drain-pipe, 

Amount carried forward , 



So 


45 


5 


45 


70 


00 


15 


26 


9 


00 


6 


90 


5 


45 



3 00 




3 31 




2 52 






3,222 24 






$469,252 54 



76 



Amount brought forward^ 
Salaries. 
Paid Austin Bt'lknap, mayor, 

Charles ¥j. Oilman, city clerk, 
Aaron Sargent, treasurer, 
Geo. A. Kimball, city engineer, 
S. C. Darling, city solicitor, 
Donglas Frazar, auditor, 
A. H. Carvill, city physician, 
Geo. I. Vincent, clerk to assess- 
ors, 
Jairus Mann, city messenger, 
Solomon Davis, clerk of common 

council, 
Thomas Cunningham, assessor, 
John C. Tenney, " 

F. G. Williams, " 

Geo. Smith, assistant assessor, 
A. J. Taylor, " 

Amiel Colman, " 

Silas H. Holland, " 
E. M. Blaisdell, assistant to city 

clerk, 
S. A. Miles, assistant to treasurer. 
Engineer's assistants, 

School Contingent. 

Paid Joshua H. Davis, salar}^ as super- 
intendent of schools, 

E. A. Smith, truant oflScer, 

Janitors, 

Cit}^ of Boston, water rates, 

Thomas Groom & Co., for pens, 
pencils, etc., 

George B. King, for printing, 

Amounts carried forivardy 



$469,252 54 \ 



$1,000 00 

2,000 00 

2,700 00 

2,100 00 

1,800 00 

250 00 

700 00 

1,200 00 
1,300 00 

350 00 

700 00 

700 00 

700 00 

200 00 

200 00 

200 00 

200 00 

500 00 

500 00 

1,549 54 



18,849 54 



2,500 


00 


1,000 


00 


3,275 


41 


351 


42 


206 


25 


154 


96 



$7,488 04 $488,102 08 



77 

Amounts brovght forward, 
Paid J. E. Farwell & Co., for printing, 

for printing reports, 
J. L. Hammett, for books, etc., 
George B. King, " *' 
Crane & Perry & A. A. Perr}^, 

for books, 
R. S. Davis & Co., for books, 
George R. Bradford, " 
W. C. Clark, '' 

L. A. Dimond, " 

F. E. Bottoral}^ " 
H. T. Johnson & Co., " 
J. W. C. Gilman & Co., '' 

G. A. Southwortti, for printing, 
J. A. Cummings & Co., " 
N. S. Dearborn, printing diplomas, 
W. N. Goddard, paper, etc.. 
Bourne Spooner, advertising, 
H. W. Pitman, " 
J. O. Hayden, *' 
S. H. Hadley, tuning pianos, 
W. G. Shattuck, for inkstands, 
A. G. Whitcomb, '' 
E. H. Lincoln, photographing, 
Wakefield Rattan Co., for mats, 
O. F. Howe, for dusters, 
Charles Holmes & Son, for labor 

on stoves, mats, dusters, etc., 
Carpenter Bros., for brushes, etc., 
Charlestown Gas Co., for gas, 
Cambridge Gas Light Co., for gas, 
S. R. Burke, expressing, 
Thorpe's Express, "• 
Stilphen & Co., " 

Amounts carried forward, $10,382 53 $488,102 08 



$7,488 


04 $488,102 08 


15 


00 


111 


65 


1,192 


26 


517 


21 


58 


75 


20 


31 


13 


12 


170 


02 


21 


11 


48 


07 


5 


50 


3 


24 


35 


40 


7 


00 


36 


45 


15 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


9 


75 


10 


00 


17 


65 


17 


40 


60 


00 


23 


89 


19 


50 


71 


63 


5 


75 


93 


89 


254 


39 


7 


75 


5 


35 


19 


45 



78 

Amounts brought forward, $10,382 53 $488,102 08 

Paid Sarah Monahan, for cleaning, 8 67 

J. K. Abbott, for use of Claren- 
don Hall, 10 00 

J M. Davidson, care of Morse 

Hall and labor, 17 00 

D. H. Rinn, light furnished in 

school-house, 10 50 

Cambridge Water Board, water 
rates in Union and Webster 
School Houses, 19 00 

J. W. Cook, for moving piano, 3 00 

Sundry persons, for labor, express- 
ing, cleaning, etc., 10 95 

10,461 65 



School Teachers' Salaries. 
The salaries are as follows : — 

Principal in High School, 2,400 00 

First Assistant in High School, 1,800 00 

One Assistant, 1,200 00 

Three Assistants, each, 1,000 00 

One Grammar School teacher, 2,000 00 

Four Grammar School teachers, 

each, 1,800 00 

Assistants in Grammar Schools, 
and teachers in the Primary 
Schools, each, from 375 to 700 00 

Music Teacher, 1,050 00 

Aggregate amount paid, 66,600 34 

School House Repairs. 

Paid Stevens & Scofield, for carpenter 
work, 
Mark Leighton, for carpenter work, 
John Flanagan, *' 

Amounts carrkd fo)imrd^ $1,251 61 $565,164 07 



564 


35 


15 


00 


652 


26 



79 



Amounts brougJit forward, 


$1,231 61 $565,104 07 


Paid J. E. Beath, for carpenter work, 


102 67 


J. P. Ferry, '' 


3 09 


J. VV. Spear, *' 


12 64 


E. M. Paul, '' 


62 85 


T. Driscoll, '' 


117 54 


J. L. Taylor, '' 


88 55 


G. T. Buinham & Co., '' 


519 18 


R. A. Melvin, 


484 72 


Thomas Long, '' 


312 39 


D. W. Crocker, '<• 


23 10 


Samuel Perry, *' 


57 21 


Albert Caswell, '' 


28 00 


D. McLeod, " 


20 50 


D. W. Robbins, *' 


36 49 


Daniel Brooks, mason work, 


1,472 58 


Patrick Terry, " 


107 40 


Edward Caliill, *' 


76 00 


A. M. Siblev, '' 


21 50 


C. H. Roberts, " 


61 68 


R. 0. Dennett, for whitewashing, 


8 00 


Brine & Clark, fof cement. 


8 70 


Henry McElwin, for blackboards, 


98 72 


J. A. Swasey, *' 


254 84 


J. L. Hammett, '^ 


86 60 


Edward Earley, for slating and 




repairing roofs. 


457 75 


M. W. Pierce & Co , for repairing 




heating apparatus. 


374 42 


Charles Holmes & Son, for repair- 




ing heating apparatus, 


451 93 


J. A. Merrifield, for repairing 




heating apparatus, 


13 28 


W. L. Snow & Co., do.. 


139 91 


C. H. Tufts, for painting and 




glazing, 


87 08 


Amounts carried forward. 


$6,820 96 $565,164 07 



80 

Amounts brought forward, 
Paid O. P. Wiley, for painting and glazing, 
T. E. Wentworth & Co., '' 
D. W. McDermott, '' 

D. McDermott, '' 
Hiram Tribble, " 
J. H. Hollis, " 
J. Franklin, '* 
C. H. McKenna & Co., for gas 

fixtures, 
N. Dennett, for gas fixtures, 
J. W. Drake, " 

Cambridge Gas Light Co., piping, 
C. Sullivan, for plumbing, 
F. A. Titus, " 
Boston Belting Co., for hose. 
Water Service Assessment account, 

for service pipe, 
S. P. Taylor, for drain pipe, 
O. Nowell, for adjusting bells, 

E. H. Brabrook, for carpets, etc., 
S. J. Wood, for repairing locks, 
Ward & Waldron, for paper hang- 
ings, 

A. G. Whitcomb, for desks, etc., 
Hugh Carne}^, for trees, 
E. Mattoon, for heating valves, 
Charles Cooper, for ventilating 

pipe, 
P2. Robinson, for keys, 
Daniel Pratt's Sons, for clock, 
E. S. Bailey, for repairing clocks, 
David Cutter, *' 

C. P. Sharp, '* 

Jasper Stone, '* 

Amounts carried forward, $8,626 99 3565,164 07 



$6,820 96 $565,164 07 


39 


85 


7 


50 


45 


37 


92 


20 


2 


83 


262 


22 


24 


00 


103 


25 


48 


71 


1 


50 


12 


83 


25 


50 


215 


21 


34 


40 


34 


39 


48 


36 


31 


32 


69 


15 


• 10 


00 


18 


12 


504 


32 


94 


50 


12 


50 


28 


00 


2 


75 


9 


00 


15 


50 


3 


25 


6 


00 


3 


50 



,626 


99 


$565, 


,164 


07 


6 


00 








45 


50 








5 


00 








15 


90 








12 


30 








9 


15 








7 


00 








11 


60 









81 

Amounts hroxight forward^ 
Paid G. W. Bartlett, for repairing clocks, 
Barker & Tibbetts, for ventilators, 

fire brick, and expressing, 
Thomas Goodhue, for expressing, 
Perham & Rollins, ** 
Webb & Stevens, for lamp, 
Fletcher & Libby, for ladders, etc., 
" *' for hand hose 

carriage, 
James Gwynn, for expressing, 
Public Park Betterment Assessment 

account, assessment on Cross St. 52 87 

Highwa}" Betterment Assessment 

account, assessment on Warren 

Avenue, 
Sundr}^ Insurance Co.s' premiums 

on insurance on school-houses, 
J. E. Parsons, for dusters, brooms, 

etc., 
D. E. Whitten, dusters, brooms, etc., 
John E. Tuttle, '' " " 

C. E. Edlefsen & Co., dusters, 
brooms, etc., 

Packard & Burrill, dusters, brooms, 

etc., 
Murph}^ Leavens & Co., dusters, 

brooms, etc., 
S. T. Littlefield, dusters, brooms, 

etc., 

D. White & Son, dusters, brooms, 
etc., 

Charles Tufts, for rent of Chapel, 
for school-room. 

Amounts carried forward^ $10,220 93 $565,164 07 

6 



290 


16 


888 


70 


13 


88 


8 


71 


16 


45 


19 


17 


3 


50 


30 


26 


1 


Q^ 


6 


13 


150 00 



82 

Amounts hrougU forward, $10,220 93 $565,164 07 

Paid Daniel Swan, rent of rooms for 

school-rooms, 51 00 

West Boston Savings Bank, rent of 

rooms for school-rooms, 200 00 

Flynn Bros., for repairing furni- 
ture, etc., 

Francis Gibbons, labor, 

William Davis, " 

Joseph Young, " 

B. F. Sheridan, " 

Rand & By am, soap, 

D. H. Rinn, for^ cleaning, cutting 
grass, etc., 

J. M. Coburn, labor, 

S. L. Pratt, carriage hire, 

H. W. Raymond, hardware, 

T. A. Goodhue, moving furniture, 

Sundiy persons, for cleaning, la- 
bor, etc., 23 15 

Russell & Fitch, for removing night 

soil, 168 00 



27 


80 


25 


50 


3 


00 


3 


50 


26 


50 


16 


50 


17 


50 


11 


25 


16 


00 


3 


77 


10 


50 



School Fuel. 

Paid Brine & Clark, for fuel, 
L. G. Burnham & Co., fuel, 
Edward Flanagan, for weighing. 
Bourne Spooner, for advertising, 

Street Lights. 

Paid Cambridge Gas Light Co., for gas, 
repairs, etc., 
Chailestown Gas Co., for gas, 
for lamp posts and repairs, 



600 


90 


3,348 


96 


29 


52 


8 


37 


2,388 


44 


16 


70 


1,911 


64 


145 


58 



10,824 90 



3,987 75 



Amounts carried forward, $4,462 36 $579,976 72 



83 



Amounts brought fonvard, 
Paid Globe Gas Light Co., for lighting, 
Hugh Blackvvell, '' 

carting lanterns, labor, etc., 
H. M. Bird, for lamp posts, 
Davis & Farnura Manufacturing 

Co., for lamp posts, 
Tufls Bros., for lanterns, etc., 
Howe & Flint, repairing lamps, 
J. D. Gould, for burners, 
T. F. McGann, '' 
Wadsworth Bros., & Hovvland for 

alcohol, 
Williams & Ashlc}', for fluid, etc., 
Samuel Walker & Co., " " 
R. & W. Sherburne, for glass, 
Lambert Bros., for glass, 
Cutter & Parker, '' 
Hills, Turner & Co., for glass, 
Seward Dodge, repairing lamp 

frames, 
Wm. R. Rradford, for castings, 
H. R Bishop & Co., for ladder. 
Globe Gas Light Co , for signs. 

Sewers. 
Paid laborers, 

JMichael Collins, for constructing 
sewer in South and Earle St. 
balance, 
Maurice Terrj^, for constructing 
sewer in Pitman and Beach Sts. 
balance, 
Samuel Walcott, filling material 
on Winthrop Avenue, 

Amounts carried forward^ 



4,462 


36 $579,976 72 


392 


76 


2,714 


60 


81 


50 


140 


00 


20 


00 


153 


90 


55 


73 


13 


85 


3 


80 


22 


42 


11 


13 


9 


65 


6 


50 




60 


7 


00 


44 


89 


3 


50 


1 


10 


3 


00 


2 


50 




Q 1 p;n ro 



4,802 72 



632 80 



275 25 



330 50 



,041 27 $588,127 51 



84 

Amounts hrovglit forward, $6,041 27 $588,127 51 

Paid George W. Wj-att, for brick, 
Massachusetts Brick Co., " 
W. S. Blanchard, for lumber, 
E D. Sawyer & Co., *' 
Brine & Clark, for cement, 
John Leland, for cesspool covers, 
Day, Collins & Co., for drain pipe, 
Charles Holmes & Son, for drain 

pipe, lanterns, etc., 
Lewis & Willett, for drain pipe, 
H. Wellington & Co., for cement, 
Bray & Hayes, '* 

Margaret Pepper, for sand, 
Joseph Breck & Co., for shovels, 

etc., 

F. M. Burrows, for boring, 
L. Schoile, for pails, 
L. *G. Burnham & Co., for fuel, 
Philip Eberle, for rubber boots, 
Seward Dodge, for sharpening 

tools, etc., . 49 39 
Cook, R^'mes & Co., for sharpening 

tools, etc., 36 48 

M. Lynch, for sharpening tools, 5 00 

Geoige H. Sampson, for powder, 7 80 

Howe & Flint, for hardware, 6 30 

Charles Davis, for curbs, 550 50 

G. W. Ranlett, for cesspool stone, 7 90 
William R, Bradford, catch-basin 

covers, etc., 183 49 

Estate of Samuel Littlefield, for 

brick, 
D. P. Green, for sewer grates, 
James Bartley, for oil, etc., 

Amounts carrkd forward, $9,725 28 $588,127 51 



1,150 


60 


47 


70 


74 


26 


10 


93 


351 


83 


73 


50 


344 


59 


57 


29 


183 


00 


43 


50 


5 


50 


77 


05 


62 


09 


197 


60 


14 


00 


4 


00 


13 


50 



82 


73 


34 


82 


8 


66 



85 

Amounts bronght forward, $9,725 28 $588,127 51 
D. E. Levering, for mason work, 25 42 

C. H. Coffin, labor on drain, • 17 19 
T. W. Littlefield, for repairing 

pump, 4 75 
J. A. Cummings & Co., for print- 
ing, 6 00 
Horace Partridge, printing, 10 00 
J. E. Farwell & Co., " 23 00 
George B. King, ,'," 2 75 
Bourne Spooner, for advertising, 14 40 

D. L. Neiss, for oil hogshead, 8 20 
Hinckley Bros. & Co., for oakum, 5 51 
George A. Kimball, for sand- 
bucket, 9 00 

E. F. Bowker, plan, etc., of out- 
let of Milk Street sewer, 

A. W. Berr}^ labor, 

F. Mongan, teaming, 
O. C. Hanson, " 
H. W. Raymond, hardware, 
S. J. Wood, filing saws. 
Salary account, labor of engi- 
neer's assistants, 

Albert Kenneson, superintendent, 
D. A. Sanborn, '* 

For horse keeping. 

Sewers (Beacon and Elm Street 
Sewer). 

Paid William Sullivan, contractor, 
F. M. Burrows, boring, 
Fitchburg Railroad Co., labor at 

crossing of sewer with road. 
Bourne Spooner, advertising. 

Amounts carried forward, $29,928 74 $599,316 58 



30 


69 


7 


00 


16 


50 


20 


00 




74 




75 


374 


77 


53 


81 


733 


31 


100 


00 




111 fto n7 




ii,ioy \j i 


29,700 


00 


121 


50 


99 


54 


7 


70 



86 



Amounts brought forward, $29,928 74 $599,316 58 

Paid Journal Newspaper Co., advertising, 7 00 

Daily Advertiser, * u 8 00 



Sidewalks. 

Paid W. M. Hadley & Co., for cement, 
Patrick Rafferty, for edgestone, 
George A. Foster, for brick. 

Soldiers' Relief. 

Paid Brine & Clark, for fuel, 

L. G. Burnham & Co., for fuel, 
Philip Eberle, for boots and shoes, 
J. H. Brooks, for clothing, 
Sundr}^ persons, for aid, 
Sturtevant Bros., for gi oceries, etc. 
Carpenter Bros., " '' 

J. F. Cole & Co., '' " 

James Bartley, 
P. T. G^Brien, 



a 



a 



Somerville Water Works. 

Paid laborers, 

H. Wellington & Co., for cement, 

etc., 
J. A. Wellington & Co., for cem- 
ent, etc., 
Boston Machine Co., for gates, 

hj'drants, etc., 
John H. Reed & Co., for iron, 
Farrar, Follett & Co., '' 
Fuller, Dana & Fitz, '' 
Geo. L. Clark, for hj'drant. 

Amounts carried forward, 



8 


00 


21 


3S 


26 


00 


96 


76 


83 


25 


. 12 


00 


9 


00 


305 


50 


140 


00 


23 


00 


21 


00 


11 


00 


3 


00 


4,221 


22 


283 


65 



291 80 



29,943 74 



55 38 



704 51 



569 


08 


388 


72 


306 


98 


22 


05 


46 


00 



1,129 50 $630,020 21 



87 

Amounts brought forward, $6,129 50 $630,020 21 

Paid H. B. Bigelow, for repairing hy- 
drants, 106 80 
Morrill & Hooker, for stand posts, 

etc., 
Sewell, Day & Co., for oakum, 
Brine & Clark, for cement, 
Margaret Pepper, for sand. 
Carpenter, Woodward & Morton, 

for lead, 
Sabin & Page, for duck, etc., 
Paltee & Perkins, for h3^drants, etc., 
Seward Dodge, for blacksmithing, 
N. E. i^inen Hose Manuf. Co., for 

hose, 
J. C. Story & Co., for oil, etc., 
Cit}^ of Boston, for pipe, etc., 

water rates. 
Paid A. J. Wilkinson & Co., for 

nails, steel, etc., 7 45 

Benjamin Aim}', car fares, station- 
ery, etc., 25 00 
W. Reed & Sons, for powder and 

fuse, 4 65 

Fire Association of Philadelphia, 

premium of insurance on stock, 

fixtures, etc., 
J A. Anderson & Co., for cloth, 
J. H. Brooks, " 

Union Glass Co., for lanterns, 
Geo H. Sampson, for powder, 
Walworth Manfg Co., for pipe, 

valves, etc., 
Braman, Dow & Co., for pipe, 
H. W. Raymond, for hardware, 

etc., 

Amounts carried forward, $7,113 14 $630,020 21 



76 


00 


46 


49 


165 


40 


73 


50 


14 


25 


11 


95 


57 


00 


32 


74 


33 


75 


42 


74 


140 


25 


11 


00 



22 


50 


6 


97 


4 


84 


12 


24 


3 


55 


58 


64 


4 


05 


21 


88 



88 

Amounts hrouglit forward, $7,113 14 $630,020 21 

Paid E. L. White, medical attendance 

on laborer injured on the works, 
Michael Devine, for teaming, 
Franklin Hopkins, urinal. 
Cook, Rymes & Co., sharpening 

tools, etc., 
J. F. Paul & Sons, for lumber, 
J. Q. Twombly, for oil, etc., 
McCarty Bros., for clay, 
Patrick Kane, " 

Charles Holmes & Son, fire brick, 
Thomas Cunningham, for boiler, 

etc., 
Wm. R. Bradford, for gate covers, 
Boston & Albany R. R. Co., freight 

on h3^drant, 8 50 

Fitchburg R. R. Co., freight on 

hydrants, 

B. Almy, superintendent, 
J. Bartle}^, grain, etc., 

C. Maguire, horseshoeing, 
Parker & Gannett, for shovels, 
Thomas Groom & Co., stationery, 
B. F. Tyler, for hay and straw, 
Chaffee & Cummings, charcoal, 
W. J. London, expressing. 
Sundry persons, cement, oil, la- 
bor, expressing, etc., 



J. F. Ham, for hay. 



State Aid. 



10 


00 


10 


50 


3 


25 


30 


82 


26 


73 


7 


98 


12 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


29 


57 


40 


17 



1 


96 


200 


00 


139 


53 


23 


17 


24 


75 


6 


70 


57 


01 


5 


50 


9 


25 


11 


43 


37 


08 



7,813 04 



Paid monthly pay-rolls, — amount 

charged to the State, 4,254 12 



Araount carried forward, $642,087 37 



89 

Amount b'^ought forward^ $642,087 37 

Support of Poor. 

Paid Brine & Clark, for fuel, 

L. G. Burnham & Co., for fuel, 

Sturtevant Bros., groceries and 
provisions, 

P. T. O'Brien, groceries and pro- 
visions, 

John F. Cole & Co., groceries and 
provisions, 

J. Harris & Co., groceries and 
provisions. 

Carpenter Bros., groceries and 
provisions, 

H. W. Crowell, groceries and 
provisions, 

H. W. Burgess, groceries and 
provisions, 

U. R. Penne}' & Co., groceries 
and provisions, 

Webster & Stevens, groceries 
and provisions, 

James Bartle}', groceries and pro- 
visions, 

C. A. Small, groceries and pro- 
visions, 

George McLaughlin, groceries and 
provisions, 

Simon White, groceries and pro- 
visions, 

Trainor Bros., groceries and pro- 
visions, 

M. D. Dewire, groceries and pro- 
visions, 

Amounts carried forward, $16,464 47 $642,087 37 



$3,505 


66 


974 


82 


3,950 


36 


2,564 


65 


580 


00 


1,299 


07 


943 


08 


517 


85 


58 


00 


205 


00 


636 


00 


185 


93 


281 

1 


00 


73 


00 


100 


00 


562 05 


19 


00 



90 



Amou7its brought fonvard, 
Paid A. Cross & Son, groceries and pro- 
visions, 

B. Halloran, groceries and provis- 
ions, 

C. E. Edlefson & Co., groceries 
and provisions, 

Dorr, Loring & Co., groceries and 
provisions, 

J H. Hanley, groceries and pro- 
visions, 

S. T. Littlefield & Co., for grocer- 
ies and provisions, 

Henry McAvoy, for groceries and 
provisions, 

E. Drew, for groceries and provisions, 
I. H. Packard, " " 
Sundry persons, " " 

F. N. Lewis, for crackers, 
J. C. Davidson, for milk, 
H. K Woodward, "■ 
John Monahan, " 

Philip Eberlee, boots and shoes, 
Dyer Bros., " '' 

Smith & Cole, " " 

J. M. Adams, " " 

J. H. Brooks, clothing, etc., 
J. W. Brine, '' ** 

J. P. Farnsworth,'' " 

Excelsior Dry Goods Store, 
clothing, etc., 

D. A. Sanborn, stove, 

J. J. Giles, for washing and food 

furnished, 
George B. King, stationery, 

Amounts carried forward, 



$16,464 47 $642,087 37 



161 00 



42 00 



60 00 



68 00 



36 00 



10 00 



46 


00 


33 


00 


16 


00 


54 


50 


36 


11 


10 


56 


4 


96 


3 


36 


888 


23 


61 


75 


4 


60 


128 


55 


109 


32 


46 


75 


2 


25 


17 


57 


4 


00 


40 


82 


30 


47 



$18,380 27 $642,087 37 



91 



Amounts brought forward, 


$18,380 


27 $642,087 


37 


Paid M. R. Warren, stationery, 


8 


03 




G. F. Ricker, " 




2 


70 




J. E. Farwell &Co., for stationery 








and printing. 




A^ 


75 




J. C. Davidson, clerical 


services, 


56 


00 




Brown & Alger, rent of 


rooms, 


15 


00 




Patrick Terry, " 


(fc 


4 


00 




Catherine Sullivan, '' 


c; 


12 


00 




Bridget Conlon, " 


tc 


18 


00 




Michael Carey, '* 


(( 


12 


00 




Patrick Sheridan, " 


Cfc 


28 


00 




J. Delay, ^' 


(k 


24 


00 




B. McCarroll, 


!.<. 


78 


00 




Bernard Hagan, " 


(fc 


108 


00 




J. C. Row, '' 


li 


96 


00 




Mary McLaughlin, '' 


il 


51 


00 




Patrick Shea, '' 


IC 


56 


00 




P. A. Cunningham,'' 


Ifc 


28 


00 




J. Newhall, " 


(( 


60 


50 


■ -- f. 


Benjami n Tilton , ' ' 


cc 


12 


00 




Thomas Tighe, '' 


u 


9 


00 




Patrick Raiferty, undertaker's ser- 








vices. 




442 


50 




H. B. Runey, undertaker's services, 


88 


50 




W. L. Lockhart, '' 


(( 


17 


75 




Woodlawn Cemetery Corporation, 








for grave. 




17 


00 




J. Tinkham, for coffin, 




10 


00 




Ansel Lewis, transportation of 








paupers, 




48 


11 




City of Boston, support 


of paupers. 


1,600 


26 




Town of Ipswich, '' 


li 


440 


00 




City of Cambridge, " 


(( 


353 


48 




Town of HoUiston, " 


i( 


183 


00 





Amounts carried forward^ 



$22,305 85 $642,087 37 



92 

Amounts brought forward, $22,305 85 $642,087 37 

Paid town of Canton, support of 

paupers, 106 15 

City of Lawrence, support of 

paupers, 74 00 

City of Chelsea, support of 

paupers, 29 10 

City of Taunton, support of 

paupers, 123 91 

Worcester Lunatic Hospital, sup- 
port of paupers, 574 38 

City of Haverhill, support of 
paupers, 

State of Mass., support of paupers, 

Charles McMann, board of pau- 
per, 

M. A. Terry, board of pauper, 

J. H. Hollis, 

C.S.Kimball, " *' 

F. J. Tutien, " " 
Massachusetts General Hospital, 

board of Bernard O'Brien, 65 00 
Vermont Asylum, board of Bridget 

Bradburn, 187 00 

G. H. Cowdin, for medicine, 2 00 
O. C. Hanson, removing pauper, 2 00 
Philip P^berle, moving family to 

Maryland, 40 00 

Woodward, Gage & Co., for bed- 
ding, 5 00 

Flynn Bros., for bedstead and 
moving furniture, 

Howe & Flint, for rake, 

Horace Chapin, for medical ser- 
vices, 

Amounts carried forward, $23,717 64 $642,087 73 



19 


00 


105 


17 


28 


28 


1 


00 


12 


00 


7 


00 


9 


00 



19 


00 




80 


2 


00 



93 

Amounts by ought foi ward, $23,717 64 $642,087 37 

Paid H. P. Hemenway, for medical ser- 
vices, 

W. W. Dow, for medical services, 

Thomas Cunningham, an overseer 
of the poor, 

Ansel Lewis, an overseer of the 
poor, 

Horace Chapin, an overseer of 
the poor, 

Horace Chapin, secretary of the 
Hoard, 

State of Massachusetts. 
Paid State Treasurer, State tax. 



9 00 




4 00 




300 00 




300 00 




300 00 




200 00 






24,830 64 






27,792 00 



Sundry Persons. 








Paid the following named 


amounts 


to 




their credit, Dec. 31 


1875:- 


- 




C. L. O'Neil, 






1,125 00 


Calvin Horton, 






102 50 


B. W. Patten, 






100 00 


Harrison, Beard & Co. 


> 




200 00 


Interest coupons. 






1,395 00 



2,922 50 
Sinking Fund ContributionSr 

Paid Commissioners of the Sinking 

Fund, 45,130 62 

Taxes. 

Paid heirs Wm. A. Russell, abatement 
awarded by the county com- 
missioners on tax of 1875, 129 60 

Amount carried forward, $742,892 73 



94 

Amount brought forward^ $742,892 73 

Temporary Loans. 

Paid as follows : — 

April 1. — Brewster, Basset & 

Co , notes dated March 21, 1876, $105,000 00 
April 1. — Boston Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank, note dated Dec. 29, 
1875, 50,000 00 

May 27. — ; Warren Institution for 
Savings, note dated Nov. 27, 
1875, 50,000 00 

June 1 . — Boston Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank, note dated Dec, 1, 
1875, 100,000 00 

June 1. — Aaron Sargent, trustee, 

note dated Dec. 31, 1875, 20,000 00 

June 14. — Bunker Hill National 

Bank, note dated Dec. 14, 1875, 50,000 00 
June 21. — People's National 

Bank, note dated Dec. 18, 1875, 20,000 00 
July 1. — Charles Wilson, note 

dated Dec. 31, 1875, 5,000 00 

Jul}" 1. — Commissioners of the 
Sinking Fund, Cit}" of Cam- 
bridge, note dated Feb. 1 9, 1876, 13,500 00 
Jul}" 1. — Brewster, Basset & Co., 

note dated May 5, 1876, 10,000 00 

Aug. 11 and Sept. 23. — Brewster, 
Basset & Co., notes dated Jul}- 
1, 1876, 35,000 00 

Dec. 1. — Boston Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank, note dated April 1, 
1876, 50,000 00 

Dec. 1. — Boston Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank, note dated June 1, 
1876, 100,000 00 

Amounts carried forward, $608,500 00 $742,892 73 



95 

Amounts brought forward, $608,500 00 $742,892 73 

Paid Dec. 1 . — Boston Five Cents Sav 
ings Bank, note dated July 1 , 
1876, 100,000 00 

Dec 1 . — Maria M. Runej, note 

dated July 1, 1876, 2,000 00 

Dec. 6. — Maverick Nat. Bank, 

note dated April 3, 1876, 25,000 00 

Dec. 14 and 27. — Brewster, Bas- 
set & Co., notes dated Oct. 20, 
1876, 165,000 00 

Dec. 16. — Bunker Hill National 

Bank, note dated June 14, 1876, 50,000 00 

Dec. 30. — Warren Institute for 
Savings, note dated May 27, 
1876, 50,000 00 

Dec. 30. — Aaron Sargent, trus- 
tee, note dated June 1, 1876, 20,000 00 

Dec. 30. — Charles Wilson, note 

dated July 1, 1876, 5,000 00 

Dec. 30. — Mrs. S. E. Fisk, note 

dated Dec. 9, 1876, 4,000 00 

1,029,500 00 



Water Maintenance. 

Paid interest coupons of Water Loan 
Bonds, Nos. 1 to 3, 6 to 28, 
and 30 and 31 : — 

$60,000, 6 months at 7 per cent, 2,100 00 

235,000, 1 year at 6^ per cent, 15,275 00 

20,000, 1 year, at 6 per cent, 1,200 00 

65,500, 6 naos., at 5 J per cent, 1,801 25 



20,376 25 
Laborers, repairing pipe, 1,586 52 

J. F. Paul & Sons, for lumber, 99 45 



Amounts carried forward, $22,062 22 $1,772,392 73 



96 , 

Amounts brought forward, $22,062 22 $1,772,392 73 

Paid E. Clement & Co. for shingles, 5 49 

Sewell, Day & Co., for rope, 11 02 

Boston Machine Co., h3'clrant 

valves, 7 50 

Carpenter, Woodward & Morton, 

lead, 9 50 

Cook, Rymes & Co., sharpening 
tools, 

Union Glass Co., for lanterns, 

Chaffee & Cummings, for charcoal, 

C. H. North &Co., " salt, 

C. ^laguire, horseshoeing, 

J. N. White, harness work, 

Enoch P^merson, repairing wagon, 

R. A. Vinal, clerk of the Water 
Board, 

E. A, Foster, for hay, 

S. L. Pratt, carriage hire, 

Andrew Monahan, compensation 
for injuries received from ob- 
structing gate box, 

Patrick Farrell, teaming, 

J. Manning, '* 

Michael Norton, " 

Benjamin Almy, ten months' sal- 
ary as superintendent, 1,000 00 

Somerville Water Works account, 
two months' salary of superin- 
tendent, 200 00 



6 


40 


5 


25 


7 


50 


4 


55 


15 


30 


25 


00 


29 


00 


200 


00 


9 


60 


1 


50 


500 


00 


9 


00 


3 


00 


14 


00 



Water Services. 

Paid laborers, 799 42 

Thomas Cunningham, for pipe, etc. 433 32 



24,125 83 



Amounts cair led forward, $1,232 74 $1,796,518 56 



97 

Amoimts brought forward, $1,232 74 $1,796,518 56 

Paid Union Water Meter Co., for 

couplings, stopcocks, etc., 732 25 
Hamblen & Matthews, for couplings, 

stopcocks, etc. 65 20 
George Woodward & Co., coup- 
ling, etc., 7 79 
C. Sullivan & Co., plumbing, 105 84 
Boston Lead Co., for lead pipe, 56 01 
J. A. Merrifield, for soldering, 26 50 

A. J. Wilkinson, for padlocks, 20 18 
William R. Bradford, gate covers, 9 77 
J. A. Wellington & Co., cement, 24 00 
Aiken & Woodward, charcoal, 28 00 
Cook, Rymes & Co., sharpening 

tools, 6 70 
Walworth Manufacturing Co., 

pipe, etc., 40 40 

Seward Dodge, blacksmithing, 11 30 

C. Maguire, horseshoeing, 13 40 

James Bartley, grain, etc., 27 50 

Philip Eberle, rubber boots, 7 00 

J. A. Cummings & Co., printing, 5 00 

Parker & Gannett, shovels, 6 75 

B. F. Tyler, for hay, 7 08 
H. W. Raymond & Co., hardware, 52 
Worcester & Nashua R. R. Co., 

freight on castings, 90 
Boston & Albany R. R. Co., 

freight on castings, 34 

2,435 17 



Total disbursements, $1,798,953 73 



REPORT 



OF 



COMMISSIONERS OF THE SINKING FUND 



FOR 



18^76. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Mayok and Aldermen, Jan. 29 1877 
Accepted, and ordered to be printed with the City Reports for 1876 
feent down for concurrence. 

CHAELES E. GILMAN, Clerk. 



In Common Council, Jan. 29, 1877 
Concurred in. 

SOLOMON DAVIS, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Commissioners of the Sinking Funds, 
Jan. 27, 1877. 

To the Honorable, the Mayor, and the City Council of the City of Somerville. 

Gentlemen, — The Commissioners of the Sinking Funds, required 
by an ordinance of the city to report to the City Council, annually, 
the amount and condition of the sinking funds and the income 
thereof, report that the amount received from the city treasury, as 
contribution for the year 1876, was $45,130.62 ; that investment of 
the same has been made in Bonds of the City of Somerville, for the 
redemption of which sinking funds have been established, or which 
are secured by sinking funds, $44,600.00, and by deposit in savings 
bank, $630.62, and that no income has yet accrued to the credit of 
said funds. 

Respectfully submitted. 

NATHAN TUFTS, 

JOHN A. HUGHES, J> Commissioners. 

HENRY F. WOODS, 



I 



I 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



CITY Of SOMERVILLE, 



FOR THE 



Year 1876. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In School Committee, Dec. 29, 1876 
The Superintendent submitted his Annual Report, which was read and 
unanimously accepted. 

It was voted, that the committee adopt the report now submitted by the 
Superintendent of the Public Schools, and present it to their fellow-citizens 
as the Report of the School Committee for the year 1876. 

J. H. DAVIS, Secretary. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, Feb 12, 1877. 

The Report of the School Committee for the year 1876 was received and 
accepted, and the Committee on Printing were instructed to cause the 
same to be printed in the annual report. 

Also that two hundred copies of the report be printed independent of 

the annual City Report. 

Sent down for concurrence. 

CHARLES E. OILMAN, Clerk. 



In Common Council, Feb. 14, 1877. 
Concurred. 

SOLOMON DAVIS, Clerk. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE FOR 1876. 



Hon. Austin Belknap, Mayor, ex officio. 
Stillman H. Libby, President of Common Council, ex officio. 

WARD ONE. 

Henry M Moore Term expires Dec. 31, 18 7(5. 

Sanford Hanscom, M. D. . . . " " 1877. 

John H. Butler " " 1878. 

WARD TWO. 

Daniel E. Chase Term expires Dec. 31, 1876. 

Charles S. Lincoln " " 1877. 

Michael F. Farrell " " 1878. 

WARD THREE. 

Joseph P. Williams Term expires Dec. 31, 1876. 

Henry F. Spencer " " 1877. 

Albion A. Perry " " 1878. 

WARD FOUR. 

Prof. Benj. G. Brown .... Term expires Dec. 31, 1876. 

Horace Chapin, M. D " " 1877. 

Col. Charles F King '' "1878. 

Chairman, Secretary and Superintendent, 

Hon. Austin Belknap. Joshua H. Davis. 

SUBCOMMITTEES. 

On High Scliool Messrs. Brown, Spencer, Chapin, 

Lincoln, Butler. 

On Scliools in E. Somerville Dist., '* Hanscom, Moore, Butler. 

On Scliools in Prospect Hill Dist., " Chase, Farrell, Lincoln. 

On Schools in Winter Hill Dist , " Spencer, Williams, Perry. 

On Schools in Spring Hill Dist., " Chapin, King, Libby. 

On Schools in AV. Somerville Dist., " Brown, King, Chapin. 

On evening Schools' " Moore, Williams, Chapin, 

Farrell. 

On Examination of Teachers . . *' Lincoln, Butler, Brown. 

On Text-Books " Brown, Hanscom, King. 

On Repairs and School Furniture . " Moore, Chase, Libby, Peuky. 

On School Supplies ** Spencer, Perry. 

On Fuel *' Farrell, Williams. 

On Music ** King, Hanscom, Lincoln. 

On Finance ** Spencer, Chase. 

On Heating Apparatus .... ** Chapin, Williams. 

On Drawing " Hanscom, Perry, Libby. 




SCHOOL COMMITTEE FOR 1877. 



Hon. Austin Belknap, Mayor, ex officio. 
Stellman H. Libby, President of Common Council, ex officio. 

WARD ONE. 

Sanford Hanscom, M. D. ... Term expires Dec. 31, 1877. 

John H. Butler " " 1878. 

Henry M. Moore " " 1879. 

WARD TWO. 

Chas. S. Lincoln Term expires Dec. 31, 1877. 

Michael F. Farrell " " 1878. 

Daniel E. Chase " " 1879. 

WARD THREE. 

Henry F. Spencer Term expires Dec. 31, 1877. 

Henry F. Wood " " 1878. 

Joseph P. Williams " " 1879. 

WARD FOUR. 

Horace Chapin, M. D Term expires Dec. 31, 1877. 

Col. Charles F. King " " 1878. 

Walter W. Colburn " ** 1879. 

Chairman, Secretary and Superintendent, 

Hon Austin Belknap. Joshua H. Davis. 

SUBCOMMITTEES. 

On the Higli School Messrs. Spencer, Chapin, Lincoln, 

Butler, King. 

On Schools in E. Somerville Dist., " Hanscom, Moore, Butler. 

On Scliools in Prospect Hill Dist., " Chase, Farrell, Lincoln. 

On Schools in Winter Hill Dist., " Williams, Spencer, Woods. 

On Schools in Spring Hill Dist., " King, Chapin, Libby. 

On Schools in W. Somerville Dist., " Chapin, King, Colburn. 

On Evening Schools " Farrell, Williams, Chapin, 

Butler. 

On Examination of Teachers . . " Lincoln, Butler, Colburn. 

On Text-Books " Hanscom, Chapin, King. 

On Repairs and School Furniture . " Moore,Libby, Chase, Wood. 

On School Supplies " Spencer, Wood. 

On Fuel " Farrell, Williams. 

On Music " King, Hanscom, Lincoln. 

On Finance " Spencer, Chase. 

On Heating Apparatus " Williams, Moore. 

On Drawing " Hanscom, Libby, Colburn. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



The High School has been a subject of much solicitude to the 
committee which has been selected to watch over its interests, not 
from any misgivings as to the quality of instruction given there, nor 
from a suspicion that a comparison with the High Schools of other 
cities of the Commonwealth would be unfavorable to our own, but 
because the demands made by many leaders in educational matters 
for more extended and varied courses of study in our higher public 
schools arouse expectations in the communit}^ which may not 
immediately be answered. 

The purpose of the instruction given in the High School is two- 
fold : first, to give a large measure of intellectual culture and 
useful learning to those pupils whose school-days must end in this 
school ; secondly, to give good preparation for college to those who 
desire it. That the first purpose is fully attained b}^ the present 
prescribed course of study, we would by no means claim. For we 
are well aware that educators differ widely in their estimates of the 
relative importance of the different studies in the courses of instruc- 
tion in High Schools. No one can complain that the course in our 
High School lacks variety. Literature, science, language, math- 
ematics, history, philosophy, are all represented, and in no meagre 
quantities. We believe that no graduate of the school will ever 
regret having studied any of the required branches, but will onl^^ 
lament that he did not learn more of each. 

The success of the College Preparatory Course is conspicuous. 
The committee has cheerfully indorsed all steps taken by the Prin- 
cipal in his endeavor to have the pupils who graduate in this course 
fully prepared for examination in all the studies required for admis- 
sion to the college which makes the highest and most varied 



lOS 

demands. And the , graduates of this school, at examination for 
admission to college, acquit themselves as well now as at any time 
in the past. 

We are not indifferent to the sentiment which has been earnestly 
proclaimed b}^ some influential citizens of the State, that prepara- 
tion for college and higher education are not legitimate subjects of 
pubHc expense ; but we decidedly dissent from it. We would rather 
protest against the withdrawal of these pupils from the High School. 
All the other members of the school, more especiall}^ those who are 
joined with them in some of the studies, are benefited in no small 
degree by having, as fellow students, those who are studying for a 
high and definite purpose. Besides, we have not lost faith in the 
wisdom of the fathers, who enacted that "when any town shall 
increase to the number of one hundred families, they shall set up a 
grammar school, the masters thereof being able to instruct youth so 
far as they may be fitted for the universit3^" 

The school has increased in numbers proportionatel}^ with the 
growth of the city, so that to-day it has two hundred and twenty- 
one pupils. At the beginning of the school yeav there were two 
hundred and twent3^-two. This is a larger number than can be 
seated in the rooms of the Principal and the sub-master ; and a few 
have been seated in the recitation-rooms of the assistants. 

The class which joined the school last September numbered 
eighty-six. Formerly, when classes had no more than sixty mem- 
bers, they were divided for recitation into two sections. Now they 
are divided into three, thus increasing the number of hours per 
week for recitation. Besides, the recent requirement of French for 
admission to Harvard College has added two hours per week to the 
number of recitations. As a result, every teacher is occupied in 
teaching ever}^ hour of the week. We believe that the Principal 
should have some hours each school-da}^ to supervise the work done 
in all the class-rooms. This he cannot do unless he shall be re- 
lieved of some of his present work of instruction bj- the appoint- 
ment of an additional assistant. 

In our examinations of the classes, and occasional visits, we have 
alwa^^s been impressed by the thorough knowledge of his subject as 
evinced in the intelligent instruction given by the Principal in what- 



109 

ever department he was teaching. But in some cases, when the 
sections of a class were under different teachers, while one section 
would be finely taught in a given branch, another would show 
marked deficiency. This was what we anticipated. We believe 
that no teacher can be equalty qualified to teach all the branches in 
the High School Course, and that '* Departmental Instruction" 
should be insisted on, so that each teacher should teach those 
studies, and those only, in which the Principal and Superintendent 
have satisfied themselves that he or she excels. And we trust that 
this method, which is alread^^ acquiesced in by all the teachers as 
to some of the studies, will at no distant day become the law of the 
school. 

We cannot too highly commend the school, both for the large 
amount of good instruction, and the general decorum which shows 
a consciousness, especially on the part of the pupils in the upper 
classes, that it is their dut}^ to comport themselves as 3'oung gen- 
tlemen and ladies ; and we feel sure that the parents of the pupils, 
if the}^ favored the school with frequent visits, would indorse this 
commendation. 

BEN'JAMIK G. BROWX, 

Chairman of the High School Committee, 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the School Committee of Somerville. 

Gentlemen, — In compliance with a requirement of your regula- 
tions, the following report is respectfully submitted. 

The year just closing has been one of general prosperity, as re- 
gards the educational interests of our cit3\ In their leading fea- 
tures, the schools remain essentially the same, as time advances ; 
but each succeeding year furnishes cheering evidence of substantial 
progress and decided improvement in methods and results. 

It gives me pleasure to bear testimon}^ to the industry and com- 
mendable deportment of pupils, and the general fidelity of teachers 
in the performance of their duties. With few exceptions, pleasant 
relations have existed between parents and teachers, and the conse- 
quent co-operation so essential to the highest efficienc}^ has been 
secured. 

With accustomed liberality, the City Council have made all re- 
quired appropriations to meet the current expenses of the schools. 
The Committee on Public Property have responded promptly to the 
numerous and ever-recurring demands upon them. The school 
buildings, school furniture, and heating apparatus have received 
careful attention, and important and permanent improvements have 
been made in the Forster School-house and about the High School 
building. 

By vote of the Board, at their meeting in Februar}' last, perspec- 
tive views of the exterior of the High School building and the 
Luther V. Bell School-house, and of the hall and Principal's room 
in the High School building, were furnished for the Centennial Ex- 
position at Philadelphia. These views have been returned, and 
will be retained in the buildings represented. 

At the beginning of the school 3^ear in September, Greenleaf 's 
series of arithmetics was substituted for Walton's, in the primary 
schools, and in the fifth and sixth clases of the grammar schools. 

The course of study in Vocal Music has been revised during the 



Ill 

year, and a new impulse has been given to this interesting branch 
of instruction. 

Albion A. Perry, Esq , a member of the School Board for Ward 
Three, tendered his resignation in consequence of the urgenc}" of 
other duties. His resignation was accepted by the Board at their 
meeting in November. 



In May last, a primaiy school was organized in Prospect Hill 
district ; and in September, a grammar school was organized in 
West Somerville district. For the accommodation of the new pri- 
mary school in Prospect Hill district, a room was vacated in Pros- 
pect Hill School-house b}^ the removal of one of the grammar schools 
from that building to the hall on the corner of Washington and 
Prospect Streets, formcrlj' known as Armory Hall. In West Som- 
erville district, the new grammar school was accommodated by the 
transfer of the primary school from Lincoln School-house to a room 
in Clarendon Block. 

Whole number of schools at the present time . 79 

High 1 

Grammar ....... 45 

Primaiy . . . . . . . 33 

Seven teachers have resigned during the 3^ear, and nine have 
been elected to fill vacancies and for the new schools. 

In March last, Samuel C. Hunt, Esq., resigned his position as 
Principal of the Luther V. Bell School, and was succeeded by 
Simeon C. Higgins, Esq. Mr. Hunt was first elected Principal of 
Prospect Hill School in May, 1866, which position he occupied until 
the completion of the Luther V. Bell School-house in 1874, when 
he was transferred to that building. 

At the end of the school year in July, Horace P. Makechnie, Esq., 
resigned the position he had occupied as Principal of the Lincoln 
School, since January 1867, and was succeeded by Edward E. 
Bradbuiy, Esq. 

We have to record the death of a highly esteemed teacher, — 
Miss Emeline A. Dane. Miss Dane graduated at our High School 
in 1872, and was elected teacher of the Harvard School in 1873, 



112 



which position she occupied until the time of her death, which 
occurred January 24th. 



Whole number of teachers at the present time 

Male teachers, 8 ; female teachers, 80. 
Number of teachers in the High School 

Male teachers, 2 ; female teachers, 4. 
Number of teachers in the grammar schools, 

Male teachers, 5 ; female teachers, 43. 
Number of teachers in the primary schools 

One teacher of Vocal Music. 



88 

6 

48 

33 



SCHOOLS AND TEACHEKS. 



Schools. 



High 



Forster 



Prescott 



Edgerly 



Tufts Street. 



Teachers. 



George L. Baxter 

William S. Forrest... 

Sarah W. Fox 

Sarah L. Graves 

Annette E. Long 

Julia A. Stetson 

George R. Bradford... 
Lillian A Washburn . . 

Anna M. Snow 

Frances M. Gup till. . . . 

Edith C. Long 

Helen E. Magoun 

Martha H. Pennock . . . 

Ella F. Lears 

Mary E. Wiggiu 

Gordon A. Southworth 

Anna M. Bates 

V. E. Hapgood 

Harriet N. Sands 

Kate A. Duncan 

Frances L. Child 

M. Ellen Eddy 

Nancy W, Proctor .... 
Catharine T. Brown. .. 

Clara Taylor 

Georgette P. Hall 

Fannie E. Morse 

Mary A. Eice 

Augusta M Cowles . . . 

Amelia I. Sears 

Anna L. Prescott .... 

Clara M. Bagley 

H. V. Hathaway 

Ada Cowles 



Salary. 


First 
Elected. 


$2,400 


1867 


1,800 


1875 


1,200 


1868 


1,000 


1865 


1,000 


1864 


1,000 


1873 


1,800 


1864 


650 


1874 


650 


1866 


650 


1869 


650 


1868 


650 


1868 


650 


1873 


650 


1874 


475 


1875 


2,000 


1873 


700 


1874 


650 


1876 


650 


1864 


650 


1874 


650 


1867 


650 


1869 


650 


1869 


650 


1868 


650 


1871 


650 


1874 


650 


1873 


650 


1873 


700 


1865 


650 


1873 


650 


1873 


650 


1873 


650 


1875 


575 


1875 



113 



SCHOOLS AND TEACHERS. — Continued. 



Schools. 



Luther V. Bell 



Teachers. 



Prospect Hill 



Brastow 
Bennett 

Jackson 

Webster 

Union . . 
Morse . . 



Beech Street 

Spring Hill . 
Franklin . . . . 

Harvard 

Lincoln 



Holland Street.. . 
Cedar Street 



Teacher of Music 



Simeon C. Higgins 

Minnie H. Marden . . . . 

Clara A. Battles 

Lydia L. Gordon 

Ellen M. Gooding 

Caroline S. Plimpton.. 

Abbie C. Hunt 

Fannie A. Wilder 

Lydia J. Page 

Lizzie Appleton 

Belle H. Grieves 

Augusta A. Roberts . . 

Maria Miller 

Hattie M. Sears 

Ellen Ledyard 

Ida A. Howe 

Lillian F. Howe 

Charlotte I. Houghton 
Sarah E. Pennock .... 
Annie W. Chickering.. 

Helen Tincker . . 

Adeline Sanderson 

Mary B Currier 

Emma F. Schuh 

Lizzie W. Shelton 

Rebecca F. Woodberry 
Mary L. Sanderson . . - 

Louise A. Brine 

Ada L. Sanborn 

Annie L. Savage 

Nora OLeary 

Isabella M. Prince 

William B. Allen 

Nellie P. Nichols 

Pauline S. Downes 

Helen W. Chapin 

Anna E. Sawyer 

Mary A. Haley 

Marion Damon - . . =. 

Louisa M. Wilde 

Jane E. Clark 

Lizzie C. Howe 

Emeline C. Ruggles . . 

Hattie A. Hills 

Annie E. Robinson. . . . 
Edward E. Bradbury . . 

Jennie Colburn 

Georgiana Cutter 

Margaret D. Barter . . 

Carrie L. Lacount 

P. Jenette Teele 

Alice Simpson 

Lizzie J. Conwell 

S. H O. Hadley 



Salary. 



First 
Elected. 



$1,800 
650 
650 
650 
650 
650 
650 
650 
650 
575 
650 
700 
650 
650 
650 
575 
650 
475 
650 
650 
700 
650 
575 
575 
700 
650 
475 
375 
700 
650 
575 
375 

1,800 
650 
650 
650 
650 
650 
650 
650 
700 
650 
650 
575 
475 

1,800 
650 
650 
475 
650 
650 
650 
650 

1,050 



1876 
1876 
1874 
1869 
1868 
1859 
1873 
1874 
1869 
1874 
1874 
1861 
1870 
1875 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1875 
1871 
1874 
1872 
1871 
1873 
1874 
1860 
1863 
1875 
1876 
1869 
1873 
1874 
1876 
1869 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1873 
1868 
1875 
1873 
1873 
1868 
1876 
1874 
1876 
1876 
1875 
1873 
1875 
1875 
1870 
1872 
1873 
1868 



114 



PUPILS. 

The whole number of persons in the cit}' between five and fifteen 
years of age, on the first day of May last, as ascertained by the 

4,028 



Ward One 


. 1,340 


Ward Two 


. 1,400 


Ward Three 


633 


Ward Four 


655 


n crease for the year 





343 



Whole number of pupils in all the schools in Ma}' 
last ...... 

Number over fifteen 3'ears of age . 
Whole number of pupils in all the schools in De 
cember ..... 

Boys ..... 

Girls 

Number over fifteen ^^ears of age . 

Number of pupils in the High School 

Boys ..... 
Girls 

Number of pupils in the grammar schools 
B03 s . . . . . 
Girls 

Number of pupils in the primary schools 

Boys 

Gills 



1,994 
1,980 



93 
128 



957 

988 



944 

864 



4,021 
305 

3,974 

306 
221 



1,945 



1,808 



The High School contained 5 562 per cent of all the pupils. 
The grammar schools contained 48.943 per cent of all the pupils. 
The primary schools contained 45.495 per cent of all the pupils. 



115 



Number of pupils in all the schools in December, 1872, 

" " 1873, 

" " 1874, 

" " 1875, 

cc u u a 1376^ 

Whole number of pupils registered in all the schools 
during the 3'ear 1876 ...... 



a 
u 



3,381 
3,626 
3,708 
3,974 

4,960 



TABLE SHOWING THE NUMBER OF PUPILS IN EACH OF THE THIRTEEN 
CLASSES IN DECEMBER ; THE AVERAGE AGE OF PUPILS IN EACH CLASS, 
THE PER CENT THAT THE NUMBER IN EACH CLASS IS OF THE WHOLE 
NUMBER, AND THE NUMBER OF CLASSES IN EACH GRADE. 



School. 



High 



Grammar , 



Primary. 



Total. 



Class. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 


First . , 


15 


23 


38 


Second 


15 


25 


40 


Third.. 


26 


32 


58 


Fourth 


37 


48 


85 


First .. 


55 


71 


126 


Second 


71 


101 


172 


Third. . 


129 


137 


266 


Fourth 


210 


201 


411 


Fifth . . 


229 


208 


437 


Sixth. 


2G3 


270 


533 


First . . 


244 


226 


470 


Second 


2G4 


252 


516 


Third. . 


436 


386 


822 




1994 


1980 


3974 



Average Age. 



18yrs. Omos. 

17 

16 

15 



14 
14 
13 
12 
11 
10 



2 
4 
9 

10 

4 
4 
3 
3 

5 

7 
3 



Per Cent. 



.956 
1.007 
1.459 
2.139 

3.171 

4.328 

6.693 

10.342 

10.997 

13.412 

11.827 
12.985 
20.684 



100.000 



No. of 

Classes in 

each Grade. 



1 
1 
1 
1 

4 
4 

7 
10 
10 
12 



17 



84 



116 



PKIMARY SCHOOLS. 



Schools. 



Forster . 
Prescott. 



Edgerly 

Tufts Street . . . 

a 

Luther V. Bell 
Prospect Hill 



Brastow 
Bennett 



Jackson 



Webster. 



Union 

Beech Street 
Spring Hill . 
Franklin 



Harvard 

Lincoln 

Holland Street, 
Cedar Street . . . 



Teachers. 



Martha H. Pennock 

Ella F. Lears 

Mary E. Wiggin 

Georgette P. Hall . . 

Fannie E. Morse 

Mary A. Rice 

Anna L. Prescott 

Clara M. Bagley 

Hannah Y. Hathaway. . 

Ada Cowles 

Lizzie Appleton 

Belle H. Grieves 

Ida A. Howe 

Lillian F. Howe 

Charlotte I. Houghton. 
Annie W. Chickering.. 

Adeline Sanderson 

Mary B. Currier 

Emma F. Schuh 

Rebecca F. Woodberry 

Mary L. Sanderson 

Louise A. Brine 

Annie L. Savage 

Nora OLeary 

Isabella M. Prince .... 

Marion Damon 

Louisa M. AVilde 

Emeline C. Ruggles . . 

Hattie A. Hills 

Annie E. Robinson 

Carrie L. Lacount .... 

P. Jenette Teele 

Alice Simpson 



Total 






44.1 
44.5 
49.5 
54.2 
55.7 
61.0 
52.7 
59.0 
42.2 
51.5 
52 5 
61.1 
49.0 
54.9 
51.0 
55 3 
46.6 
51.0 
50 6 
45.4 
50.2 
50.0 
53.5 
52.2 
52.1 
52.5 
55.0 
51.9 
44.7 
51.4 
56.4 
31.8 
42.2 



1675.7 



bo = 



41.2 
40.7 
42.6 
51.6 
51.9 
55.3 
48.6 
53.8 
39.8 
44.0 
50.8 
55.4 
45.6 
49.1 
45.5 
52.7 
43.0 
46.5 
46.7 
43.4 
47.7 
46.7 
51.0 
49.5 
46.3 
47.9 
48.9 
47.9 
39.6 
46.3 
51.4 
28.9 
37.1 



♦J c 



Ph 



1537.4 



93.3 

91.3 

86.0 

95.2 

93.2 

90.6 

92.2 

91, 

94, 

85, 

96, 

90.6 

93.1 

89.4 

89.2 

95.3 

92.2 

91.2 

92.2 

95.6 

95.0 

93.4 

95.3 

94.8 

88.8 

91.2 

88.9 

92.1 

88.6 

90.1 

91.1 

90.9 

87.9 






91.7 



^n 00 



65 


49 


110 


18 


234 


60 


28 


35 


33 


18 


38 


22 


56 


22 


52 


3 


55 


24 


99 


7 


55 


33 


61 


13 


60 


29 


72 


43 


30 


19 


53 


36 


83 


22 


42 


31 


47 


11 


100 


63 


92 


10 


81 


18 


59 


32 


113 


20 


179 


18 


124 


192 


182 


48 


68 


18 


83 


20 


41 


12 


45 


34 


82 


26 


85 


38 



2607 



1044 



* Organized in May. 



117 



Number of primar}" schools .... 

Average whole number of pupils for the j^ear . 

Average attendance " " 

Per cent of attendance " " 

Number of tardinesses " " 

Number of dismissals " " 

Average number of pupils to a teacher . 

Number of pupils in the primary schools in December 



33 

1,675.7 
1,537.4 

91.7 
2,607 
1,044 

51 
1,808 



Great importance is attached to the schools in this department. 
The J contain forty-five per cent of all the pupils in our schools. 
The work performed in them is preparatory, — foundation work, 
— which, in consequence of its effect upon all that follows, is ever 
regarded as most important work. The children composing them 
are ingenuous, confiding, impressible, and easil}^ moulded to the 
will of those in whom they have confidence, and consequently 
require skilful treatment. The quality of teaching in these element- 
ar}'^ schools should be of the highest order. The impulse and direc- 
tion that pupils receive during their connection with them will be 
manifest throughout their entire subsequent course. 

Especiall}'^ should teachers of primary schools be in full SA^mpathy 
with their pupils. S3mpathy, more than any other thing, is the 
special need of childhood . Children should ever feel that they have 
in their teacher a sympathizing friend whom they can approach with 
confidence at all times. The following general observation is per- 
tinent : "Whenever we find ourselves losing sympathy with 
3^outhful hearts and pursuits, we may be sure that something is 
wrong with us, for it is not in the nature of the soul to grow old. 
It ma}^ grow in height and depth and breadth and power ; but the 
passage of years can bring it no decay." Teachers should witness 
with apprehension the first sj'mptom of decline in their s^^mpathy 
with their pupils, for it is an evidence that they are losing what 
must ever be regarded as an essential, fundamental element of 
success in their vocation. 

As we advance in life and feel the pressure of its cares, we 
are sometimes inclined to inquire, "What is the cause that the 
former daj^s were better than these?" and are disposed to regard 




118 

childhood as the happiest period of life. But such impressions 
are delusions which the remembrance of our own childhood 
soon dissipates. The susceptibilities of children are easih^ moved. 
They are capable of exquisite pleasure and of acute sorrow 
also. Goldsmith saj^s, " The sports of childhood satisfj^ the child." 
But their sorrows often overwhelm them too. It has been said, 
"The sorrows of childhood are not sorrows of that complicated 
and perplexing nature which sit heavily on the heart in after 3'ears ; 
but in relation to the little hearts that have to bear them, the}^ are 
overwhelming for the time." Boyd saj^s, '-Let me sa}^ to every 
one who has it in his power direct!}^ or indirectl}' to do so, do 
what you can to make children happy ! Seek to give that great 
enduring blessing, a happy youth ! Whatever after-life ma}'^ prove, 
let there be something bright to look back upon in the horizon of 
their earl}^ time." 

One teacher in this department reports no case of corporal pun - 
ishment during the }■ ear ; one reports two cases ; and another, who 
has had one of the largest schools of this grade, reports three 
cases onty. Several teachers report small numbers ; but in some 
of the schools we could wish that the numbers had been smaller. 
The impression is ver}^ general that, under proper management, 
corporal punishment is rarely a necessit}'. Before the infliction of 
punishment, it is alwa3"s wise to deliberate. Deliberation, if it 
does not suggest a better way, will tend to moderate the severit}' 
and add to the effectiveness of the punishment ; for it is not so 
much the weight of the blow that affects the recipient of it, as the 
manifest spirit and motive of the one who inflicts it. Children have 
a keen appreciation of justxe, and their intuitions are rarely at 
fault. 



119 



GRAMMAE SCHOOLS. 



Schools. 



Forster 



Prescott . 



Edgerly . . 
L. V. Bell 



Prospect Hill 



Brastow 
Bennett 
Jackson 
Webster 
Morse . . 



Beech Street ■ 
Franklin 



Lincoln . 



Cedar Street. 



Total . 



Teachers. 



George R. Bradford 

Anna M. Snow 

Frances M. Gup till. 

Editli C Long 

Helen E. Magoun . . 
Gordon A Southworth 
V. Eunice Hapgood 
Harriet N. Sands . 
Kate A Duncan . 
Frances L. Cliild. 
M. Ellen Eddy... 
Nancy W. Proctor 
Catharine T. Brown 

Clara Taylor 

Augusta M. Cowles 
Amelia I. Sears . . . 
Simeon C. Higgins 
Clara A. Battles . . 
Lydia L. Gordon.. 
Ellen M. Gooding 
Caroline S. Plimpton 
Abbie C. Hunt - 
Fannie A. Wilder 
Lydia J. Page • • 
Augusta A. Roberts 
Hattie M. Sears - . 
Ellen Ledyard .... 

Maria Miller 

Sarah E. Pernio ck 

Helen Tincker 

Lizzie W. Shelton 
Ada L. Sanborn. . . 

Wm. B. Allen 

Nellie P. Nichols . . 
Pauline S. Downes 
Helen W. Chapin. . 
Anna E. Sawyer . . 

Mary A. Haley 

Jane E Clark .... 
Lizzie C. Howe . . 
Edward E Bradbury 
Jennie Colburn .... 
Georgiana Cutter 
Margaret D. Barter 
Lizzie J. Conwell. . 



Average 
whole number. 




Per cent 
of attendance. 


u ^ 

n 


47 7 


46 3 


97.0 


62 


36.3 


34 5 


95.0 


37 


46.9 


43 9 


93 5 


73 


34.6 


32.2 


92.9 


55 


39 5 


37.2 


94 


35 


47.4 


46 5 


98 


9 


48.5 


46.9 


96.7 


10 


29.5 


28.1 


95.4 


4 


32.7 


31.2 


95 3 


9 


36 1 


34.6 


95.9 


11 


37 9 


35.7 


94.1 


11 


44.5 


42 7 


95.9 


8 


36.4 


34.7 


95 3 


23 


46.7 


44 8 


95.8 


13 


41.8 


40 1 


95 9 


46 


45.8 


42 8 


93 5 


49 


40.9 


39.8 


97.3 


8 


33 6 


32.6 


97.0 


14 


43.3 


40.7 


93.9 


21 


35.5 


33.8 


95.3 


18 


43.0 


41.8 


97.2 


24 


42.4 


39 7 


94 2 


32 


43.9 


40.4 


92.0 


25 


55.2 


52.2 


94.5 


18 


42.3 


40.7 


96 3 


77 


43.8 


40.1 


91.6 


89 


45.5 


42.5 


93.3 


71 


41.8 


38.9 


93,0 


70 


40.3 


38.5 


95 6 


81 


38.8 


36.7 


94.5 


102 


38.8 


36.7 


94.6 


84 


36.1 


34.4 


95.3 


44 


24.0 


22.7 


94.7 


49 


39.7 


38.1 


95 9 


60 


46 3 


45 5 


98.3 


14 


41.3 


37.3 


90 4 


125 


39.0 


36.8 


94.2 


86 


45.4 


43 2 


95.3 


92 


39.5 


36 6 


92.6 


65 


34 5 


32.5 


94 2 


63 


36.6 


33.5 


91.7 


10} 


45.4 


41.3 


90 8 


62 


44.7 


42 5 


95 


74 


44.9 


42.4 


96.4 


44 


31.1 


29.2 
1733.3 


94.0 
94.7 


29 


1829.9 


2099 



U CS 
(D 02 

t25 ^ 



54 
87 

24 
49 
26 

7 
29 
14 
27 
27 
56 
28 
2^4 
33 
36 
49 

4 
21 
63 
20 
34 

25 
50 
49 
51 
24 
57 
72 
45 
43 
25 
44 
46 

9 
73 
61 
81 
129 
53 
67 
69 
74 
35 

9 

1879 



* Organized in September. 



120 



45 


. 1,829.9 


. 1,733.3 


94.7 


. 2,099 


. 1,879 


41 


. 1,945 



Number of grammar schools . 

Average whole nmnber of pupils for the year 

Average attendance "' " 

Per cent of attendance " " 

Number of tardinesses " " 

Number of dismissals " " 

Average number of pupils in each school 

Number of pupils in the grammar schools in December 



In the grammar schools, during this year, there have been 408 
less tardinesses, 303 less dismissals, and 79 less punishments than 
during the preceding 3^ear. In one school there were only four 
tardinesses, and in another, only four dismissals, during the entire 
year. 

At the close of the school year in July, one hundred and twenty- 
three pupils of the grammar schools received Certificates of Grad- 
uation . 



At the Prescott School . 


39 


" Luther V. Bell School 


29 


" Forster School . 


. 24 


" Morse " 


23 


" Lincoln " 


8 



Of the graduates, 114 made apphcation for admission to the 
High School; 101 passed a satisfactory examination; and 82 
entered the school in September. 

About two thirds of the graduates of the grammar schools enter 
the High School. 



121 



The following table shows the result of the monthly examinations, 
and of the examination for admission to the High School, of pupils 
from the several grammar schools who passed a satisfactory exam- 
ination in July last. 



No. 


School. 


Averag 


e Age. 


Monthly 
Examina- 
tions. 


High School 
Examina- 
tions. 


Average. 


Arithmetic 

and 
Grammar. 


39 


Prescott 


15yrs. 


2 mos. 


80.27 


83.29 


81.78 


80.74 


29 


L. V. Bell . . 


15 " 


3 " 


74.54 


78.29 


76.41 


75.81 


24 


Forster 


15 " 


5 " 


76.59 


75.93 


76.26 


70.80 


23 


Morse 


14 " 


7 " 


81.89 


77.15 


79.52 


74.83 


8 


Lincoln 


15 " 


2 " 


82.51 


77.14 


79.82 


75.00 


123 


Average 


15 " 


2 " 


78.82 


79.50 


79.16 


76.45 



HIGH SCHOOL 



ear 



"Whole number of pupils during the 3 

Largest number at one time 

Number admitted during the 3^ear 

Number graduated . 

Whole number at the present time 

Number at the present time over 15 j^ears 

Number in course preparatory to college 

In the first class 
" second class 
'' third " . 
" fourth " . 

Number pursuing the regular course . 

" " " English " 

Average whole number for the year . 
Average attendance " " 

Per cent of attendance " " 
Niunber of tardinesses " " 



of age 





301 




226 




91 




34 




221 




173 




54 


9 




14 




22 




9 






112 




55 




206 




201.7 




97.9 




115 



122 



Number of dismissals for the 3'ear 

Number of the first class on entering the school 

Present number ...... 

Number of the second class on entering the school 
Present number ...... 

Number of the third class on entering the school 
Present number ...... 

Number of the fourth class on entering the school 
Present number ...... 



282 
83 
38 
72 
40 
81 
58 
86 
85 



GKADUATED JULY 3. 



Lillian Eliza Bagle3\ 
Ella Jane Davis. 
Mar}^ Jane Delano. 
Hattie Eleanor Dodge. 
Nellie Frances Furber. 
Florence Estelle Jerauld. 
Carrie Damon Johnson. 
Sarah Emil}^ Ke3'es. 
Ella Bennett Kilburn. 
Susie Elizabeth Moore. 
Alice Ma}^ Porter. 
Emma Frances Porter. 
Alice Amanda Proctor. 
Emma Thompson Russell. 



Catherine Marie Shannon. 
Carrie Maria Sibley. 
Emma Alice Steele. 
Cora Leishman Tyler. 
Thomas Moulton Durell. 
Joseph Winn Fiske. 
John Walter Kelle3^ 
Joseph E. B. Lovering. 
Albert Freeman Mason. 
Frank Hay ward Richardson. 
William Edward Robinson. 
Paul Junkins Smith. 
Stephen INIarvin Sullivan. 
Samuel Briggs Willis. 



OF THE COURSE PREPARATORY TO COLLEGE. 

* Henry Cutler Baldwin. * William Henr}^ Hills. 
William Goss Crocker. t Laura Adams Elliott. 

* Arthur Cj-rus Hill. -fMary Katharine Pike. 

We have graduated 30 per cent of all pupils who entered the 
school from 1858 to 1864, inclusive ; 42.05 per cent of all who 
entered from 1865 to 1870, inclusive ; and 48.09 per cent of all who 
entered in 1871 and 1872. Average for fourteen years, 41 per cent. 

Fifteen per cent of all the graduates entered college. 

* Entered Harvard College. f Entered Boston University. 



123 



The following named pupils, graduates of the grammar schools, 
passed a satisfactory examination for admission to the High School. 



EROM PRESCOTT 

Chas. F. Aiken. 
John Durant. 
Frank E. Furber. 
Owen E. Golden. 
Fred. A. Rumne3^ 
Walter H. Milliken. 
Louis II. Mudgett. 
Harry Porter. 
Arthur W. Sanborn. 
Harland H. Totman. 
Wm. S. Woodcock. 
Hiram G. Hammett. 
Jennie Appleton. 
Nellie Coburn. 
Nellie Cole. 
Hattie II. Colgrove. 
Sarah E. Davis. 
Gertrude Edmands. 
Nella L. Fitch. 



SCHOOL. 

Ellen Hanson. 
Bertha P. Josl3^n. 
Nellie Kauler. 
Ella Knight. 
Abbie S. Laighton. 
Adeline E. Lovering. 
Josie D. INIelvin. 
Carrie F. Meserve. 
Gratia M. Moore. 
Emily S. Overlock. 
Annie F. Page. 
Annie S. Preston. 
Eunice W. Shedd. 
Ada L. Snow. 
Ella A. Tarbell. 
Belle G. Taylor. 
Carrie M. Taylor. 
Martha W. Tenney. 
Carrie M. Uihlein. 



LUTHER 

James L. Bowlbj^ 
John G. Ilayw^ard. 
Edward K Hewlett. 
John H. Holmes. 
Fred H. Osgood. 
Wm. E. Plummer. 
Jones N. Robinson. 
Lewis J. Smith. 
Ervin W. Snow. 
Orville L. Story. 



Y. BELL. 

B. R. Twombly. 
E. Clifford Walker. 
Celia II. Canfield. 
Mary J. Coakle}^ 
Lottie IM. Farrington. 
Minnie L. Flagg. 
Minnie W. Jackson. 
Carrie H. Parker. 
Ella Sampson. 
Jennie B. Warren. 



FORSTER SCHOOL. 



Frank E. Davis. 
Wm. F. Lovejo}'. 
Chas. L. Morss. 



Chas. E. Sanborn. 
Chas. F. Williams. 
John H. Corbett. 



124 



George H. Thompson. 
Lydia E. Berry. 
Amelia G. Brown. 
Corinne Cutter. 
Nellie F. Davis. 
Emma J. Dodd. 
Cora W. Foster. 



Hattie L. Furber. 
CM. Maynard. 
Alice H. Murch. 
Nida M. Pennock. 
Flora I. Towle. 
Sarah L. Winn. 
Abbie M. Bennis. 
Mary P. Banks. 



MOKSE 
Chas. W. Merritt. 
John Finnon. 
John D. Ballard. 
Alden N. Libby. 
Rolla J. Butman. 
Wm. J. McDermott. 
Wm. W. Sartwell. 

Marilla A. 

LINCOLN 
Alex. M. Graham. 
Ella N. Bickford. 
L. Gertrude Bullard. 



SCHOOL. 

G. Ernest Lane. 

Lillian E. Tower. 

E. Louis Tibbetts. 

Josie C. Leuchte. 

Hattie F. Johnson. 

Hattie F. Homer. 

Lizzie Robertson. 
Woodworth. 

SCHOOL. 

Addie L. Buss. 
Lillie M. Fiske. 
Hallie M. Hood. 



Hattie A. Packard. 

PUPILS ADMITTED TO THE HIGH SCHOOL DURING 
THE YEAR FROM SCHOOLS OUTSIDE OF CITY. 

SECOND CLASS. 

September. Ida May Blaikie, from Bridge water Normal School. 
" E. H. L. Gilman, from Amherst High School. 

THIRD CLASS. 

January. Maude M. Hobson, from Roxbury High School. 
" Ella H. Hood, from Lynn High School. 

FOURTH CLASS. 

May. Fannie C. Hartwell, from Taunton High School. 

September. Frederick W. Archer, from Brookline grammar 
school. 

" Sarah A. Clarke, from Cambridge grammar school. 

" Rosa C. Safford, from East Boston grammar school. 

'• Grace W. Dane, from private school. 



125 



ATTEND A:N^CE. 

The following table represents the number of pupils in each of the 
thirteen classes in December, each 3"ear, for the last five 3^ears, the per 
cent that the number of pupils in each class is of the whole number, and 
the average for those 3^ears. 







1873, 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 




School. 


Class- 


*©:? 

&& 


Percent 


©.2 
26 


Per cent 


"Si 

31 


Per cent 




Per cent 


•Si 
38 


Per cent 
.956 




Per cer t 


High . . 


1 


29 


.927 


.769 


.855 


34 


.917 


31.6 


.890 




2 


33 


1.055 


34 


1.006 


38 


1.048 


40 


1.079 


40 


1.007 


37.0 


1.03J 


L 


3 


50 


1.598 


44 


1.302 


52 


1.434 


67 


1.538 


58 


1.459 


52.2 


1.465 


f 


4 


69 


2.206 


82 


2.425 


72 


1.986 


79 


2.131 


85 


2.139 


77.4 


2.373 


Grammar 


5 


116 


3.708 


122 


3.60S 


139 


3.834 


143 


3.857 


126 


3.171 


129.2 


3.626 


' 


6 


175 


5.595 


187 


5.532 


178 


4.909 


160 


4 315 


172 


4.328 


174.4 


4.895 




7 


269 


8.600 


247 


7.305 


235 


6.481 


237 


6.392 


266 


6.693 


250.8 


7.039 




8 


289 


9.239 


306 


9.051 


347 


9.570 


307 


10.706 


411 


10.342 


350.0 


9.823 




9 


341 


10.901 


407 


12.038 


441 


12.162 


391 


10.545 


437 


10.997 


403.4 


11.32i 


T 


10 


409 


13.076 


447 


13.222 


466 


12.851 


512 


13.808 


533 


13.412 


473.4 


13.274 


Primary, 


11 


337 


10.774 


401 


11.858 


378 


10.425 


466 


12.568 


470 


11.827 


410.4 


11.518 




12 


266 


8.504 


340 


10.056 


431 


11.886 


426 


11.486 


516 


12.985 


395.8 


11.108 




13 


745 


23.817 


738 


21.823 


818 


22.559 


766 


20.658 


822 


20.684 


777.8 


21.82S 


Total . . 




3,148 


100. 


3,381 


100. 


3,626 


100. 


3,708 


100. 


3,974 


100. 


3,563 


100. 



Taking the average number of pupils in the several classes in Decem- 
ber of each year for the last five years, as a basis of computation, we 
obtain the following results : — 
Xo. of pupils in First Class was 85.4 per cent of the No. in Second Class. 



Second 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 

Eighth 

Ninth 

Tenth 

Eleventh 

Twelfth 



70.8 
67.4 
51.0 
74 1 
69.1 
71.6 
86.7 
85.2 
115.3 
103.7 
50.8 



Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 

Eighth 

Ninth 

Tenth 

Eleventh 

Twelfth 

Thirteentli 



126 

From the foregoing tables we derive the following items : — 

During the last five 3^ears the primary schools have contained 
44.5 percent of the pupils in all the schools ; the grammar schools 
have contained 50 per cent ; and the High School, 5.5 per cent. 

One half of all the pupils in the Grammar Schools have been in 
the fifth and sixth classes, one third in the third and fourth classes, 
and one sixth in the first and second classes. 

In the grammar schools, the — 

No. of pupils in First Class has been 27 per cent of No. in Sixth Class. 

" " Second " 36.6 " " " 

" u Third " 53 " " <' 

u u Fourth " 74 " " " 

u ii j^ifth <' 85 " " " 

About one fourth of all the pupils who enter the grammar schools 
complete the entire course of study prescribed for those schools, and 
graduate. 

These items present to us the most discouraging feature of our 
schools. It is a cause of deep regret, and of unpleasant apprehen- 
sion in regard to our future, that so large a proportion of our 
pupils fail to secure the full benefits of our liberal S3'stem of 
education. 

We must look for the remedy in an improA'ed public sentiment 
in regard to the importance of education, and the desirableness of 
a sj'stematic and extended course of instruction and training. 

As teachers and school officers, we must earnestly employ all the 
means at our disposal to render our schools profitable and attrac- 
tive, and must omit no proper influence to induce our pupils to 
avail themselves of all the advantages so generous^ afforded them. 

A large proportion of our pupils receive their only instruction in 
the lower grades of our schools. Hence the importance of placing 
those schools under the best instruction that the means afforded us 
can secure. Since large numbers leave school at all stages of ad- 
vancement, every teacher should labor constantly with the feeling 
that many of his pupils are receiving from him their last school in- 
struction, and should direct his efforts accordingly. 



» 



» 



127 



COUESE OF STUDY. 

The pupils composing the schools may be grouped into five 
divisions, as follows : 

1. Those who do not complete the full course of the grammar 
schools, being about three fourths of all who enter those schools. 

2. Those who graduate at the grammar schools but do not 
enter the High School, being about one third of the graduates. 

3. Those who enter the High School, but do not complete the 
full course, being about fifty-nine per cent of all who enter the 
school. 

4. Those who graduate at the High School and enter at once 
upon the active duties of life, being about eighty-five per cent of 
the graduates. 

5. Those who pass from the High School to higher institutions 
of learning. 

Since it is impracticable to have more than one course of study 
in the primary and grammar schools, all of the five classes of 
pupils specified must be educated together during the time of their 
continuance in those schools. 

No course of.study can be arranged that will be exactly adapted 
to pupils whose pursuits in life will be numerous and varied. We 
are compelled therefore, to adopt such a course as will secure the 
highest good of the largest number. The studies of each year must 
be adapted to the age and mental development of those who are to 
pursue them, and preparatory also to the studies of subsequent 
3'ears. As far as possible, those studies which will be of the highest 
practical value to those who leave school before the}^ complete the 
full course should be placed first in the course. 

Since it is impossible for us to foresee what will be required of 
our pupils in their various occupations, or how extensive will be 
their pursuit of knowledge, we should endeavor to lay such a foun- 
dation in the elementary schools as will be adapted to any super- 
structure. 

All who graduate at the grammar schools may profitablj^ pursue 
the same course of study in those schools, since the qualifications 



128 

essential for admission to the High School are identical with those 
most useful in the ordinary pursuits of life. 

To meet the manifest requirements of the community, three 
courses of study have been arranged for the High School, — an Eng- 
lish or Mercantile Course ; a regular English and Classical Course ; 
and a Classical Course especially adapted to th5 wants of pupils 
who wish to prepare for college. 

Pupils who do not intend to remain in the school the full term of 
four years, usually adopt the English Course ; hence, for their spe- 
cial benefit, those studies which are of the highest practical impor- 
tance are placed first in this course. 

At present I am unable to see wherein the course of study for 
the various departments of the schools can be modified to the advan- 
tage of any one of the five classes of pupils specified, without detri- 
ment to the remaining classes. 

EYENIKG SCHOOLS. 

The evening school which was opened the first week in Decem- 
ber, 1875, was continued until March 31 of the present year. It 
was divided into two divisions. Each division met three times a 
week upon alternate evenings. 

Whole number registered . . . . . . 251 

Boys, 185 ; girls, 66. 
Average attendance . . . . . . . 97 

Bo3^s, 82 ; girls, 15. 
Number of teachers ........ 6 

Male teachers, 3 ; female teachers, 3. 

Cost of tuition $756.00 

Total cost $1,100.00 

The school was reopened in the hall of the Luther V. Bell 
School-house Monday evening, Nov. 13. Average attendance, 
about fifty, including both males and females. 



129 



MONTHLY KEPORTS OF TRUA:N'T OFFICER. 



1876. 



January . . . . 
February . . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

September. . 

October 

November . . 

December . . 

Total 



Cases 
investigated. 



31 

26 

66 

100 

12 

16 

117 

115 

92 

72 



647 



Cases of 
truancy. 



16 
10 
20 
25 
10 
15 
19 
23 
22 
14 



Arrests. 



Absentees placed 
in school. 



174 



19 
2 



21 



Truant Officer, Eli A. Smith. 



POPULATIO:^' AND VALUATION. 

Population of the cit}', census of 1875 . . . 21,594 

Valuation of the city, May 1, 1876 . . . $26,573,400 00 

Personal estate .... $2,978,800.00 

Real estate .... $23,594,600.00 

Estimated value of school property . . . $436,350 00 



» 



130 



EXPENDITURES. 



BY THE CITY COUNCIL. 


Repairs ...... 


$8,930 88 


Furniture ...... 


504 32 


Insurance 


888 70 


Rent ....... 


401 00 


Fuel 


3,987 75 


BY THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 


Teachers' salaries .... 


66,600 34 


Superintendent's salary 


2,500 00 


Janitors' salaries ..... 


3,283 74 


Truant officer's salary .... 


1,000 00 


Water ....... 


370 42 


Gas , . 


348 28 


Printing ...... 


315 36 


Books for indigent pupils and evening 




school ...*.. 


788 91 


Writing books ..... 


496 72 


Stationery and other school supplies 


929 29 


Miscellaneous . . . , . 


511 16 



$14,712 65 



Total expenditures 



77,144 22 

91,856 87 



RECEIPTS. 






Tuition of non-resident pupils 


$144 04 


• 


Rent of school halls .... 


27 00 




Sundries, 


58 00 


229 04 




• • 


Net expenditures .... 


$91,627 83 



131 



HEALTH. 

The education of our public schools is mainly intellectual ; but 
it shoulcl have respect also to physical training and moral culture. 
A vigorous body, as the habitation of a sound and well-disciplined 
mind, and high moral principles to control and ennoble all, are mat- 
ters of vital importance. Any system of education, therefore, is 
defective that does not aim at the elevation and improvement of our 
entire being, — ph3^sical, intellectual, and moral. 

We will consider, briefly, the effect of our schools upon the bodily 
health and strength of our pupils. 

The mind and the body are so intimately connected, harm cannot 
come to one without producing injury to the other. Hence, while 
we are endeavoring to cultiA^ate and enrich the intellect, we should 
never lose sight of the importance of guarding against every influ- 
ence detrimental to ph^^sical health, and of cultivating, constantly, 
such habits as are essential to its preservation and increase. 

The unwelcome fact is ever presenting itself to our observation, 
that, with all the improvements of modern times in systems of 
education, there is a gradual diminution of physical energy, of 
manl}^ vigor. It becomes us, therefore, to consider seriously how 
far this result is justly chargeable upon the schools, and to what 
extent we are personally responsible. 

In the consideration of this matter, the following question claims 
attention : Are we requiring of our pupils more mental labor than 
can be performed by them, in the allotted time, without detriment 
to ph3^sical health and strength? 

From the almost illimitable range of studies, a selection has been 
adopted, by mutual consent, of such as seem best adapted to pre- 
pare the young for the ordinary duties of life, and to form the basis 
of a more extended course of study. The extent to which the 
studies assigned to the schools shall be pursued, and the apportion- 
ment of the work among the several classes, are based upon an 
estimate of the capabilities of pupils of ordinary health and mental 
capacity. 

Pupils of more than medium ability can complete the work of the 



132 

schools in less time than is required for those of ordinary capacity ; 
since the regulations of the School Board provide, that individual 
promotions may be made whenever, in the judgment of the teacher, 
the subcommittee, and the Superintendent, the interests of pupils 
require them. Pupils of feeble health or limited capacity are not 
restricted to any specified time for the completion of the course of 
stud}' prescribed. It is apparent, therefore, that our school system 
is sutficientl}^ flexible to meet the conditions of all classes of pupils. 

After years of careful observation I am decided in the opinion, 
that, with judicious management on the part of teachers, no pupil 
of ordinar}" health and average mental capacity need receive injury 
from the performance of school requirements, in the allotted time ; 
and hence conclude that the demands of the schools are not 
excessive. 

There are, however, in almost every school, ambitious pupils of 
feeble health and limited ph^^sical endurance, and pupils who have 
been promoted prematurel}^, who are receiving permanent injur}' 
from their attempts to meet the requirements of the schools in the 
time allotted to pupils who are enabled by vigorous health, suitable 
age, and previous study to perform their work with ease. 

General regulations cannot meet each individual need. But 
parents and teachers, from daily observation, have ample opportu- 
nities to judge correctly of the effect of school work upon each pupil 
under their charge. To their vigilance, therefore, we must look 
for protection from harm of pupils of the classes specified. 

I apprehend that most of the ill health of pupils consequent upon 
their connection with the schools is occasioned by their exposure 
to frequent and sudden changes of temperature, and currents of 
cold air from open doors and windows, and from imperfect modes 
of heating and ventilating school-rooms. 

Twenty-nine of our school-rooms are heated b}' means of stoves, 
— the most objectionable of all modes yet devised ; twent}", by the 
passage of steam through pipes located in the rooms, — onl}' a 
slight improvement upon the method of heating by stoves ; twenty- 
nine, by furnaces ; and two, the large rooms in the High School 
building, by means of warm air from coils of steam pipe located 
outside of the rooms. This last method I regard the best yet in- 



133 

vented, nnless the substitution of hot water for steam, in heating 
the coils, is an improvement. 

Our modes of ventilating are similar to those in general use ; but 
they are altogether inadequate, and are nearly useless in calm 
weather, when artificial means of ventilation are most needed. 

It is well known that the life-sustaining element of the atmos- 
phere, which constitutes about twenty-one per cent of its volume, is 
rapidl}^ diminished b}^ its passage through the lungs in the process 
of breathing, and that carbonic acid nearly equal in quantity to the 
loss of oxj'genis emitted. At each respiration, about 4. .^5 per cent 
of carbonic acid is added to the air, and about 4.78 per cent of oxy- 
gen is removed. Since the average number of respirations is about 
twenty each minute, and the average quantity of air inspired b}^ a 
person in a state of rest is twenty cubic inches at each respiration, 
it is apparent that the air of an imperfectly ventilated school-room 
must soon become vitiated. 

When to the air in this condition is added various odors from 
the clothing of pupils, and noxious gases from imperfect or improp- 
erly managed heating apparatus, the teacher is strongly tempted to 
obtain relief through open doors and windows. But during the 
season when artificial heat is required, which in our climate is 
from September to June, the temperature of the external air is 
so much below the proper temperature of the air within the school- 
room, it cannot be admitted while the pupils are at rest, without 
exposing them to sudden colds which are liable to result in injurious 
if not fatal consequences. 

The evils resulting from imperfect ventilation can be remedied 
only by the constant admission into the school-room of large quan- 
tities of pure air at a temperature suitable for health and comfort, 
and the exclusion of a similar quantity of air through large venti- 
ducts artificially heated to produce a strong current. 

Under such circumstances, pupils would not be exposed to sud- 
den changes of temperature and the air of the school-room, at all 
times, would be pure and healthful. 

Such an arrangement would require a larger consumption of fuel, 
but the additional cost would be compensated for many times by 
the improvement in the health and comfort of schools which would 
ensue. 



134 

We ma}^ confidently expect that the time will soon come when 
the sanitary condition of school-rooms will receive greater attention 
in the construction of school buildings, and that existing evils will 
be remedied at any cost. Meanwhile, we must endeavor by con- 
stant vigilance to diminish as far as possible the consequences of 
existing defects. 

Teachers should become familiar with the working of the heating 
apparatus, and should insist that the fires be graduated to conform 
to the temperature of the atmosphere. They should consult their 
thermometers frequently, and maintain in their rooms a uniform 
temperature of about 70°. Under no circumstances should pupils 
be exposed to currents of cold air while they are seated at their 
desks. Janitors should be required to ventilate the school- rooms 
thoroughly, at the close of each session, and the air should be 
changed during every recess, at which time, whenever the condition 
of the weather will permit, all the pupils should be required to 
leave their rooms and should be encouraged to engage in healthful 
sports in the open air. 

CONCLUSION. 

For man}^ years popular education has been a prominent theme 
of discussion. It has received the thoughtful consideration of the 
best minds in every enlightened community', and has been presented 
in every conceivable aspect. In respect to it, the question is perti- 
nent, " Is there anything whereof it may be said. See, this is new? 
it hath been of old time which was before us." But there are cer- 
tain standard thoughts pertaining to this important subject which 
— like the moral code — are always timel}', and should ever be 
kept prominently before the minds of those who direct the education 
of the 3^oung. 

Methods are ever changing. Courses of study undergo various 
modifications to adapt them to the ever-varying demands of com- 
munities ; but principles are immutable ; the elements of our 
common humanity remain unchanged ; the constituents of the 
mind do not vary ; and the laws of development and growth are 
permanent. Each new pupil requires the exercise of the same 
agencies for his information and development that have been sue- 



135 

cessfullj" applied to all who ha^e preceded him. The old familiar 
paths which we have traversed until their noveltj" has disappeared, 
will present numerous and varied attractions to the youthful trav- 
eller at ever3^ step of his advancement. 

Each succeeding year presents to us additional incentives to the 
faithful appliance of all the means of education at our disposal. 
The demands of society are ever increasing. Higher qualifications 
and more liberal culture than formerly are now requisite to attain 
high social positions, and to fill acceptably places of trust and 
emolument. 

When our pupils pass from our tuition, they should not only be 
well versed in the rudiments of learning and ampl}^ furnished with 
important knowledge, but, in consequence of the thorough training 
of the schools, should possess the ability to make a skilful applica- 
tion of what the}' have acquired, since their success in life will 
depend more upon what the}^ can do than upon what they know. 

It has been well said, "Teaching has never done its perfect work, 
until b}' training the mind has learned to run in accustomed chan- 
nels, until it sees what is true and feels what is right, with the 
clearness, force, and promptitude which come only from long-con- 
tinued habit." 

Skill in the performance of whatever may be required of us is 
the result, mainl}^, of previous preparation, through long-continued 
effort. It has passed into a proverb: "Tell me what a man has 
been doing, and I will tell you what he is." 

" Our deeds have travelled with us from afar, 
And what we have been makes us what we are." 

The young are educated not so much by what is communicated 
to them as by what is wrought out by them. The most successful 
teacher, therefore, is not the one who imparts the greatest amount 
of information, but rather the one who succeeds best in stimulating 
his pupils to patient study and careful investigation, who teaches 
the art of self-culture, how to gather knowledge most successfulh' 
from the written page and the ever-open book of nature, and how 
to apply most skilfully the knowledge acquired. 

As teachers and school officers we cannot emphasize too strongly 



136 

the irnportance of the work in which we are enlisted, nor unduly 
intensify our interest and zeal in its accomplishment. 

Horace Mann once said, "If instead of twenty-one years, the 
course of nature allowed but twentj^-one days to rear an infant to 
the full stature of manhood, and to sow in his bosom the seeds of 
unbounded happiness or of unspeakable miseiy, I suppose, in that 
case, the merchant would abandon his bargains, and the farmer 
would leave the ingathering of his harvests, and that twentj-one 
days would be spent without much sleep and with many prayers." 
But the remoteness of causes does not affect materially the charac- 
ter of their results. 

Having accepted the responsibility delegated to us, of directing 
the education of the youth of our city, we should labor most 
earnestly to accomplish for them all that could be secured by affec- 
tionate and judicious parents under the most favorable circum- 
stances. With conscientious fidelity, we should guard and promote 
their physical health and strength, develop their bodil}' and mental 
powers, store their minds with useful knowledge, and assist them 
in acquiring skill in the practical application of what thej^ know. 
We are to shield them from pernicious moral influences, cultivate 
in them noble aspirations, and stimulate them to the practice of 
every virtue. To the utmost extent of our abilit}", we are to pre- 
pare them for the successful accomplishment of their life-work. 

Respectfull}^ submitted. 

J. H. DAYIS, 
Superintendent of Public Schools. 
Dec. 30, 1876. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SOMERVILLE MYSTIC WATER BOARD, 



1876. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, Feb. 19, 1877. 

Received, accepted, and referred to the Committee on Printing witli 
instructions to print tlie same in the Annual Report of the city. Sent 
down for concurrence. 

CHARLES E. OILMAN, Clerk. 



Concurred in. 



In Common Council, Feb. ^9, 1877^ 



SOLOMON DAVIS, Clerk. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Water Board, Somerville, February 15, 1877. 

To the City Council of the City of Somerville : 

The Somerville Mystic Water Board respectfully submit their 
Annual Report, for the year ending December 31, 1876 : 

Presenting in detail a statement of the quantity and size of pipe 
laid, and the number of fire hydrants and stop gates set during the 
past year ; also a statement of the progress and condition of the 
works at the expiration of the j^ear 1876. 

Three additional stand pipes for the supply of watering-carts 
have been set the past year, at the request of the Committee of 
the City Council on watering streets. 

The total amount of distribution pipe laid in the streets of the 
city to December 31, 1876, is 43 miles, 3,853 feet ; number of stop 
gates set, 340 ; number of fire hydrants set, 245 ; of which 1 mile, 
1,514 feet of pipe, 25 stop gates, and 9 post h3'drants have been 
laid and set during the year 1876. 

During the j^ear, 137 new service pipes have been laid, the 
aggregate length of which is 4,625 feet. 

The average cost of each service pipe is S21.33. 

Water is now supplied to 3,086 dwelling-houses ; 4,418 families ; 
106 shops and stores, 24 manufactories, 514 stables, andneaily all 
the public buildings, being an increase of 133 dwelling-houses, 
187 families, 4 stores, 1 manufactory, and six stables, during the 
year 1876. 

The water fixtures now in use are designated as follows, viz , 
4,538 sinks, 909 taps, 804 bath-tubs, 936 wash hand basins, 982 
pan, 786 self-acting, and 85 hopper water-closets ; 41 private 
hydrants, 27 urinals, 6 fountains, and 491 hand hose. 

There are now vacant 281 houses, 58 stables, and 25 stores. 



140 

About three fourths of the houses vacant are arranged for two 
families. 

There has been no complaint of trouble from frozen water mains 
or service pipes during the past 3'ear, and the Boaid believe that 
in the future there will be little to be feared from frozen pipes. 

During the past 3'ear, action has been taken by this Board in 
regard to placing the fire h3'drants in charge of the Fire Depart- 
ment, which has resulted in the passage of an order by the City 
Council to that effect. 

In consequence of the caving of the trench for the new main 
sewer constructed in West Somerville, much damage has been 
caused to the distribution and service pipes on Beacon, Mosland, and 
Elm Streets, giving great inconveni* nee to the water takers on the 
line of those streets The Hoard has, under the circunastances, 
taken every me^ans in its power to lessen the damage caused to the 
water takers by the conve3'ance of water to their houses and 
stables, until such time as the completion of the sewer would allow 
the repairs to be made on the water pipes. 

In the last report submitted by this Board, reference was made 
to the steps which had been taken towards obtaining a modifica- 
tion of the Water Contract between the city of Charlestown and 
the town of Somerville, dated Sept. 21, 1868, and the hope was 
expressed that erelong a modified contract would be presented for 
the consideration of the City Council. Circumstances entirely 
beyond the control of this Board have occurred preventing any 
decision in the matter. During the past year the subject was 
referred by the Water Committee of the Boston City Council (to 
whom it was originally referred) to the Mystic Water Board of 
Boston, and another hearing was given, at which members of this 
Board were present, and the facts in the case, on the part of Som- 
erville, presented to the best of their ability. 

The following, which is taken from the last report of the M3^stic 
Water Board to the Boston Cit3^ Council, dated June 20, 1876, 
fully explains the result of the hearing before that Board, viz. : 

*' The petition from the cities of Chelsea and Somerville, and 
the town of Everett, for a modification of contracts with them, 
which was presented to the City Council, and referred to the Joint 



141 

Standing Committee on Water, after one hearing by them was 
referred by the committee to this Board, with a request that they 
would report what modifications, if any, should be made in the 
contracts. The Board, after several interviews and hearings with 
representatives of the Water Boards of each of the places named, 
and a careful consideration of the matter, came to the conclusion 
that it would be unwise to make the changes asked for by the peti- 
tioners, and that if anything was done it should be to make an 
entirely new contract, based upon the altered state of things 
growing out of the annexation of Charlestown to Boston ; and 
that this could be done better by the Boston Water Board, when 
appointed, who would have charge of both the Cochituate and 
Mystic Works, than it could be by any existing Board, and they 
so reported to the committee." 

Subsequent to the report from which the above quotation is 
made, the Water Committee of the Boston City Council reported, 
recommending that the subject be referred to the new Water Hoard 
of Boston, whicii recommendation was adopted, and the whole 
matter is now in the hands of that Board. 

The works during the 3^ear 1876 have been under the general 
superintendence of Mr. Benjamin Almy, who has performed his 
duties in a faithful and satisfactory manner. 

The engineering has been under the direction of Mr. George A. 
Kimball, the City Engineer, who has responded cheerfully to any 
call made upon him. 

You are referred to the report of the Superintendent, herewith 
presented, containing a tabular statement of the amount of pipe 
laid, and other work performed during the year 1876, as also an 
inventory of stock and tools on hand at the workshop. 

The cost of the works is as follows : — 

Value Dec. 31, 1875, $321,047 84 

Expended during the year 1876, including stock 

now on hand, 6,184 49 

Value of 3 stand pipes, 225 00 

Total, $327,457 33 



142 

The Board desire to express their thanks to the Commissioners, 
Registrar, and Superintendent of the Mystic Water Works for 
courtesies extended to them the past year. 

During the long time the members of the Board have been asso- 
ciated together, they have endeavored faithfully and conscien- 
tiously to perform the duties assigned them ; have in all cases 
where, in their judgment, the interest of the town or city would 
admit, granted the petition of the ( itizens for the laying of distri- 
bution pipes ; and transfer to the care of their successors in office 
the 43 miles of distribution pipe, with the appurtenances thereto 
belonging, in good working order. 

C. E. EYMES. 

CUTLEE DOWNER. 

THOMAS CUNNINGHAM. 

HORACE HASKINS. 

R. A. yiNAL. 



14:3 



Oh 
t— I 

Ph 

P^ 

O ^ 



H 




t::) 


tH 


W 




1— 1 


kH 


« 


P5 


H 
1— 1 


<1 


ft 


;^ 


O 


1-5 


w 


O 

H 


H 














> 


h5 


P^ 


<1 


W 


H 
O 
H 


o 

05 



o 

w 

CO 

H 

H 
H 



Qi 

Ph 

r— 1 
1— 1 

O 

H 




2,339.4 
1,514 


3,853.4 


CO 




CO 


Feet. 
2-inch. 


1,747 


T— 1 


Feet. 
3-inch. 


7,446.5 
474 


d 


Feet. 
4-incli. 


84,558 
2,449 


00 


Feet. 
6-inch. 


88.911.7 
2,399 


d 
co^ 

05 


Feet. 
8-inch. 


28,277.6 
1,472 


29,749.6 


Feet. 
10-inch. 


CO 
00 


CO 

00 


Feet. 
12-inch. 


CO 

ocT 


8,542.6 






Laid previous to 1876. 
Laid in 1876 . . . 


o 

H 



144 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Somerville Mystic Water Board : 

Gentlemen, — My fourth Annual Report as Superintendent of 
the Somerville Mystic Water Works is respectfully submitted, 
comprising a statement of all work performed under my care dur- 
ing the year 1876, and also an inventory of materials and tools on 
hand Januar}^ 1, 1877. 





Pipe Laid in 1876. 
Size of Pipe laid. 


Gates set 1876. 


70 

<u 
Jt 

s 
2 

>» 

33 

1 
2 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 

9 


.2* 
'5. 

si 


Stbbbts. 


Feet. 

8-in. 


Feet. 
6-in. 


Feet. 
4-in. 


Feet. 
3-in. 


8-in. 


6-in 


4-in. 


3-in 


•a 


Avon • 










10^ 
22i 


Bruadway from Weston Av.dead end 

Broadway, at New Cross 

Bow Street Place — a dead end ... 


1,433 
39 








1 


1 
1 




1 


230 


14 


300 
70 




Brooks, froiTi Main to Heath ..... 




190 




Broadway Place — a dead end . . • • 






Beacon, at Park Street 










Columbus Avenue, at Warren Ave. . 














Conwell Avenue 












7 


Cherry, at Kim 














1 
I 
2 

1 


1 
2 




CJoltage Avenue, from Chester Street 
D »y, Irom Elm •*•.. 






227 
615 


















1 
1 
1 


8 


L)urham. from Beacon ..•••... 




468 


8 


Elm at Wiliow Avenue 








* * 




Flint, at Crosd 














Glen, at Flint 










* 




Heath, at Brooks 
















Herbert, from Day to Chester .... 






380 

187 

14 

65 

10 




* * 


* 


1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

*1 
13 




HafiBon, from bkelian to Durham . . 








* 






Leon, from Concord Ave., a dead end 






104 




1 




Moore, north from Mead, a dead end 








Mrdn, from Broi dwav to Brooks . . 




640 
63 




Munroe, east from W^alnut 










Mossland, at Elm 






New Cross, from Broadway, dead end 
Pitman 




247 








1 




426 
145 








Pierce Court — a deadend 










l' 




Professor's Kow, from Curtis .... 




358 
203 




Professor's Kow, from College Ave. . 




323 








Rush, from Pearl to Flint 




6i 


Sacramento, ai Beacon . • 










1 


Witrgles worth, from Otis 

Washington, corner Hawkins .... 
Washington, at Beacon 




. . . 


143 


. . . 


. . 


8 












* * 


9 






1,472 


2,399 


2,449 


474 


1 


77i 



145 



HYDRANTS MOVED ON^ ACC0U:N'T OF STREET 
IMPROVEMENTS. 

Beacon Street, at corner Sacramento, 1 

Beacon " opposite Forest Street, Cambridge, 1 

Concord Avenue, near Leon Street, 1 

Channcey Avenue discontinued, 1 

Repaired thirtj'-seven leaks on main pipes, four charged to 
Patent Water and Gas Pipe Company, being guaranteed by them 
for five years, amounting to $29 ; repacked ten gates, put new valves 
into twent3'-one lij'drants, replaced seven gate boxes and one flush 
hydrant box opposite School Street, Broadway ; cleaned forty-two 
corporation taps filled with rust, set three stand pipes for wateiing 
streets, two on Somerville Avenue below Union Square and one 
on Washington Street, corner of Boston Street. 

MATERIALS ON HAND AT COST. 







PIPE LINED. 




27 feet 12 in. at 


SI 00 


S27 00 


35 '^ 


10 " 


90 


31 50 


112 " 


8 - 


75 


84 00 


287 " 


6 '' 


45 


129 15 


168 '' 


4 '' 


28 


47 04 


182 '' 


3 '- 


24 


43 68 




* 


PIPE NOT LINED. 




203 feet 10 in. at 


$0 75 


$152 25 


77 " 


8 " 


58 


44 66 


1,113 " 


6 *^ 




389 55 


413 '' 


4 '' 




94 99 



$362 a7 



681 45 

Sleeves 21 ft. 3in., 17 ft. 8 in., and 
74 ft. 6 in., 

Amount carried forward, $1,043 82 

10 



146 



Amount hrought forward^ 



$1,043 82 



SHEET-IRON BRANCHES LINED, 



7 double 4 on 6 at 




$2 25 


$15 75 


3 " 4 tc 4 'i 




2 10 


6 30 


2 single 3 " 4 '• 




2 00 


4 00 


2 '' 3 " 3 " 




2 00 


4 00 


2iinlined3 '' 6 '' 


ST-IRON 


1 75 

PIPE AND BRANC 


3 50 


CA 


mES. 


16 feet 8 in. 


800 lbs 


. at $0 02i 


$18 00 


15 *' 6 " 


500 


02i 


11 25 


12 '' 4 " 


270 


02| 


6 07 


1 '' 4 *' J turn 


55 


03 


1 65 


1 '* 4 " special 


casting, 




3 60 


1 '^ 4 " sleeve, 


19 11)8 


• 


57 


2 " 6 '' sleeves, 


47 *' 

^ST-IRON 


at 03 

BRANCHES, NOT 


1 41 


c^ 


LINED. 


1 double 6 on 6 


82 lbs. 


at $0 03J 


$2 87 


4 '' 4 *' 6 


304 ' 


03J 


10 64 


5 "' 4 " 4 


285 ' 


031 


9 97 


1 single 6 '* 8 


94 ' 


' 03j- 


3 29 


5 " 4 '' 6 


315 ' 


03i- 


11 02 


5 '' 4 '' 4 


235 " 03J 

CAST-IRON BRANCHES LIN 


8 22 




ED. 


2 double 4 on 6 






$S 00 


1 '' 4 *' 4 






3 50 


1 single 4 " 8 






4 50 



4 inch good order at 
4 to be repaired *' 



HYDRANTS ON HAND. 

$50 00 $200 00 

45 00 180 00 



33 55 



42 55 



46 01 



]6 00 



380 00 



Amount carried forward^ 



$1,561 93 



147 

Amount brought forward., - $1,561 93 

GATES ON HAND. 

2 4 inch at $15 30 $30 60 

3 3 " 12 60 37 80 
15 gate frames and covers, 86 25 

1 small cover, 1 25 

155 90 



SUNDRY MATERIAL, 

300 feet boards, at $26.00 per M. 
1,500 "• plank, '' '' " '' 
13 bbls. cement, at $1.60. 
10 lbs. oakum, 
^ ton coal, 
52 lbs. winding rope, 

4 gallons naphtha, 
50 lbs spikes, 
60 lbs. nails, 
1 J yds. enamelled cloth, 
23 yds. cotton drilling, at .12, 

275 lbs. rivets, at .13, 
15 hydrant valves, 
13 '' caps, 75^ lbs. at .04, 
29 lbs. manilla rope at .145-, 

1 iron bound block, 
3 gate boxes, 
8 hydrant rods, 

5 wrench nuts for hydrants, at .75, 

6 hydrant gaskets, at .75, 

2 bbls. tar, 
27 feet fuse, 
9^ lbs. chain, 
10 lbs. i inch wire, 

7 hydrant screws, 

8 studs for hydrant caps, 

A^nounts carried forward, $181 55 $1,717 83 



$7 80 


39 


00 


20 


80 


1 


00 


1 


50 


6 


24 


1 


40 


2 


00 


2 


40 




90 


2 


76 


35 


75 


12 


00 


3 


02 


4 


20 


1 


25 


9 


00 


9 


00 


3 


75 


4 


50 


10 


00 




10 


1 


00 


1 


00 




70 




48 



148 



Amounts brought forward, 


$181 55 


50 lbs. white lead, 


5 00 


2 1 sheets 2^ sand paper, 


10 



,717 83 



186 65 



Total value of material on hand, $1,904 48 



TOOLS FOR WATER 


WORKS. 


1 lining stand and fixtures, 


$25 00 


1 punching machine, 


250 00 


1 rolling ^' 


200 00 


6 mandrels. 


90 00 


2 mandrel frames, 


10 00 


4 sets rollers for forming pipe. 


45 00 


6 pr. pipe clamps, 


12 GO 


6 pr. pipe rings, 


5 00 


3 rivet sets. 


1 00 


1 wire gauge. 


1 25 


17 cold chisels. 


2 00 


5 small hammers, 


2 75 


3 mallets. 


50 


5 pair snips. 


5 50 


2 bench shears. 


5 00 


8 oil cans. 


4 00 


20 lanterns. 


20 00 


1 tackle and derrick. 


6 00 


1 hand hose. 


1 50 


I hydrant hose. 


1 00 


2 saws, 


1 00 


1 bit-stock and bits. 


1 50 


1 2-foot square. 


75 


1 jack plane, 


75 


1 oil stone. 


50 


7 drills, 66J lbs. at .20 


13 30 


3 spoons, 


1 00 


7 striking hammers. 


12 00 


3 sledge hammers. 


7 00 $725 30 


Amomit carried forward, 


$725 30 



14:9 



Amount brought forward^ 






$725 30 


2 iron bars 


$3 00 




4 frost wedges, 43J- lbs. at .20 


8 


70 




2 sand-screens, 




50 




7 hj'drant wrenches. 


5 


00 




2 flush hydrant wrenches, 


4 


00 




2 hose spanners, 




25 




1 packing-box wrench, 


1 


25 




6 gate wrenches. 


14 


00 




7 mending knives, 


1 


00 




10 pails, 


3 


00 




2 water tubs. 


1 


50 




1 water barrel, 


1 


00 




4 mortar boxes, 


6 


00 




3 hods. 


1 


00 




2 trowels, 


1 


00 




2 tool boxes, 


7 


00 




7 pair rubber mits, 


10 


00 




1 wheelbarrow, 


4 


00 




20 picks, 


25 


00 




17 shovels at .75 


12 


75 




4 kettles, 


2 


50 




1 grindstone. 


4 


00 




2 tape measures. 


1 


00 




1 cutting bench, 


2 


50 




2 rammers, 


1 


00 




1 pair rubber boots. 


3 


00 




1 pipe cradle. 


1 


00 




3 fire furnaces, 


1 


00 




1 pair h3^drant tongs. 




30 




1 branding iron, S. W. W., 




30 




1 tank for turning pipe, 


45 


00 




3 tar barrels, 


2 


50 




1 plough and points. 


5 


00 




1 step-ladder. 


4 


00 


183 05 



Amount carried forward, 



$908 35 



150 



Amount brought forward, $908 35 

1 ratchet and drills for repairs on 

hydrants, 15 00 

caulking irons and 2 joint pins, 1 00 

powder can, 35 

2 punches, 20 

2 horses, 100 00 

3 wagons, 200 00 
1 pung, 40 00 

1 sleigh, 18 00 

4 blankets, 8 00 

2 harnesses, 45 00 

1 buffalo robe, 6 00 

2 surcingles, 1 00 

OFFICE FURNITURE. 

1 desk, 4 chairs, 1 stove, 1 letter 

hook file, 2 inkstands, 1 order 

slate, 1 broom, 20 00 

454 55 



WATER-SERVICE MATERIALS. 



Total, $1,362 90 



31 feet 2 in. galvanized 


pipe, 


at $0 20 


$6 20 


297 '' IJ " unlined pipe, 




12 


35 64 


1,162 '' l-l *' lined to 1 inch. 




14 


162 68 


799J " 1 " ''1 


(( 




12 


95 94 


357|- lbs. lead pipe, 






9 


32 17 


57^ *' solder, 






16 


9 20 


844 " old lead, 




• 


5i 


46 42 


23 " block tin pipe, 






30 


6 90 


15 connecting leads. 








15 00 


12 12 inch clamps, 




2 


25 


27 00 


9 10 " 




2 


25 


20 25 


3 8 '' 




2 


25 


6 75 


7 6'* 




2 


25 


15 75 



Amount carried forward, $479 90 



151 



Amount brought forward , 






$479 90 


20 4 


inch clamps, 


S2 


25 


45 00 


14 3 




4( 


2 


25 


37 50 


2 4 


inch with Ludlow gates, 






10 00 


2 6 




(I (( 






10 00 


72 stop and waste, con. nipples, 


2 


00 


344 00 


93 IJ 


in. 


brass Ts, 




45 


86 85 


36 1 


u 


plugs, 




07 


2 52 


4 1.] 


4b 


union nipples, 




30 


1 20 


2 1 


a 


goose necks. 


1 


00 


2 00 


H 1 


(fc 


a 




50 


5 50 


4^ 


a 


a 




40 


1 60 


3 2 


<. 


R. W. stop and water cocks. 


4 


00 


12 00 


12 li 


(( 


union swivel nipples, 






6 60 


2U 


u 


R. W. stop and waste T handle, 


1 


67 


3 34 


4 1 


a 


a iC a 






6 00 


3| 


a 


stop and waste T handle. 


1 


30 


3 90 


1 1 


4( 


spigot stop and waste, 






2 00 


7| 


u 


n ^( 


1 


00 


7 00 


3J 


a 


U kl 




75 


2 25 


7 1.^ 


b3 


^ 1 in. brass T, 




45 


3 15 


3 1 


U 


stop and waste with nipples, 


1 


90 


5 70 


2 2 


»4 


brass tap nipples, 




50 


1 00 


51] 


u 


li (( 




40 


2 00 


4U 


(4 


u u 




30 


1 20 


6 1 


u 


U (( 




25 


1 50 


6f 


(( 


U ii 




20 


1 20 


3] 


(( 


U i( 




18 


54 


2 1 


(i 


union couplings, 




50 


I 00 


'^l 


(. 


.Ik 




40 


2 00 


2^ 


u 


u 




30 


60 


1 1 


ii 


ground seat R. W., 






50 


5 2 


u 


^ bends hose thread. 




30 


1 50 


2 2 


(C 


globe valves with wheel, 


3 


50 


7 00 


2 2 


u 


gal. Ts, 




65 


1 30 



Amount carried forward, 



$1,099 35 



152 



Amount hrouglit forward^ 



$1,099 35 



11 1 


by 


' J inch, 


12| 


inch Ts, 




1 2 




' cross ^al., 


1 3 




' gal. 


coupling. 


2 21 






e. 


4 2 






i( 


l^ f 






14 


2| 




' gal. 


R. and L. 



1 hose nipple for stand pipe, 
7 f gal. couplings, 
1 2^ in. " elbow. 



1 2 




(C 


(I 


9 ^ 




<; 


(., 


2 2 




C.I 


(( 


6 1^ 


" mal. 


elbows. 


9 \l 




(( 


Cl 


34 1 




u 


(( 


5 1^ 




(.1, 


Ts, 


1 li 




!,(. 


4t 


5 IJ 


by 


1 in 


. mal. Ts, 


32 1 




u 


U (c 


12 1 


by 


5 U 
"8 


kfc Ik 


111 




«( 


" cross, ' ' 


4 1i 




C( 


!,( U 


2 1 




(« 


CC it 


3 1 by 1 


c& 


(( u 


3 2 




(i 


C. I. plugs, 


2 1J 




u 


Cl i( 


9 IJ 




iC 


(C !.<, 


32 1- 




(fc 


C. C( 


16 1 




(k 


4( (I 


2 1 




u 


stopcocks and nipple, 


21 1 




fcl 


solder corporations and 
nipj)le, 



$0 20 


2 20 


16 


1 92 




60 




55 


35 


70 


25 


1 00 


9 


1 44 




20 




1 00 


7 


49 




45 




40 




40 


30 


60 


25 


1 50 


20 


1 80 


18 


6 12 


25 


1 25 




25 


25 


1 25 


20 


6 40 


20 


2 40 




38 


30 


1 20 


25 


50 


25 


75 


15 


45 


12 


24 


10 


90 


5 


1 60 


5 


80 


1 90 


3 80 



1 75 



36 75 



Amount earned forward^ 



SI, 179 64 



153 

Amount brought forward, $1,179 64 

81 1 inch solder connecting nipples, $0 35 28 00 

1 self-closing faucet, 2 80 
4 hose bite faucets, 1 00 4 00 

2 corporations soldered on, 4 50 

2 hose nipples and 1 cap, 75 
38 bushings and reducing couplings, 3 80 

13 in. gal. nipple, 35 

4 2J- '' *' " 35 1 40 

7 2 '' '' '- 30 2 10 

41 ft. small iron pipe, 5 2 05 

33 lead pipe tacks, 1 00 

90 pipe hooks, 40 00 

4 Bartholomew hydrants, 12 00 

5 lbs. red lead, 50 

3 shut-off rods, 35 1 05 
1 service box cover, 20 



Total, • $1,284 14 



INVENTORY OF TOOLS FOR WATER SERVICE. 

4 service wrenches, 

2 pipe cutters and wheels, 

1 2 in. die plate and die, 

11'' '' '' '' 3 dies. 

If" " " " die, 

1 press and cones for lining pipe, 

2 set cones, 
1 bench vise, 
1 1 in. tapping machine, 

1 5 fci a a 

^ 8 

8 pair tongs, 

2 Stilson wrenches, 
4 monkey " 

3 fire pots, 

Amount carried forward^ $140 00 



$3 


00 


12 


00 


15 


00 


9 


00 


8 


00 


40 


00 


10 


00 


8 


00 


15 


00 


12 


50 


3 


00 


2 


50 


2 


00 



154 

Amount brought forward^ 

1 8 in. solder kettle, 

2 solder ladles, 

5 doz. service locks at .65 

3 soldering irons, 

6 flat files, 
2 round files, 

62 clamps for locking service pipe 

1 set washer cutters, 

2 ten pins, 
1 lining bench, 
5 tunnels, 

3 force pumps, 
1 screw driver and saw set. 

Number of services put in, 13 7. 
Average cost of services, $21.33 each. 

NUMBER OF FEET AND SIZE OF SERVICE PIPIO LAID. 

2 in- galvanized 208 ft. 

1 " cement lined, 72 

f" '' '• 4,345 



140 


00 


1 


50 


1 


00 




60 


S2 


50 


3 


25 


1 


25 




20 


37 


70 


1 


50 




40 


1 


50 


1 


00 


10 


00 




60 



$233 00 



Total, 4,625 ft. 

Respectfull}^ 

benjami:n^ almy, 

Superintendent. 



REPOUT 



OF THE 



COMMITTEE ON HIGHWAYS, 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Committee on Highways, Dec. 28, 1876. 
To the City Council of the City of Somerville : 

The Committee on Highways deem it proper to submit to the 
City Council a brief report of their doings during the year now 
about to close. 

Your committee have held sixty-eight meetings, have received 
and acted upon one hundred and sixty-three orders, petitions, etc., 
and have submitted one hundred and fifty-two reports. 

No new streets have been laid out, but much labor has been 
given to the completion of those previously laid out, and the com- 
mittee have the satisfaction of reporting them all finished, and the 
betterments assessed thereon. 

That portion of Beacon Street lying between Sacramento Street 
and Somerville Avenue has been greatly improved by being 
widened to its full width of sixty-six feet, the grade raised from six 
to twenty-two inches through the lower portions, and the whole 
roadway thoroughl}^ macadamized : four thousand seven hundred 
and sixty- three loads of cracked stone having been used, besides a 
large quantit}^ of earth filling, which was mostly obtained from the 
surplus remaining after the construction of the West Somerville 
Sewer. This street is now completed throughout its entire length, 
and in the opinion of your committee is one of the best thorough- 
fares in the city. 

Fourteen street crossings have been constructed, the repaAing 
of Washington Street under the bridge of the Boston and Lowell 
Rrailroad, and a large amount of paving required by the resetting 
of edgestones and gutters, have all been done by the regular high- 
way force and with but little outlay for paving-stones, the Wake- 
field gravel having supplied all the round stone pavers required. 

No gravel has yet been taken from the land in Waltham, as j'our 



158 

committee have not been able to make what thej considered advan- 
tageous terms with the Fitchburg Railroad Company for transpor- 
tation and loading. 

The completion of the Broadway Park, followed by the assess- 
ment of betterments on eight hundred and thirteen estates under 
the direction and guidance of the City Corhicil, has added to the 
labors of your committee. 

But little progress can be reported in the construction of brick 
sidewalks, the amount at the disposal of the committee for this ob- 
ject being less than $1,000. The construction of sewers has fur- 
nished a considerable quantit}^ of earth suitable for grading walks, 
and it has been freely used for this purpose. 

The City Engineer, under the instructions of your committee, has 
numbered twent3"-two streets. The principal ones are, Somerville 
Avenue, Grand View Avenue, Warren Avenue, Mt. Vernon Street, 
Rush Street, Springfield Street, and Pearl Street. About two 
thousand numbers have been put upon houses. 

The committee desire to express their appreciation of the services 
of the Superintendent of Streets, and of the clerk of their commit- 
tee, for the faithful and satisfactory manner in which they have 
performed their respective duties. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JACOB T. GLINES, Chairman. 



TI3:iI=l.ID 



AJ^NUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



CITY ENGINEER OF SOMERVILLE, 

1876. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Mayor axd Aldermen, March 5, 1877. 

Accepted, referred to the Committee on Printing, with instructions to 
print the same in the Annual Report of the City. One hundred copies 
separate to be bound in paper. Sent down for concurrence. 

CHARLES E. OILMAN, Clerk. 



In Common Council, March 7, 1877. 
Concurred in. 

SOLOMON DAVIS, Clerk. 



CITY or SOMERVILLE. 



City Engineer's Office, Jau. 15, 1877. 
To his Honor the Mayor, and the City Council of the City of Somerville : 

Gentlemen, — The City Engineer respectfully presents the 
following report for the 3^ear 1876. 

SEWERS. 

The following tabular statement will show the lengths, sizes, etc., 
of sewers built during the year. 



11 



162 



CO 



M 

M 

p; 

m 

cc 

P^ 
O 

H 

H 
< 
H 

P5 

PQ 
<1 
Eh 





*1 


I- CO 
O CI 


CO 


to 

to 


00 

o 


r-l 
r-l 

r-l 


CO 


to 
to 

00 


to 
to 


CI 

to 


(D 

.2 


-a . 


00 
00 






O C5 


o 


CO 


m 


J^ 


CD 


o 


lO 


CO 












Oi o 


to 


■<* 




CO 


CI 


rH 


CI 


C3 


<•- *^ 


OJ 


O 


^ r-- 




CI 


to 


r-l 


Ttt 








P< 


cr: 


CO 




1-1 




r^ 














0> 




J^ 


u 


(£, O 


CO 


r-l 


-(• 


ci 


03 


CI 


CI 


-+ 




&«i 


n< l- 


CI 


CO 


Cl 


CO 


OS 


CI 


d 


■* 


'Zl 








l-H O 


iH 


00 


■<J* 


r-l 


00 


r-l 


rH 


i-{ 


P- 






c^ 


^ 


















>, 


-- C3 






CJ 
















«o~ 


^to" 




-»3 












>o 




lO 






\a 


ffl 




•ir).i( til 


rj* CO 


r-l 

C5 


to 

CI 


to 


O 


lO 

CO 


r-l 


00 
CI 


to 


'3 


» 


o 




»1)SU0[ 


o t- 


■^ 


-i- 




o> 


•* 


r-l 


r-l 


rH 


P 












I— 1 




■^ 


rH 














/^.^..^^ 


1- 








, 


• 


^ 


, 




, 


, 


» 


, 


• 


• 








o 


o 


c 






^ 


, 




, 


o 


<y o 








> 


^ 
















> 


> > 








c^ _ 


ci 




, 




« 


^ 




f 


a 


rt eS 




























Sm 








o 




bo 




* 




• 


>> 




• 


>> 


CtfJ bfi 








t 




o 




13 










o 


& <u 








>. '^ 


t^ 


>j 


>> 


>. 


.■<J 


.^ 


>. 


>» 


>> >> 








c- 




« 


ct 




rt 


CS 






re 


c3 


c3 n 






































O m 


O 


u 


02 


O 


o 


QQ 


OQ 


O 


(J 


O O 




•jna 


U7 


OD 


CO 


•># 


05 


CI 


lO 


• 


• 


rH 


CI 


00 CI 




55 


00 


to 


t- 


CI 


T-l 


o> 


o 

CO 


. 


: 


fr- 


>o 


t- to 




•8JDIUI 




CO 


iH 
CO 


CO 
Cl 


00 




C5 


rH 


CO 


• 


CO 


■>* T-i 


1— 


o 




























CO 






























•SDIOl(-UGH^ 


(M 


lO 


iH 


"* 


CO 


co 


o 


O 


O 


rH 


• 


' ' 


0-. 
rH 


P 


























































^ 


>Ol(.)iij 


If: 


oo 


or) 


00 


CI 


00 


CO 


CI 


CI 


>o 


CI 


00 "0 






IM .171,- 




<* 


i-H 


-1" 


'^ 


r-l 


-* 


rH 


rH 


rH 




r-l 






























































O 






























u 


















O 






o 


O 

a 






91 
















Oh 




O 


&I 
























^ 


C 




U " 






*C 
















U-i 


^ 


Ph 


Ui 


'd 






































^ 


















c 




c5 










- 


- 


« 


- 


. 


a 


*• 




a 


O 








fS 














O 




<j 


o 


Ch 










. a 




r^ 


• 

c 




C 


• 


• 


• 


bo 


• • 














cS 


ri 




ffS 






c 


• F^ 


s 










• > 




^ 


> 




> 




a 




s 


• c3 






>> 








;-^ 
















bO 






,a 




















c 




• c 






.^j 




3 




3 


3 




3 


o 


o 


3 


^ 


o 






*5 




CO 




crj 


C/J 




Oi 


O 


O 


S 


! ^ 






n 




S 




2 


S 




S 


"o 




CO 


C) 


« 










_C3 






c3 






C3 


CS 


u 

c 
rt 


c3 

c 

<1 








o 


t> 




o 


• 

> 




O 

a 
a 


• 

• 
• 


• 


• 
• 


• 
• 

>> 




o 

» 2 






H 


C 

c 


> 

s 






»4 


3 

cS 


• 

a 




O 


C3 
O 


o 

O 


§ 2 








M 


k; 


1^ 


Q 


^ 


w 


W 


t:^ 


n 


^ 


^ o 




H 






• 


• 


, 


, 


, 


> 


• 
• 


, 


fc< 


• 


, , 




o 


a 

2 

Ph 


1 


o 

c 

o 




'2 

O 


> 


• 
• 
• 

a 


<; 

o 

a 


o 


^ 


OQ 


• 

>> 

c: 


00 

a 








. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


• 


. 


. 


o 






"« 




. 


> 


. 


• 


. 


• 


• 


• 


• 


. 


H r3 










H — 


<1 


• 


• 


• 




• 


• 


o 


O 








o 

i 


c 
c 
> 
< 


c 
o 

• 


o 
o 

c 
o 


-4— 

s 


a 


t3 

G 
c3 


O 
1^ 


.a 
o 


5 

o 
02 


a 

O 
>t 

QQ 


O 







P C OO 



cq 



C3 
>» to 



jo 


f- to 




-s 


Ol 


C U 






e«» 


'-^ i' 




o ^ 




■^ o 




<t J 












c to 




•r c> 



P.r3 



00 

o 



^ -^ 



- ^ 



163 



beaco:n^ and elm streets sewer. 

This is an extension of a sewer built in 1875, commencing at 
point on Beacon Street at its junction with Sacramento Street, 
thence through Beacon Street, under the Fitchburg Raihoad and 
bridge abutments, crossing Somerville Avenue, through Mossland 
and Ehn Streets to Davis Square at West Somerville. From Sacra- 
mento Street to Willow Avenue the sewer is forty- eight inches in 
diameter, and from Willow Avenue to Davis Square is forty-two 
inches in diameter. The contract was awarded to W^illiam Sullivan, 
of Lawrence, and the work commenced on the twenty- ninth day of 
June. The rate of progress made by the contractor was not in ac- 
cordance with the terms of the contract. The contract required the 
work to be completed before December 1, 1876, and at that date 
fourteen hundred and ninety-four feet remained uncompleted, and 
at the close of the jxar five hundred and ninety-five feet remained 
uncompleted. 

A large portion of the territorv through which this sewer was 
constructed is very wet and sandy, and numerous powerful springs 
were encountered, making it necessary to use great care in the con- 
struction. The deepest excavation being thirty-two and eight 
tenths feet, at the junction of Mossland and Elm Streets. 

On August 18, a temporary injunction was issued by the 
Supreme Court, restraining the city from building the sewer under 
the Fitchburg Railroad and bridge abutments. After a slight delay 
the matter was adjusted between the railroad compau}^ and the 
city. 

The construction of this sewer will give an outlet for the drainage 
of a large portion of West Somerville, and by the construction of 
lateral sewers the people in that vicinity will receive the benefit of 
a much-needed improvement. 

NEW CROSS STREET SEWER. 

This sewer was built at the expense of private parties, in accord- 
ance with lines and grades given by the City Engineer. 



164 



SYCAMORE STREET AND BROADWAY SEWER. 

The contract for this sewer was made with Francis Mongan, but 
on account of the unfavorable weather he was allowed to di^on- 
tinue the work for the season. 

SOUTH AND EARLE STREETS SEWER. 

This sewer was commenced in 1875, and finished during the year, 

MAN-HOLES. 

One man-hole has been constructed on the Marshall Street sewer 
near Oakland Avenue for the purpose of examining the sewer ; 
man}^ more are needed on our old sewers, some of which are half 
a mile or more in length without a man-hole. The wooden covers 
should be replaced with iron. 

CATCH-BASINS. 

Thirty-six catch-basins have been constructed during the year at 
a cost of about sixty-five dollars each. Several of the old ones have 
been repaired and many others will need early attention. The 
openings should be made uniform in size, and iron covers substi- 
tuted for the wooden ones now in use. Forty-one old and decaj'ed 
covers have been replaced by new ones. 

The sewers in Avon and Leland Streets and Concord Avenue 
have been built by the cit}^ under the direction of D. A. Sanborn, 
Superintendent of Sewers. 

There are quite a number of sewers of which there is no location, 
nor any record showing the depth ; this often causes anno3'ance, 
especially in making connections. At all points where connections 
have been made with these sewers during the 3'ear, measurements 
have been taken to determine the location and depth. 

The appropriation for sewers was $10,000, and a special appro- 
priation of $35,000 for the Beacon and Elm Streets sewer. The 
amount expended by the Sewer Department, exclusive of the 
Beacon and Elm Streets sewer was $8,078.15, which includes the 
salar}" of the Superintendent, the portion paid by the city for the 



165 

construction of new sewers, the construction of catch-basins, the 
cleaning of sewers and catch-basins and general repairs. The 
Superintendent reports the cost of removing the deposit from 
catch-basins at about fifty-two cents per load, and for removing 
the same from the large sewers at about eightj^-four cents per load. 
$29,943.74 w^as expended in the construction of the Beacon and 
Elm Streets sewer. 

Sewer assessments have been laid as follows, viz. : South and 
Earle Streets $894.62 ; Concord Avenue, from Springfield to Leon 
Streets, 1453.59 ; Avon Street, $705.02 ; Leland Street, $984.28 ; 
and Beech and Pitman Streets, $507.50 ; making a total of 
$3,545.01. 

A sewer was ordered in Chester Street and a contract made with 
Francis Mongan for its construction, but on account of the delay in 
the construction of the Beacon and Elm Streets sewer, with which 
it was to connect, the work was postponed for the season. 

CRAGIE BRIDGE OUTLET. fy 

B}^ an Act of the Legislature, approved Ma}^ 8, 1875, the cities 
of Cambridge and Somerville are required to extend the main sewer 
towards or into the deep water channel of Charles River, the work 
not to be commenced until the plans are approved by the Harbor 
Commissioners, — the extension to be made within two j^ears. 

Acting under instructions from the Committee on Sewers of the 
cities of Cambridge and Somerville, a plan prepared by J. G. 
Chase, City Engineer of Cambridge, contemplating the construction 
of a wooden box attached to the piles of the bridge, was presented 
to the Harbor Commissioners for their approval. This plan was 
objected to b}^ the Harbor Commissioners on account of its inter- 
fering with the free ebb and flow of the tide, and by the Engineer 
for the Bridge Commissioners on account of the additional weight 
that would be brought to bear on the piles. In June a plan made 
by Wm. S. Barbour, City Engineer of Cambridge (successor to 
Mr. Chase), in which it is proposed to extend the sewer by^ laying 
six wrought-iron enamelled pipes, fourteen inches in diameter, 
below low water, was approved by the Harbor Commissioners, but 
the construction was deferred until another 3'ear. 



166 



PEIYATE DEAIKS. 

The new city ordinance in relation to sewers and drains requires 
that all connections of private drains with common sewers be made 
by persons licensed in writing by the Mayor and Aldermen, and be- 
fore performing any work to give satisfactory bonds for its faithful 
performance. In May, the Maj'or and Aldermen adopted certain 
'^ Rules in relation to Private Drains." {See Appendix.) 

The owner or agent of the premises to be drained is required 
to make an application to the Cit}' Engineer in writing ; the permit 
is then issued to a licensed drain-layer, who performs the work and 
makes a return of the same to this office. The adoption of this 
sj^stem has secured a better class of work ; still there is room for 
improvement. 

The work of laying private drains should be carefully inspected ; 
the experience of our city in the past has been such as to teach us 
that too much care cannot be exercised in this branch of our drain- 
age. In building the Beacon and Elm Streets sewer through 
Mossland Street, a portion of an old sewer fifteen inches in diam- 
eter was taken up, and at a connection of a private drain with the 
sewer the drain pipe was found to project nearly half-way across 
the sewer, thus reducing the capacit}' of the sewer about one fourth. 
Many other samples of poor workmanship have been found, which, 
if not discovered, would probably cause serious damage. 

ye:ntilation of house draiks. 

Several complaints have been made at this office that the sewer 
gases entered the dwelling-houses. On investigation the trouble was 
found to be on account of a defect, or a lack of ventilation of the 
house drain. The soil pipes should be carried through the roof, 
and a proper ventilator attached, or the soil pipe should be con- 
nected with the flue of a chimney ; water-closets should be ventilated 
from the space under the seat ; the rain-water conductors from the 
roofs should connect with the drains, except when located at such 
points that the prevaihng direction of the wind would be liable to 
convey the gases through an open window into the rooms of the 



167 



house, wliich frequently occurs in French-roofed houses. Wherever 
these arrangements have been appUcd, the trouble from sewer gases 
has been enth-elj' removed. 

Particular attention should be paid to the proper ventilation of 
house drains, for the most dangerous gases are not perceptible to 
the smell, and without warning the occupants quietly' breathe these 
poisons. 

Thirteen persons have been licensed bj the Ma3'or and Alder- 
men as drain-la3^ers. 

One hundred and twelve permits for la3'ing private drains have 
been issued during the 3'ear, and the location recorded in a book 
for the purpose, as required hy the city ordinance. 



HIGHWAYS. 

No new streets have been laid out during the year, but several 
streets previously laid out have been finished. The following state- 
ment will show the principal street improvements : — 



STREET IMPROYEMEXTS IN 187G. 



Name. 


Fko-ai 


To 


IlOW I.MPUOVKD. 


111 f C't. 


Tiftacon 


Kent 


Somerville Av. 
Boston Line . . 
Mystic Avenue 

Leon 

Oliver , . . c . . . . 
Somerville Av 
Elm 


Macadamized .... 
Remacadamized . 
Macadamized .... 

Macadamized 

Macadamized 

Macadamized 

Macadamized 

Gravelled 

Macadamized .... 


*> 4*^5 


Broadway 

Chauncey Av'nue 
Concord Avenue. 
Glen 


Cutter 

Broadway .... 
Springfield .... 
Flint 


1,G00 

1,325 

515 

190 


Linwood 

Mossland ...... 


Washington . . . 
Somerville Av. . 
Cambridge line 
Broadway 


2,050 
380 


Somerville Av . . 


Elm 


9,G.jO 


Winthrop Av'nue 


M3'stic Avenue 


1,225 


Total 








19,3G0 











168 



The following statement shows the assessments laid on estates 
benefited by the laying out and grading of the respectiA'e streets : — 

HIGHWAY BETTERMENT ASSESSMENTS LAID IN 1876. 



Street. 


From 


To 


Approx. 
length 
in feet. 


Assessment. 


Chauncey Av'nue 
Concord Avenue 


Broadway 

Prospect 

Springfield 

Flint 


Mystic Avenue . . 

Springfield 

Leon 


1,325 
1,010 
515 
190 
630 
790 
1,225 


$6,507.12 

2,010.07 

380 28 


Glen 


Oliver 


102 00 


Newton 

Springfield 

Winthrop Av'nue 


Webster Avenue 
Concord Avenue 
Broadway 


Concord Avenue 
Cambridge Line 
Mystic Avenue . . 


685.33 

974.30 

5,347.50 


Totals 






5,685 


$16,006.60 









STEEET LINES. 

In 1861, immediately after the Richardson surve^^ stone bounds 
were set in all the accepted streets of the town. Most of these 
were set in the centre of the street. In the construction of sewers, 
laying water pipes, and changes in grade, many have been removed ; 
and nearly all the new streets laid out since 1861 are without anj^ 
permanent bounds or reference marks. When the streets were laid 
out or constructed, bounds might easily have been set, and at a 
slight additional expense ; but in mau}^ streets it is now necessary 
to make a resurvey of the street, and even then it is oftentimes 
impossible to run the line shown on the plan of the lajdng out, on 
account of the incompleteness of many of the plans, as shown by 
the absence of any connection of the lines on the plan with per- 
manent structures or marks on the ground. 

The labor and expense of establishing these lines are great, but it 
is quite important that the matter should receive early attention, 
for the data for re-establishing the old street lines are each year 
growing less. 



169 

During the year lines have been re-established on twelve streets, 
and properly recorded ; eighteen new stone bounds have been set 
and points have been established ready for setting twenty-four more. 
Four old bounds have been repaired and properlj' adjusted to line 
and grade. Street lines for setting fences have been furnished to 
eleven abutters. 

BRIDGES. 

In July, 1875, the Mayor and Aldermen petitioned the County 
Commissioners that the bridges over the Boston and Lowell Rail- 
road on School, Medford, Cross, and Walnut Streets, and the Low- 
ell Railroad bridge over Washington Street, might be rebuilt at the 
proper width and such changes made in the structures as to render 
the street safe for public travel. Several hearings were given in 
1875, and in November, 1876, the County Commissioners, in com- 
pau}' with several members of the City Council, visited the several 
bridges, but thus far no decision has been given b}' the County 
Commissioners. 

During the j^ear, the Boston and Lowell Railroad Company con- 
structed a sidewalk on Washington Street under their railroad, and 
repaired and enlarged the drain near the bridge. 

Nearl}' all the railroad bridges in the city are unsightly, awkward 
structures, and the safet}^ of many of them for public travel might 
be questioned. It is recommended that each bridge be carefully 
examined semiannually, and the result reported in writing to the 
City Council. 

CENTRAL HILL PARK. 

In January, the City Council passed the following : — 
" Ordered, that the City Engineer be directed to draft and submit 
a plan for the lading out and grading of the public grounds owned 
b}" the city and situated on Highland Avenue." 

The survey of the grounds was commenced as soon as the weather 
would permit, but on account of the pressure of other work was 
aot completed until November. In May, the City Council passed 
the following: " Ordered, that the Committee on Public Property 
be and they are hereby authorized and instructed to finish the grad- 
ing of the area included between Highland Avenue and the circu- 



170 

lar driveway in front of the High School building, and properly sod 
the same ; also to set a curbing stone of granite similar to that 
about the City Hall, along the line of Highland Avenue ; also to 
set out a suitable number of trees on said area, the expense of the 
same to be charged to Miscellaneous Account." Acting under the 
above order, the Committee on Public Property instructed the City 
Engineer to submit a plan and estimates for the improvements in 
front of the High School building, the same to be a part of the 
general plan for the improvement of the entire area. The plans 
submitted were approved b}' the committee, and proposed the con- 
struction of a substantial driveway, twenty feet in width with 
paved gutters on either side provided with catch-basins and drains 
to remove the surface water, the setting of a granite curb on High- 
land Avenue in front of the High School building, setting granite 
steps at the central entrance, and constructing a brick walk twelve 
feet in width with granite edges, from Highland Avenue to the 
High School building. The cost of the improvement was as follows : 

John Turner & Co. furnishing and setting 208y*j ft. 

of curbing, 4 steps, 5 posts, 
Martin Gill, drivewaj^, catch-basins, and drains, 
J. W. Kidney, 177y% linealfeetof edgestone at $1.48, 
" 141 x*j square yards of brick paving at 

$1.00, 
" two small granite posts at $6.00, 

'' building wall under steps, 

Francis Mongan, grading and sodding lawn 17,627 sq. 

ft. at $.02J-, 
Francis Mongan, 4-/^ cords of manure at $7.00, 
'' spading in manure, 

" grading between driveway and church, 

Hugh Carne}^, 30 trees and setting the same at $3.50, 
Somerville Water Works, pipes and connections for 
hydrant on lawn, 

Less amount received for centennial trees, 
Total, 



$653 00 


757 


72 


262 


55 


141 


40 


12 


00 


15 


00 


381 


92 


32 


90 


30 


00 


35 


00 


105 


00 


14 


55 


$2,441 


04 


31 


50 


$2,409 


54 



171 

Under the instructions received in January two plans were pre- 
sented to the City Council, Dec. 18, 1876, for the la3ing out and 
improving the Park. Plan No. 1 contemplated laying out the 
grounds by the construction of walks ; and Plan No. 2, the laying 
out of the same by the construction of walks and driveways, — both 
plans make provision for the erection of a Memorial Building or 
Soldiers' Monument, between the High School building and the 
Engine House. The plans were referred to the next City Gov- 
ernment. 

On account of the grade of the High School building and of the 
several streets adjoining the Park, it is a matter of considerable 
difficulty to establish a satisfactory grade. The grade proposed on 
the plans presented would lower the summit of the hill from the 
Engine House to the Flag-staff to an elevation three feet above the 
sidewalk on Highland Avenue, and from the Flag-staff gradually 
rising to the present grade at the High School building, thence 
gradually MHng to School Street in the rear of the City Hall. No 
material change is proposed on the slopes near Medford Street and 
the Lowell Railroad. The proposed grade would destroj^ the 
remains of the old earthworks referred to b}^ my predecessor in his 
raport for the year 1875. An attempt to preserve these indistinct 
remains would prevent the establishing of satisfactory grades and 
would mar the general appearance of the Park. A suitable tablet 
can be erected to mark the position of the earthworks. 

BROADWAY PARK. 

This Park was completed in July. The work for the year con- 
sisted in the construction of an iron fence, grading the entire area, 
laying out and constructing walks, setting out shade trees, etc. 

Under authorit}" of the Acts of Legislature, Chap. 97, for the 
3'ear 1874, betterments were assessed on the real estates in the 
vicinit}^, the betterments extending about 3,100 feet from the 
Park in an easterly and westerlj" direction, and about 1,000 feet in 
a northerly and southerly direction. The adjudged betterment per 
foot was from ^ of a cent to 2^ cents per foot on the land fronting 
the Park, thence gradually diminishing to I of a cent on the estates 



172 

situated on the outside limits of the assessments. Eight hundred 
and thirteen estates were assessed, amounting to $46,932.90. 
Tlie assessment was 40 per cent of the adjudged benefit. 

WATER WORKS. 

Street lines and grades have occasionally been furnished to the 
Superintendent of Water Works for the lading of pipes and setting 
hydrants. The water pipes laid and gates and hydrants set for 
the last few years have been marked on the large water-maps. A 
new map, showing in detail the location of the mains and service 
pipes is needed ; those now in use in many respects are not re- 
liable. 

PERAMBULATION OF CITY LINES. 

The lines between Boston and Somerville were perambulated by 
a committee from the Board of Aldermen, the acting Cit}^ Clerk 
and the City Engineer, in connection with a similar delegation 
from the city of Boston. The bounds were put in proper con- 
dition and properly marked. That portion of the line southerly of 
Washington Street should be carefully surveyed and proper ref- 
erence marks established, as the line follows a succession of creeks 
which will be entirel}" obliterated, if the low lands in this vicinity 
are filled, as now proposed. 

GENERAL SURVEY OF THE CITY. 

A careful survey of the city is much needed, and with this in 
view, in making the surveys during the last year, base lines have 
been run and measured for the purpose of making an accurate map 
of the city at some future time ; the large number of new streets 
laid out, and the man}" changes made in the old streets, renders the 
maps of the city now in use of little value. 

STREET NUMBERING. 

Twenty-two streets have been numbered, and owners of houses 
notified ; plans have been made of each street, on which the num- 
bers are properly recorded ; surveys have been completed for man}^ 
other streets, and the plans will be made up during the winter. 



173 



ENGINEERING EXPENSES. 

Salar}^ of C% Engineer, $2,100 00 

Assistants, 1,549 55 

Appropriation for team, 200 00 

Drawing instruments, stationery, stakes, tools, postage, etc., 224 57 



Total, 

The expense for assistants was used as follows : — 
Beacon and Elm Streets sewer, surve3^s and inspection. 
Sewers, except the Beacon and Elm Streets sewer. 
Highways, 

Broadwa}^ Park, surveys and inspection, 
Street numbering. 
Central Hill Park, 
Miscellaneous, • 

Total, 



By which it will be seen that the above includes several items 
not heretofore charged to this department. In previous reports, 
the inspection of the construction of the Beacon and Elm Streets 
sewer and Broadway Park would have been charged to other appro- 
priations. 

This, my first annual report, is respectfully submitted. 

GEORGE A. KIMBALL, 

City Engineer. 



$4,074 


12 


$523 


78 


94 


66 


113 


03 


358 


05 


130 


38 


162 


26 


167 


39 


$1,549 


55 



APPENDIX. 



RULES IN RELATION TO PRIVATE DRAINS. 

^Adopted by the Mayor and Aldermen, May 22, 1876.] 

Persons applying for license shall make an application to the Board of Mayor 
and Aldermen in writing, stating their business and giving names of bondsmen. 
None but faithful, skilful, and experienced men shall be intrusted with any part 
of the work. 

Drain-layers must make full written returns of the ordinary and special uses 
for Avhich the drains are designed, whether of new ^'ork, or alterations, or addi- 
tions, with a full description of all apparatus and arrangements and conditions of 
the common sewer in every case. The return to be made to the City Engineer by 
the drain-layer who obtained the permit, within forty-eight hours after attachment 
with the sewer, or completion of alterations or additions. 

Violations of rules and regulations, or the conditions under which the license is 
taken, will subject the drain-layer to forfeiture of his license as well as to the pains 
and penalties of his bond. 

The Cit3^ Engineer shall be the judge as to whether these conditions have in any 
case been fulfilled. 

Application for permit to connect with any sewer which has been constructed, 
or which is in process of construction, must be made in writing to the City Engi- 
neer by the owners of the property to be drained, or their duly authorized agents, 
and must be accompanied by a clear description of the premises to be drained, and 
of drains required, and also certain agreements, all as provided in the printed form 
issued by the City Engineer. 

At least twenty-four hours' notice must be given at the office of the City Engi- 
neer before any street or public way can be opened for the purpose of laying a 
private drain. 

No pipe can be extended from work previously done and accepted, or new con- 
nection of any kind be made with such work, unless previous notice of at least 
twenty-four hours be given to the City Engineer. 

No work of laying drains can be commenced or continued unless the permit is 
on the grounds in the hands of the drain-layer or some one employed by him, and 
the same must be shown to a police officer or any other officer of the city, if they 
shall so request. 

In opening any street or public way, all materials for paving or ballasting must 
be removed with the least possible injury or loss of the same, and, together with 
the excavated materials from the trenches, must be placed where they will cause 
the least practicable inconvenience to the public. As little as possible of the 
trench must be dug until the junction piece or inlet is found 

No pipes or materials to be used until inspected by the City Engineer or his 
assistants or the Superintendent of Sewers. 

The least indication, unless by special permit, that can be allowed for water- 
closet, kitchen or other drains, not over five inches in diameter, liable to receive 
solid substances, is one inch in five feet, and for cellar and other drains to receive 
water only, one inch in ten feet. All drains to be laid with a uniform grade. 

All pipes that receive surface drainage, or drain hotels, eating-houses, meat- 
packing houses, slaughter-houses, lard or grease rendering establishments, and 
other manufactories or privy vaults, must be supplied with an intervening catch- 
basin or grease-trap, of such dimensions and pattern as the City Engineer shall 
direct. 

Back filling in trench is to be puddled, or, if water cannot be obtained, the 
filling must be thoroughly and compactly rammed. 

No exhaust from steam-engines shall be connected with a public or private 
drain, nor any blow-off from steam-boilers shall be connected without a special 
permit in writing. 

In case a water or gas pipe, or a drain in actual use should come in the way, the 
question of removing or disturbing, or passing over or under said obstruction shall 
be decided by the City Engineer. 

When any change is made in the direction of the pipe, either vertical or hori- 
zontal, curves must be used. 

All persons are required to place an effectual trap in the line of drain just before 
it leaves the premises. 

It is recommended, in order to secure good ventilation of the drains, that the 
owner of the premises make an open connection with a down spout, or an open 
connection with the highest part of the soil pipe, within the premises, through a 
large pipe or flue to a point above the building. 



ANNUAL KEPORT 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRAET 



OF THE 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE, 



FOR THE 



YEAR 1876. 



CITY OP SOMERVILLE. 



In Boaud of Aldermen, March 5, 1877. 

Received, accepted, and referred to the roramittee on Printing, with 
instructions to print tlie same in the annual report of the City, also have 
three hundred copies printed separate, and sent down for concurrence. 

CHARLES E. GILMAN, Clerk. 



In Common Council, March 7, 1877. 
Concurred in. 

SOLOMON DAVIS, Clerk 



THE FEEB PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT. 

Gentlemen of the City Council : — We herewith submit to 
3'ou our Fourth Annual Report as Trustees of the PubUc Library. 

It has been our desire in the year that is past to administer the 
important trust confided to us in the strictest conformity to the 
prevaihng poHcy of municipal retrenchment. Influenced by this 
purpose, we early agreed to withhold the usual petition for a special 
appropriation. This action has of course precluded a large acces- 
sion to the Librarj' ; still, we are permitted to report a steady 
and substantial growth. We haYC been able, not only to meet an 
active demand for the publications of the day, but also to add con- 
siderably to the general resources of the Library. 

On the part of the community, we have witnessed, we are pleased 
to say, a marked development of interest as regards the Library, 
and a much more active participation in its privileges. During the 
year over 46,800 books have been given out, — an increase of nearly 
8,000 volumes over the preceding year. As many as 1,190 have 
been given out in one week, and 385 in a single day. When it is 
remembered that we have only 5,752 volumes all told, it must be 
evident enough that the Library meets an actual want in the com- 
munity. Nearly 1,100 new names have been added to the list of 
borrowers within the year. For the last quarter, over 100 names 
have been added each month. Sometimes, as the Librarian reports, 
as many as a dozen cards have been in waiting for the same book ; 
and not infrequently postal cards are left that the borrower may be 
promptly notified of the presence of a particular book. 

Such facts as these give unmistakable indication that the Libraiy 
12 



178 

has already become the centre of no little intellectual activity and 
wholesome impulse. Henceforth it must be recognized — so it 
seems to us — as one of the most available and inexpensive of the 
educational forces at your command. It is certainly entitled to 
stand side by side with our common schools as bulwarks of sobriety 
and order. We heartily congratulate you on the assured success of 
the experiment you so wisely instituted in the interests of enlight- 
enment and good citizenship. 

The Reading-Table, established as an adjunct to the Library in 
the hope that it would prove the nucleus of a well-furnished read- 
ing-room, has been steadily patronized. It has been supplied 
during the year with some twenty publications, — about the extent 
of its capacity ; and it has proved so attractive and useful, not- 
withstanding the inconveniences of the place, that we now feel a 
lively regret that we are unable to afford better facilities in this 
direction. 

At the beginning of the 3^ear, Miss H. A. Adams was unanimously 
re-elected Librarian. To her zeal and vigilant supervision we are 
greatly indebted for the successful operation of the Library. With 
the exception of two inexpensive books, no loss has been incurred 
beyond the ordinary wear and tear. The Library has been open to 
the public 306 days, — i. e., on all days excepting Sundays and 
holidays. 

The financial statement is as follows : 

Credit balance from 1875, $1,230.93 

Amount of dog- license money 



from the county. 


1,260.29 




Received for Catalogues and fines, 


216.46 


$2,707.68 


Expenses for 1876 : 




For purchase of books, 


$876.83 




" salaries. 


1,062.85 




" incidentals. 


316.70 


2,256.38 






Balance to new account. 




$451.30 



179 

In view of the stringenc}^ of the times, we contemplate this 
showing with some degree of satisfaction ; but, we are willing to 
confess, it is nojj altogether without misgiving. We fully recognize 
the present need of wise economy in the expenditures of the cit^- 
government. But, when we consider the intimate connection of 
the Librar}' to the most vital interests of the cit}^ ; when we 
remember that it must afford to a large majorit}^ of those who 
leave our public schools whatever facilities of higher education they 
are to enjoy ; when we reflect that to many it must be both school 
and college ; that it must be, in many instances, the chief awakener 
of intellectual life, and the almost exclusive dispenser of light and 
refinement ; when, watching its silent workings, we behold its 
streams of influence issuing forth upon the community, and return- 
ing so certainly, though often through indirect and vicarious chan- 
nels, in multiplied and substantial benefits to the tax-paj^er, — we 
are profoundly impressed with the conviction that it is quite possible 
to be too stringentl}' economical in the management of an institu- 
tion like this ; that such economy might easily pro ve both short- 
sighted and expensive ; that niggardliness here might turn out 
to be prodigality itself. 

We would therefore deprecate an over-thriftiness in the manage- 
ment of the Librar}^ as especially unwise ; and we take this occasion 
to earnestly bespeak for it — what you have never, it is believed, 
been disposed to withhold — a liberal and far-sighted policy. 

Respectfull}" submitted. 

W. G. TOUSEY. 
QUINCY A. yiNAL. 
WILLIAM YEAZIE. 
THOMAS J. BUEEUM. 
EDWIK S. CONANT. 
ROSWELL C. DOWNER. 
ALBERT M. ROBINSON. 
T. II. RAYMOND. 
HENRY H. BARBER. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



OF THE 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE, 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 



In Board of Aldermen, Eeb. 26, 1877. 

Keport accepted, referred to the Committee ou Printing with instructions 
to print the same in the Annual Eeport of the City, and sent down for 
concurrence. 

CHARLES E. GILMAN, Clerk. 



In Common Council, Feb. 28, 1877. 
Concurred in. 

SOLOMON DAVIS, Clerk. 



EEPOKT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF OYBRSEERS OF THE POOR, 



FOR THE 



Year ending Dec. 31, 1876. 



To His Honor the Ifafjor, and to the City Council : 

Gentlemen, — During the past year there has been an increased 
demand for aid from all classes of the poor. 

The man who had never asked assistance before, and who, 
could he have found employment, would a thousand times rather 
have earned sujfficient for the support of himself and familj-, has 
in some instances been compelled, as a last resort, to solicit aid 
from the Overseers of the Poor. 

The widow, who in prosperous times would contrive by hard 
work and frugalit}^ to support herself and children during the 
greater part of the year, has been necessitated, more than ever 
before, to lean upon the charities of the city ; and many others, 
who in prosperous times asked aid only in cases of sickness or 
during the winter months, have been constant recipients of public 
charity. 

The number of insane persons haVing settlements in our cit}^, 
and for whom the city is called upon to bear the expense of their 
treatment and support at the State insane hospitals, has been 
greater during the past than any preceding year. The cause of 
this increase is obvious. The law regulating the matter of com- 
pensation at the State hospitals gives the State authorities the 
choice of collecting their bills, either of the place where the 
patient has a settlement or of the patient's responsible relatives. 



184 

During the past 3^ear the city has been required to pay bills, where 
the relatives were quite able and apparently willing to bear the 
expense. 

By a law enacted during the past 3'ear, the city is required to 
oear the expenses of\ such inmates of the State reform schools as 
have settlements in our city. Thus an additional expense has been 
placed upon us, as there are a number of bo3'S in the reform schools 
whose legal settlement is in our cit3\ 

The number of poor who have been provided for at the Charles- 
town Almshouse has not been greatly increased. 

The number of the poor who have received temporary aid, and 
who have settlements in our city or in other cities or towns in the 
Commonwealth, has been considerably increased. 

This has been mainl}" caused by the application of the settle- 
ment law of 1874, which gives a settlement to any man who, 
having no previous settlement, resides in a place five 3^ears and 
pa^'s three taxes during that time, and to any woman who resides 
in a place five 3'ears without having received aid from the Over- 
seers of the Poor during that time. 

The system of providing for the poor is the same, with a few 
slight modifications, as it was when the population of our city was 
not more than one-tenth part of what it is at the present time. 

There are many changes which we have deemed necessary and 
have suggested in previous reports and communications to the 
City Council ; but as these changes have not been carried into 
effect by the favorable action of that body we would again briefly 
call your attention to them. 

We would suggest that an almshouse be erected, either within 
the limits of our cit}^ or elsewhere, for the accommodation of such 
homeless poor as are now provided for at the Charlestown Alms- 
house ; and there should be in connection with this building hos- 
pital accommodations for the sick poor. 

*We believe that the cit}^ should have control of, at least, one 
burial-ground to be used for the accommodation of the poor, and 
of others who are not otherwise provided for. 

The law of the Commonwealth requires every cit}^ or town to be 
provided with at least one burial-ground. 



185 

Being confident that the expenses to the city would be consider- 
ably diminished, and the wants of the poor equally well provided 
f(;r, if the groceries and provisions given to the poor were pur- 
chased and dispensed to the poor by an agent appointed by, and 
under the control of the Overseers of the Poor, we would suggest 
that arrangements be made to carry such a plan into effect. 

We believe that measures should be adopted whereby the large 
number of tramps that are fed and lodged at the expense of the 
city should be compelled to give sufficient labor to reimburse the 
cit}', partially at least, for expenses incurred on their account. 
We have been unable thus far to carry into effect the law of the 
State giving the Overseers of the Poor the power to require work 
of this class of persons. 

You will find appended tables of expenses and receipts, also 
tables of the number in the different classes assisted by us during 
the year, to which we would respectfully call your attention. 

a:n'sel lewis, 
thomas cunningham, 
hokace chapin, 

Overseers of the Poor. 



EXPENSES FOR THE YEAR ENDING DEC. 31, 1876. 
House rents, $616 00 
Groceries and provisions, 12,342 96 
Fuel, 4,500 48 
Boots and shoes, 1,076 86 
Dry goods, 131 89 
Clothing, 49 00 
Furniture, 12 30 
Aid to paupers having settlements elsewhere, 1,550 93 
Board and nursing of paupers in private families, 573 86 
Board and nursing of paupers in Massachusetts Gen- 
eral Hospital, 65 00 
Board and nursing of paupers in insane asylums, 803 88 

Amount carried forward, $21,723 16 



186 

Amount brought forward^ $21,723 16 

Board and nursing of paupers in Charlestown Alms- 
house, 866 39 

Board and nursing of paupers in Reform School and 
Houses of Correction, 

Medical examination of insane. 

Burial of paupers, 

Food for tramps and lodgers. 

Transportation of paupers to State Almshouse and 
other places, 

Books, stationery, postage stamps, 

Salaries of overseers, 

Miscellaneous, 



62 


67 


15 


00 


675 


75 


260 


75 


108 


38 


88 


95 


1,100 


00 


56 


00 


$24,857 05 


$120 85 


425 


89 


3,420 


39 



RECEIPTS. 

For support of paupers at Charlestown Almshouse, 

From State treasurer. 

From other cities and towns. 

For cash paid for support of persons at lunatic hos- 
pitals, 67 09 

For cash paid for support of bo^^s at State Reform 
School, 

For cash received from lodge laborers, 



Net expenses of the year, 

Number of families assisted, 

Number of above whose settlements were in other 
cities or towns. 

Number of families assisted by other cities and towns 
whose settlements are in our cit}^. 

Number of persons supported in Charlestown Alms- 
house, 



39 42 


3,161 20 


$7,234 84 


$17,622 21 


562 


85 


32 



187 

Number in insane as3^1ums, 9 
*' State Reform Schools, 3 
" Work-house, 2 
Number boarded in families, 6 
" Massachusetts General Hospital, 1 
Number of tramps accommodated at the police sta- 
tion, 1,936 
Number of persons sent to State Almshouse, 10 
'' families sent out of State, 4 



CITY CLERK'S REPORT. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 



STATISTICS OF BIRTHS, MAEEIAGES, AND DEATHS 

IN 1876. 

The statistics of births, marriages, and deaths in the city of 
Someryille, for the year 1876, are as follows : — 

MARRIAGES. 

Number of intentions issued in 1876, 163 

Less than last year, 2 

Number of marriages registered, 145 

NATIONALITY OF THOSE REGISTERED. 

Born in the United States, 100 

Both parties foreign, . 32 

American groom and foreign bride, 4 

Foreign groom and American bride, 7 

Unknown, • 2 

^_ 145 



First marriage, , 248 

Second marriage, 36 

Third marriage, 2 

Unknown, 4 



290 



Oldest person married, 64 

Youngest person married, 17 



192 



BIRTHS. 



Number of births in 1876, 
Less than last 3'ear, 
Number of males, 
Number of females, 



315 

321 



636 

97 



636 



Born of American parents. 
Born of foreign parents, 
American male and foreign female, 
Foreign male and American female. 
Unknown, 



248 

240 

31 

60 

57 



636 



There were seven pairs of twins. 



DEATHS IN YEAR 1876. 



Whole number of deaths registered in 1876, 



Less than last year. 





Ages 








Under 10 years 


» 


229 


Between 10 


and 20, 


20 


u 


20 




30, 


36 


(( 


30 




40, 


41 


a 


40 




50,; 


23 


u 


50 




60, 


32 


u 


60 




70, 


24 


t,; 


70 




80, 


23 


(( 


80 




90, 


11 


(( 


90 




100, 


5 



n 1876, 




444 
56 


Males. 


Females, 


Total. 


113 


116 


229 


12 


8 


20 


11 


25 


36 


15 


26 


41 


13 


10 


23 


15 


17 


32 


13 


11 


24 


4 


19 


23 


4 


7 


11 


2 


3 


5 



444 



Oldest person deceased, 95 j^ears, 5 months, and 8 days. 



193 



NATIONALITY. 



Born in Somerville, 190 

Born in other places in United States, 162 

Of foreign birth, 90 

Unknown, 2 



444 



CHARLES E. GILMAN, 

City Cleric. 



18 



ORDINANCES ORDAINED IN 1876. 



CITY OF SOMERVILLE. 

In the Year One Thousand Eight Hundred and Seventy-six. 



OKDIJS'ANCE KO. 28. 

AN ORDINANCE IN RELATION TO SINKING FUNDS. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of Somerville, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be a Board of Commissioners of the 
vSinking Funds of the city, elected for the purposes, and in accord- 
ance with the provisions set forth in Chapter 209 of the Acts of 
1875. 

Sect. 2. The City Council for the year 1876 shall, as soon as 
n)a3' be convenient, elect by concurrent vote three persons to act 
as a Board of Commissioners, one for three j^ears, one for two 
3'ears, and one fur one year ; and thereafter the City Council shall 
annually, as soon after their organization as may be convenient, 
elect in the same manner one person who shall hold his office for 
the term of three years next ensuing, or until another shall be 
elected in his stead. Vacancies occurring in the Board shall be 
filled b}' concurrent vote of the City Council at any time ; the 
member or members so elected to hold office only for the unex- 
pired term of the member or members who have ceased to hold 
office, and in case of such vacancy or vacancies the remaining 
member or members shall exercise the powers of the Board till 
such vacancj' or vacancies shall be filled. 

Sect. 3. The Commissioners shall choose a Treasurer and 
Secretaiy, who ma}^ be the Cit}' Treasurer ; and if the City Treas- 
urer shall be chosen, his bond shall apply to and include duties 



198 

performed under this ordinance. If any other person shall be 
•chosen as Treasurer, he shall give a bond, with sureties, to the 
satisfaction of the Commissioners, for the proper discharge of the 
duties of his office. 

Sect. 4. The Commissioners shall receive all sums contributed 
to a Sinking Fund and invest and reinvest the same and the 
income thereof as it shall accrue, in the name of the Board, in 
the particular scrip, notes, or bonds for the redemption of which 
such Sinking Fund was established, or in other bonds of said city, 
which are secured by Sinking Funds, or in the securities in which 
by law the funds of savings banks may be invested, except per- 
sonal securities, although guaranteed b}^ sureties ; but no portion 
of the same shall be loaned to the city except in the manner pro- 
vided in said Chapter 209 of the Acts of 1875 ; and the Commis- 
sioners ma}' sell and reinvest such securities when required in their 
judgment for the good management of the fund. 

Sect. 5, All loans for constructing the Water Works of the 
city shall be negotiated for a period not exceeding thirty j-ears. 
All loans for constructing sewers of the city shall be negotiated 
for a period not exceeding twenty years, and all other loans for a 
period not exceeding ten years ; provided^ however^ that necessary 
renewals for the payment of the debt of the cit}', existing June 13, 
1875, shall be made payable, so much thereof as relates to the 
water loan, on or before the first da}' of April, 1905, and all other 
loans then existing on or before the first day of April, 1895. Bonds 
issued for such loans shall bear upon the face the purpose for which 
the}^ were issued, and shall be made pa3'able the first day of either 
January, April, Jul}^, or October of the years in which they may 
respectively mature. 

Sect. 6. The Commissioners shall annuall}^ in the month of 
January, submit to the City Council the amounts required to be 
raised b}^ taxation for the several Sinking Funds, which amounts 
shall be put into the annual order laying a specific tax for that 
year. 



199 

Sect. 7. When a debt to be paid from a Sinking Fund shall 
become due, the Board shall furnish the City Treasurer, from the 
funds in its care for such pa3'ment, the sum required, or so much 
as maj' be to the credit of such debt, taking his receipt therefor. 

Sect. 8. The Commissioners shall keep a record of their pro- 
ceedings, and shall annually, in the month of January, make a 
written report to the City Council of the amount and condition of 
said funds and the income thereof for the then preceding financial 
year. 

Sect. 9. The Treasurer of said Board of Commissioners shall 
keep such book or books as will exhibit the actual condition of 
each particular fund, giving the amount contributed, with accumu- 
lation thereto and the time at which the same will be required for 
purposes of redemption. 

Sect. 10. The necessary expenses of said Board of Commis- 
sioners shall be paid by the city, and the Treasurer and Secretary 
thereof shall receive such compensation as shall be fixed by the 
City Council, but no Commissioner shall receive compensation for 
his services. 

Sect. 11. This ordinance shall take eff"ect upon its passage. 



CITY OF • SOMERVILLE. 



Be it ordained hy the City Council of the City of Somerville as follows: 

OEDIKANCE NO. 29. 

AN" ORDINANCE RELATING TO THE OFFICE, AND PRESCRIBIN'G THE 
DUTIES OF THE CITY AUDITOR. 

Section 1. It shall be the duty of the Auditor to receive all 
accounts and claims against the city, after the same shall have 



200 

been certified as provided in City Ordinance No. 4, Section 2. 
He shall carefully examine all such accounts and claims, and see 
that they are all correctly cast, and having certified to the same 
and entered them on his book kept for that purpose, fold properly, 
indorse, and present them to the Committee on Accounts. 

Sect. 2. He shall, whenever requested by the Committee on 
Finance, examine and audit the accounts of the City Treasurer 
and Collector of Taxes, and for that purpose shall have access to 
all books and papers in his possession, or in the possession of any 
other officer of the city, or of any committee of the Cit}^ Council, 
or either branch thereof. 

Sect. 3. Section third of the City Ordinance No. 4, entitled 
*' An ordinance relating to the finances of the city," is hereby 
repealed. 

In Common Council, April 12, 1876. 

Passed to be ordained. 

STILLMAN H. LIBBY, President. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermex, April 17, 1876. 

Passed to be ordamed. 

AUSTIN BELKNAP, Mayor. 



CUT GOVERNMENT FOR 1876. 



MAYOR, 

AUSTIN BELKNAP. 
House, Central Street; Office, City Hall. 



ALDERMEN. 
WARD ONE. 



Richard E. Kickerson 
John F. Cole 



WARD TWO. 



* • 



George A. Brtice 
Patrick Kafferty 

ward three. 
Jacob T. Glines .... 
Charles W. Sawyer . 



WARD FOUR. 



James B. David . 
John Harrington 



Pearl Street. 
Perkins Street. 

Highland Avenue. 
Somerville Avenue. 

Broadway. 
Sycamore Street. 

Belmont Street. 
Chesnut Court. 



COMMON COUNCIL, 

Stillman H. Libby, President, . 

WARD ONE. 

Oliver J. Davis 

George H. Crosby .... 
J. Preston Lovering .... 
Alonzo Bowers 



WARD TWO. 



QUINCY A. ViNAL 

James Long . 
George W. Trefren . 
Rudolph Kramer 



Elm Street. 

Pearl Street. 
Perkins Street. 
Benedict Avenue. 
Franklin Street. 

Aldersey Street. 
School Street. 
Laurel Street. 
Prescott Street. 



202 



WARD THREE. 

George C. Skilton .... Mills Street. 

John K. Conant Marshall Street. 

Amos M. Angier Marshall Street. 

Walter S. Barnes .... Yernon Street. 

WARD FOUR, 

Stillman H. Libby .... Elm Street. 

William A. Muzzey .... Newbury Street. 

John C. Nichols Central Street. 

Charles A. Mongan .... Belmont Street. 



CITY CLERK. 

Charles E. Gilman, Office, City Hall. 



CITY TREASURER. 

Aaron Sargent, Office, City Hall. 



CITY MESSENGER. 

Jairus Mann, Office, City Hall. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

George A. Kimball, Office, City Hall. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

Samuel C. Darling. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

A H. Carvill, Office, Bow Street. 



CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

Solomon Davis, W^ebster Street. 



CHIEF OF POLICE. 

Melvill C. Parkhurst, Office, Police Station. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

Eranklin Henderson, Central Street. 



203 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



James K. Hopkins 



"Wigglesworth Street. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SEWERS. 

David A. Sanborn", Prospect Street. 



WATER BOARD. 

Christopher E. Rymes, Chairman, 
Robert A. Yinal, Clerh 
Cutler Downer .... 
Thomas Cunningham . 
Horace Haskins .... 



Summer Street. 
"Walnut Street. 
Central Street. 
Oak Street. 
Franklin Street. 



OVERSEERS OF POOR. 

Austin Belknap, Mayor, Chairman, ex officio. 
Central Street, Office, City Hall. 

Horace CiiAPiN, Secreiar^/ . . . Office, Union Square. 
Thomas Cunningham .... Oak Street. 
Ansel Lewis Webster Street. 



ASSESSORS. 






Thomas Cunningham, Chairman 


Oak Street, 


Office 


John C. Tenney 

Frank G. Williams . . . . 


Mystic Av. 
Albion St. 


[ City 
Hall. 


George I. Yincent, Clerk . 


Cherry Street 





SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1876. 

Hon. Austin Belknap, Mayor, ex officio. 

Stillman H. liiBBY, President of Common Council, ex officio. 

WAR ONE. 

Henry M. Moore .... Myrtle Street. 
Sanford Hanscom, M. D. . . . Perkins Street. 
John H. Butler Benedict Street. 



WARD TWO. 



Daniel E. Chase 
Charles S. Lincoln 
Michael F. Farrell 



Park Street. 
Laurel Street. 
Grand View Avenue. 



§GS ^"^^Co 



30 2.CJ m^, 

8TACK